AMBULANCES part XII Ambulances on Alphabet beginning with MB till N

AMBULANCES part XII Ambulances on Alphabet beginning with MB till N

23.5.1957
Operationswagen der Chirurg. Klinik Heidelberg
(1. Fahrbarer Operationssaal der Bundesrepublik)

Mercedes-Benz Typ 200 / 200 D Krankenwagen, Aufbau Binz auf Fahrgestell mit langem Radstand, ca. 1967 (Werkfoto Fa. Binz, Lorch)

1994

Lots off different Mercedes-Benz Ambulances and Hearses from 1924

Lots off Mercury Ambulances and hearses

767 best Last ride images on Pinterest

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Miller – Miller Meteor Ambulances and Hearses

MINERVA Ambulances and Hearses between 1914 and 1952

Mini Ambulance

Mitsubishi Ambulances and hearses

tpt transport truck lorry wagon hampshire ambulance service bedford austin 3 three way morris commercial

Morris & Morris Commercial Ambulances & Hearses

1974 Mowag W 200

MOWAG – MOWAG Dodge – MOWAG Eagle Ambulances

For as far as I know there are no more Ambulances and Hearses beginning with an M

MERCURY automobiles Dearborn Michigan USA 1938-2011 founded by Edsel Ford

1939 Mercury Eight

1939 Mercury Eight

Mercury (automobile)

Mercury
Division
Industry Automotive
Fate Dissolved
Founded 1938, by Edsel Ford
Defunct January 4, 2011
Headquarters Dearborn, Michigan, U.S.
Key people
Edsel Ford, founder
Products Automobiles
Parent Ford Motor Company
Website www.MercuryVehicles.com

Mercury was a car brand of the Ford Motor Company launched in 1938 by Edsel Ford, son of Henry Ford, to market entry-level luxury cars slotted between Ford-branded regular models and Lincoln-branded luxury vehicles, similar to General MotorsBuick (and former Oldsmobile) brand, and Chrysler’s DeSoto division.

From 1945 to 2011, Mercury was half of the Lincoln-Mercury division of Ford; however, for the 1958-1960 model years, the Lincoln-Mercury division was known as Lincoln-Edsel-Mercury with the inclusion of the Edsel brand. Through rebadging, the majority of Mercury models were based on Ford platforms.

1939 Mercury Sedan Coupé

1939 Mercury Sedan Coupé

The name “Mercury” is derived from the messenger of the gods of Roman mythology, and during its early years, the Mercury brand was known for performance, which was briefly revived in 2003 with the Mercury Marauder. The brand was sold in the United States, Mexico, Puerto Rico, U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Middle East. In 1999, the Mercury brand was dropped in Canada, although the Grand Marquis was still marketed there wearing a Mercury badge through 2007.

The Mercury brand was phased out in 2011 as Ford Motor Company refocused its marketing and engineering efforts on the Ford and Lincoln brands. Production of Mercury vehicles ceased in the fourth quarter of 2010. The final Mercury automobile, a Grand Marquis, rolled off the assembly line on January 4, 2011.

History

1940 Mercury

1940 Mercury

During the mid-1930s, despite the continuing success of its new V8-powered models, Ford Motor Company was in danger of being left at a competitive disadvantage to both of its largest competitors. While General Motors and upstart Chrysler Corporation both had a comprehensive line of brands (in terms of price), by 1935, Ford sold only its namesake brand and the cars of Lincoln Motor Company. Aside from the Cadillac V-16, the Lincoln Model K was one of the most expensive vehicles in the United States.

1940 Mercury Coupe 03

1940 Mercury Coupe 03

In 1933, Chevrolet had used the Mercury name on a passenger car called the Chevrolet Mercury as a lower-priced alternative to the 1933 Chevrolet Confederate. The name was used only for 1933, after which it was renamed the Chevrolet Standard for 1934.

From 1936 to 1939, Ford would introduce several different models; all were intended to bridge the massive price gap between the highest-trim V8 Ford and the base model of the V12 Lincoln. In 1936, Lincoln introduced the Lincoln-Zephyr. A standardized and far more modern body than the Model K allowed for a much lower price, opening Lincoln to compete directly with the Cadillac LaSalle brand. Inside Ford, there was debate whether a medium-priced car should be a Ford model or a new marque entirely. Eventually, the company took both approaches. For 1938, Ford introduced the De Luxe Ford model line; it was largely differentiated from the standard V8 Ford by upscale trim and a distinct hood and grille. For 1939, the Mercury was introduced. Started as a distinct company in 1937 by Edsel Ford, Mercury was chosen from over 100 potential model and marque names. The designs of the new car (referred to as the “Mercury Eight”) were done by E.T. ‘Bob’ Gregorie.

Early years

1947 Mercury Town Sedan

 Mercury Town Sedan 1947

The 1939 Mercury Eight began production in 1938, with a 239 cu. in. 95 horsepower (71 kW; 96 PS) flathead V8 engine. Over 65,800 were sold the first year, at a price of $916 (approximately $14,000 in 2010 dollars). It was an all new car, sharing no body panels with either Ford or Lincoln. Its body was six inches wider than Ford and rode on a 116.0 inches (2,950 mm) wheelbase, four inches longer than Ford.

Mercury logo

1938-1951 Mercury Eight

For the space mission, see Mercury 8.
Not to be confused with Chevrolet Mercury.
Mercury Eight
1939 Ford Mercury Green
Overview
Manufacturer Mercury
Production 1938–1951
Assembly Long Beach, California, USA
Maywood, California (starting 1948)
Dearborn, Michigan USA
Wayne, Michigan USA
St. Louis Missouri USA
Edison, New Jersey USA
Body and chassis
Class Full-size
Layout FR layout
Chronology
Successor Mercury Monterey

The Mercury Eight was the first model of the Ford Motor Company‘s Mercury marque and was produced from the 1939 through the 1951 model years. It was the only model offered by Mercury until the marque starting producing multiple series in the 1952 model year, at which point it was dropped as a model designation.

1939 Mercury Eight billboard Phoenix Cardealer

 1939 Mercury Eight billboard

1939–1940

1939 Mercury Sedan Coupé

 1939 Mercury 8 Sedan Coupe
1939 Mercury and a B-17
1939 Mercury and a B-17
First generation
1939 Mercury Series 99A Convertible Coupé

1939 Mercury 8 Sport Convertible
Overview
Model years 1939–1940
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door coupe
2-door convertible
2-door sedan
4-door sedan
4-door convertible
Powertrain
Engine 239 cu in (3.9 L) Flathead V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 116.0 in (2,946 mm)
Length 196.0 in (4,978 mm)
1939 Mercury 8 Town-Sedan

 1939 Mercury 8 Town-Sedan

The advertisements for this car declared it to be “The car that truly dares to ask ‘Why?'”, referring to the idea that a big car couldn’t also be economical. The Mercury was priced in the thousand dollar range, several hundred dollars more than the Ford V-8, several hundred less than the Lincoln-Zephyr and about the same as the upper range Oldsmobile and Dodges and the lower-range Buicks and Chryslers, sales from all of which, it was hoped, the new Mercury would usurp. Its engine was a 95 hp version of the Ford flathead V8 engine, its styling was inspired by the Zephyr, and it had hydraulic brakes from the beginning. With a wheelbase of 116.0 in (2,946 mm) and an overall length of 196.0 in (4,978 mm), it was a good sized car, which the Ford company advertised extensively, together with its up-to-20 mpg performance-“few cars of any size can equal such economy.” Double sun visors became standard in 1940. Braking was via 12 inch drums.

Although “Eight” script would not appear on the front of the hood until the 1941 model year, sales literature prominently referred to the car as the “Mercury Eight” from the very beginning. This is no doubt because the actual series names, 99A in 1939 and 09A in 1940, were somewhat less enticing. A 1940 09A model has the words “Mercury Eight” in an emblem that runs from front to rear alongside the top hood lines on both sides. It appears as chrome wording on top of a double red bar.

By the end of 1940 Mercury could run with the headline “It’s made 150,000 owners change cars!”

1941–1948

1941 Mercury Eight station wagon - stuck in the mud with race car designer John Crosthwaite (standing)

 1941 Mercury Eight station wagon – stuck in the mud with race car designer John Crosthwaite (standing)
Second generation
1941 Mercury Series 19A Club Convertible Coupé
Overview
Model years 1941–1948
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door coupe
2-door convertible
4-door sedan
4-door station wagon
2-door Sportsman convertible
Powertrain
Engine 239 cu in (3.9 L) Flathead V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 118.0 in (2,997 mm)
Length 1941-46: 201.6 in (5,121 mm)
1947-48: 201.8 in (5,126 mm)
Curb weight 3,400–3,800 lb (1,500–1,700 kg)
1946 Mercury Eight sedan

 1946 Mercury Eight sedan
1947 Mercury Eight

 1947 Mercury Eight
1948 Mercury Eight convertible rear

 1948 Mercury Eight convertible rear

The 1941 Mercury Eight got all-new styling and some engineering improvements. The Mercury now shared its bodyshell with Ford, probably to lower Mercury production costs. Mercury’s wheelbase was expanded by 2.0 in (51 mm) to 118.0 in (2,997 mm). There were many chassis refinements, including improved spring lengths, rates, and deflections, plus changes in shackling, shocks, and an improved stabilizer bar, but the old fashioned transverse springs were still used. The new body featured door bottoms that flared out over the running boards, allowing for wider seats and interiors. The car had 2.0 in (51 mm) more headroom, two-piece front fenders (three-piece at first), and more glass area. The front pillars were made slimmer and the windshield was widened, deepened, and angled more steeply. Parking lights were separate and set atop the fenders for greater visibility. Headlight bezels were redesigned. In all closed Mercurys the rear-quarter windows opened out. Front vent wings were now crank-operated, and in closed cars the ventilation wing support bars rolled down with the windows. The 4-door convertible, offered in 1940, was gone, but a station wagon was added. The woodie wagon’s body behind the engine cowl was identical to Ford’s, and produced at the company’s Iron Mountain plant in Michigan‘s Upper Peninsula. The “Eight” script was moved to the rear of the hood. 90,556 Mercury Eights were sold in the 1941 model year.

In 1942 the Mercury Eight’s slender bullet parking lights were replaced with rectangular units placed high on the fenders inboard of the headlights. Running boards were now completely concealed under flared door bottoms. The instrument panel now features two identical circles for speedometer and clock with gauges to the left of the speedometer, a glove compartment to the right of the clock, and a large radio speaker cover in the center. The grille looked more like that of the Lincoln-Zephyr and Continental. The “Eight” script was gone but an “8” appeared at the top of the grille center. Horsepower was increased to 100. Mercury’s biggest engineering news for 1942 was “Liquamatic,” Ford’s first semiautomatic transmission. It wasn’t much of a success and Mercury wouldn’t have another automatic transmission until Merc-O-Matic appeared in 1951, which was of course a true automatic. Mercury production for the short 1942 model year totaled only 1,902. Output was halted in February 1942 as American auto plants were converted to the exclusive production of war material.

Although Mercury’s prewar history was short, the Mercury Eight had already earned for itself the image of being a fine performer in mph as well as mpg, this “hot car” image quite in keeping with its name, chosen by Edsel Ford, that of the fleet-footed messenger of the gods of Roman mythology. The Mercury Eight was strongly identified as an upmarket Ford during this period. In 1945 the Lincoln-Mercury division would be established to change that.

A new grille was the most noticeable difference between the 1942 and 1946 Mercurys. It had thin vertical bars surrounded by a trim piece painted the same color as the car. An “Eight” script now appeared down its center. The Liquimatic automatic transmission option was eliminated. The most distinctive new Mercury was the Sportsman convertible. It featured wood body panels. Only 205 examples of it were produced and it was discontinued the following model year. Mercury Eight sales totaled 86,603.

Styling changes were slight in 1947. The Mercury name was placed on the side of the hood. Different hubcaps were used. The border around the grille was chrome plated. The “Eight” script still ran down its center. There was also new trunk trim. More chrome was used on the interior and the dash dial faces were redesigned. The convertible and station wagon came with leather upholstery. The other body styles used fabric. The wood paneled Sportsman convertible was gone. 86,363 Mercury Eights were sold.

For all practical purposes the 1948 Mercury Eights were identical to the 1947s. The major changes consisted of different dial faces and no steering column lock. 50,268 Mercury Eights were sold.

1949–1951

1950 Mercury Eight station wagon

 1950 Mercury Eight station wagon
Third generation
1950 Mercury 8 Convertible 130PS
Overview
Model years 1949–1951
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door coupe
2-door Monterey coupe
2-door convertible
4-door sedan
2-door station wagon
Related Lincoln EL-series
Powertrain
Engine 255 cu in (4.2 L) Flathead V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 118.0 in (2,997 mm)
Length 206.8 in (5,253 mm)
Curb weight 3,500–4,000 lb (1,600–1,800 kg)
1951 Mercury Eight coupe

 1951 Mercury Eight coupe
1951 Mercury Eight with suicide doors

 1951 Mercury Eight with suicide doors

The first postwar Mercury was introduced in the 1949 model year. The engine was a flathead V8 that produced slightly more power than the then also newly designed 1949 Ford. A new overdrive system was optional, activated by a handle under the dash. The styling of the Mercury Eight, when it was released in 1949, adopted the “ponton” appearance, and was successful in both ending the monotony of warmed-over pre-war style, and differentiating Mercury from its comparable Ford cousin, a trick that spelled sales success. Sales figures for both Ford and Mercury broke records in 1949. The new approach to styling was also evident on the completely redesigned Lincoln and the all new Lincoln Cosmopolitan. The Mercury Eight used full instrumentation. An 8 tube radio as an option. The 4-door station wagon was replaced with a 2-door model. Although the wagon now featured an all-metal roof, its sides still consisted of wood panels.

Within its era and beyond, the Mercury Eight was popular with customizers. In 1949, Sam Barris built the first lead sled from a 1949 Mercury Eight; the Eight became the definitive lead sled, much as the Ford V-8 (as the “deuce”) was becoming the definitive hot rod. The Eights were among the first models to receive an aftermarket OHV engine swap, since Oldsmobile and Cadillac developed the first high-compression OHV V8 engines in 1949, whereas Ford was still using a sidevalve engine. Sam and George Barris also used the 1949 body style to build “the most famous custom car ever”, the Hirohata Merc

1951 Bob Hirohata's '51 Merc on display at the NHRA Museum in 2007

1951 Bob Hirohata’s ’51 Merc on display at the NHRA Museum in 2007

 for customer Bob Hirohata in 1953. Setting a style and an attitude, it had a “momentous effect” on custom car builders, appeared in several magazines at the time, and reappeared numerous times since, earning an honorable mention on Rod & Custom ’​s “Twenty Best of All Time” list in 1991. The Eight remains a very popular subject for car modellers.

Fiberglass replicas of the Eight, inspired by Sam Barris’s car, are still in production and are popular with custom and rod enthusiasts.

In 1950, a high-end two-door Monterey coupe was introduced in the same vein as the Ford Crestliner, the Lincoln Lido coupe and the Lincoln Cosmopolitan Capri coupe in order to compete with the hardtop coupes General Motors had introduced the previous model year. The front suspension was independent with stabilizer bars. In 1952 the Monterey would become its own series.

In 1990, Mattel Hot Wheels created a model of 1949 Mercury with a chopped top. It is called Purple Passion. Purple Passion is one of most desirable and priciest Hot Wheels to ever be cast.

Appearances in popular culture

The car makes notable appearances in a number of films: Rebel Without a Cause (1955), American Graffiti (1973), Badlands (1973), Grease (1978) and Cobra (1986). Cobrawould use one of the first all-fiberglass copies.

A customized 1949 Mercury was also used to play the Batmobile in the Batman and Robin serial.

The character Sheriff from Cars was a 1949 Mercury Police Cruiser.

The car also appears in the video game Hitman: Absolution as the main character’s, Agent 47, vehicle.

See also

Owner: James Whitesal, Oxford, PA
 The 1949 Merc has been rodded since the 1950s

For 1941, the Mercury would share its bodyshell with the 1941 Ford. Prior to World War II, Mercury Eights had a Lincoln-style split grille, while postwar models received a single opening grille.

Prior to 1945, Mercury operated as a division within Ford. After World War II, Ford combined Mercury and Lincoln into the Lincoln-Mercury division. Although maintaining the same position in the brand hierarchy, Mercury was positioned closer to Lincoln in order to gain exposure for the brand. As Ford introduced its first “integrated” post-war designs for 1949, the Mercury Eight and the Lincoln shared much of their body (aside from headlights and the grille); however, the Mercury and the Lincoln wore different levels of interior trim. The postwar Mercury Eight would develop a following as a street rod, making an appearance in several films.

1950s

1954 Mercury Monterey Sun Valley Hardtop Coupe

 1954 Mercury Monterey Sun Valley Hardtop Coupe
1956 Mercury Montclair 4-door Hardtop

 1956 Mercury Montclair 4-door Hardtop

Since its 1939 introduction, Mercury had consisted of a single-vehicle model line; many of its medium-price competitors had begun to expand their model ranges. As a response, for 1952, the Mercury lineup would double in size. Borrowing a name introduced on a sub-model of a Mercury Eight coupe in 1950, the Monterey

Mercury logo (1)

1952-1974 Mercury Monterey

For the Monterey minivan produced from 2004 to 2007, see Ford Freestar#Mercury Monterey.
Mercury Monterey
1971 Mercury MONTEREYFRONT
Overview
Manufacturer Ford Motor Company
Production 1952–1974
Assembly St. Louis, Missouri
Maywood, California
Pico Rivera, California
Atlanta, Georgia
Mahwah, New Jersey
Body and chassis
Class Full-size
Body style 4-door sedan
2-door coupe
Layout FR layout
Chronology
Predecessor Mercury Eight
Successor Mercury Marquis

The Mercury Monterey is a full-size car model introduced by the Mercury division of the Ford Motor Company in 1952. It would later share the same body style with the slightly more upscale Marquis,

Mercury logo

1967-1986 Mercury Marquis

Mercury Marquis
1969 mercury marquis in australia

Overview
Manufacturer Ford Motor Company
Production 1967–1986
Body and chassis
Class Full-size (1967-1982)
Mid-size (1983-1986)
Chronology
Predecessor Mercury Montclair
Mercury Park Lane

Successor Full-size: Mercury Grand Marquis
Mid-size: Mercury Sable

The Mercury Marquis is a vehicle sold that was by the Mercury brand of Ford Motor Company from 1967 to 1986. It was produced for several generations as the Mercury counterpart of the full-size Ford (its direct equivalent was the Ford LTD); in 1983, the Marquis became Mercury’s mid-size car. The highest trim level of the Marquis, the Grand Marquis, continued in production as the full-size Mercury product line.

As Ford Motor Company adopted front-wheel drive cars during the 1980s, the Marquis was phased out after the 1986 model year; it was replaced by the Mercury Sable, the twin of the Ford Taurus.

The word “Marquis” is a French spelling of the English word marquess, which was a nobility title prior to the Middle Ages.

1967–1968

1967-1968
1968 Mercury Marquis.jpg.
Overview
Production 1967–1968
Assembly Hazelwood, Missouri (St. Louis Assembly Plant)
Pico Rivera, California (Los Angeles Assembly)
Hapeville, Georgia (Atlanta Assembly)
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door hardtop
Related
Powertrain
Engine 410 cu in (6.7 L) FE V8
390 cu in (6.4 L) 330 hp (246 kW)FE V8
428 cu in (7.0 L) Super MarauderV8
Transmission 3-speed C6 automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase 123 in (3,124 mm) (1967)
Length 218.5 in (5,550 mm)
1967 Mercury Marquis front

 1967 Mercury Marquis

The Mercury Marquis was introduced for the 1967 model year as part of the full-size Mercury lineup. Slotted above the Mercury Monterey and filling in for the discontinued Montclair, the Marquis was positioned alongside the Park Lane in the lineup. Roughly the division’s counterpart to the Ford LTD introduced in 1965, the Marquis differed from the LTD with plusher interior trim and a higher level of standard equipment. Unlike the Ford, the Marquis was produced in a single two-door hardtop body style; convertibles and Marauder fastbacks remained part of the Park Lane lineup. All four-door hardtop models were Park Lane Broughams .

1958-1968 Mercury Park Lane

Mercury Park Lane
1964 Mercury Park Lane 02
Overview
Manufacturer Ford Motor Company
Production 1958–1960
1964–1968
Body and chassis
Class Full-size
Layout FR layout

The Mercury Park Lane was a fullsize automobile produced by the Mercury division of the Ford Motor Company from 1958 to 1960 and by the Lincoln-Mercury Division from 1964 to 1968. During this time, the Park Lane resembled the Monterey, but with a higher trim level.

First generation

First generation
1959 Mercury Park Lane 2
Overview
Model years 1958–1960
Assembly Metuchen, New Jersey
Pico Rivera, California
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door coupe
2-door convertible
4-door hardtop
Powertrain
Engine 430 cu in (7.0 l) V8

The Park Lane was introduced in 1958 and was applied to Mercury’s premium automobile line. The Park Lane name had first been used for a 1956 Ford two door station wagon model that was supposed to compete with the Chevrolet Nomad. 1958 Park Lane’s wheelbase was 125 inches, 3 inches longer than other Mercury models, length was 220.2 inches and other models 213.2 inches. For the 1959 model year the Park Lane’s wheelbase was increased to 128 inches (3,300 mm), two inches longer than the rest of the Mercury line. In 1960, its wheelbase was reduced to 126 inches (3,200 mm), matching the rest of the Mercury line, overall length was 219.2 inches for all full size Mercurys. 1960 Park Lanes were available as a two door hardtop, four door hardtop or convertible. 1960 Park Lane standard features were a 430 cubic inch 310 horsepower V8 with 460 foot pounds of torque, Multi-Drive Merc-O-Matic automatic transmission, power steering and brakes, fender skirts, wide rocker panel moldings, 5 chrome accent bars ahead of the rear wheel openings, rear backup lights, padded dash and windshield washers. The Park Lane name was dropped in the 1961 model year as Mercury focused its production efforts on the lower-end Monterey and Meteor 800 models.

1959 Mercury Park Lane Convertible Coupe

 1959 Mercury Park Lane convertible
1959 Mercury Park Lane coupe
1959 Mercury Park Lane coupe

Second generation

Second generation
Mercury Park Lane photographed in Montreal
Overview
Model years 1964–1968
Assembly Hazelwood, Missouri (St. Louis Assembly Plant)
Pico Rivera, California (Los Angeles Assembly)
Hapeville, Georgia (Atlanta Assembly)
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door Hardtop
4-door Hardtop
4-door station wagon
Powertrain
Engine 410 cu in (6.7 l) V8
428 cu in (7.0 l) V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 123 in (3,124 mm)

The name was reinstated in 1964 as Mercury again attempted to retrench its models in the price gap between Ford and Lincoln. Most Park Lanes had a “Breezeway” window, a powered reverse slanted rear window that could be lowered into the body, first used on the Mercury Turnpike Cruiser and the 1958-60 Lincoln Continental. Park Lanes were available with the Marauder package (as were all full-size ’64 Mercurys) which featured the “fastback” roof design in place of the Breezeway, and which were also used on the popular full-size Ford line.

For 1967 and 1968, the Park Lane was offered with an even more luxurious trim level called the Brougham, a.k.a. the Park Lane Brougham. These were Mercury’s flagship products during these years.

1958 Mercury Park Lane Phaeton Sedan 4-Door Hardtop

Mercury completely redesigned its full-size offerings for 1969, and the Park Lane name was retired at the end of the 1968 model year, to be replaced by the Marquis. However, the Park Lane name was brought back in the 1990s as a trim package on the Grand Marquis offered by Lincoln-Mercury dealerships in select markets. The package typically included a carriage, landau, or vinyl roof, chrome wheels, and “Park Lane” badging.

1964 Mercury Park Lane 4-door Hardtop with Maurader package

 1964 Mercury Park Lane 4-door Hardtop with “Maurader” package

1966 Mercury Park Lane 2-Door Hardtop1966 Mercury Park Lane 2-Door Hardtop

1990's Mercury Grand Marquis-Park Lane

Mercury Park Lane revived as a Grand Marquis package in the 1990s

.

Mercury Park Lane Brougham


1968 Mercury Park Lane Brougham 4-door hardtop

Mercury Park Lane Brougham
1968 Mercury Park Lane Brougham
Overview
Manufacturer Ford Motor Company
Production 1967–1968
Body and chassis
Body style 4-door sedan
4-door hardtop
2-door fastback (1968 only)

Triple-black 1968 Mercury Park Lane Brougham 4-door hardtop

1968 Mercury Park Lane Brougham 4-door hardtop 3

The Park Lane Brougham was the Ford Motor Company’s flagship Mercury model during its two year run from 1967-1968. Powerful and luxurious, it was offered as a four-door sedan, a four-door hardtop and, quite rarely, as a two-door hardtop (1968 only). The Brougham differentiated itself from the standard Park Lane by featuring 50-50 split bench seats with deep foam and thick box pleating, upscale door panels with higher trim levels and pull straps, and unique ornamentation. Viewers of the 1968-1980 CBS crime drama Hawaii Five-O may recall Jack Lord‘s character frequently squealing tires throughout Honolulu in a triple-black 1968 Mercury Park Lane Brougham 4-door hardtop.

Mechanical Details

The 1967 Marquis came with the Mercury-exclusive 330 hp (246 kW) 410 cubic-inch big-block V8 as standard equipment, which was actually an FE 390 block with 390 pistons and a 428 crankshaft changing the cubic inch displacement of the 390 to 410. Ford did this to save money and still offer a different engine displacement on the Mercury. For 1968, the 410 was replaced by the 315 hp (235 kW) 390 big-block with a two-barrel carburetor. For both years, an optional 345 hp (257 kW) 428 cubic-inch “Super Marauder”engine with a four-barrel carburetor was also available.

Mercury logo

Mercury Meteor

For the model by the same name offered in Canada from 1949 to 1976, see Meteor (automobile).
Mercury Meteor
1961 Mercury Meteor 800 four-door hardtop in Tawny Beige.
Overview
Manufacturer Ford Motor Company
Production 1961–1963
Body and chassis
Class Full-Size (1961)
Mid-size (1962–1963)
Body style 2-door hardtop
2-door sedan
4-door sedan
4-door hardtop
4-door station wagon
Layout FR layout

The Mercury Meteor was an automobile model produced by the Lincoln Mercury division of the Ford Motor Company from 1961 to 1963. For 1961, the name was applied to low-end full-sized vehicles; for 1962 and 1963, the name was applied to Mercury’s mid-sized sedans, in a marketing attempt to appeal to the excitement surrounding the Space Race, before being discontinued. Introduced while Mercury as a marque was in flux, and never a solid marketplace performer in consumer sales, the Meteor remains more an “asterisk” than as a well known Mercury product.

Canadian Meteor

Initially, Ford used the Meteor nameplate in 1949 when it created a stand alone brand of vehicles that used Ford bodies trimmed using Mercury parts for sale specifically in the Canadian marketplace. Meteors were produced and sold in Canada until 1961, and then reintroduced again from 1964 to 1976, after the US model using the name was discontinued.

Factors affecting the creation of the Mercury Meteor

In the mid 1950s, Ford Executives were convinced by Ernest Breech that in order to compete with General Motors, the automaker had to meet each sales segment with unique product. The plan impacted Mercury by calling for the marques completely new platform and body design since World War II in order to differentiate it from the Ford beginning with the 1957 model year.

Historically, Mercury was usually considered a “lower-medium-priced” car, most often compared to Pontiac and Dodge. Under Breech’s plan Mercury would move upmarket and compete more directly with Buick, Oldsmobile, Chrysler and DeSoto and the Edselwould take over Mercury’s previous role as the “lower-medium-priced” car and compete more directly with Pontiac and Dodge.

While Breech’s plan could have succeeded in the early 1950s, by the late 1950s the bottom was beginning to drop out of the middle price car market; the 1958 recession effectively rendered Breech’s plan obsolete. Sales of Ford’s Edsel marque were a complete disaster.

Sales of Mercury products failed to reach expected sale levels, leading to cost cutting decisions beginning in the 1961 model year. Had Robert S. McNamara, then head of the Ford division, had his way, Lincoln, Edsel and Mercury would have been relegated to the dustbin of history. Instead, a compromise decision was made, and beginning in 1961 Ford and Mercury would use the basic Ford body shells, and rely upon unique trim elements to differentiate the marques one from another. Edsel, meanwhile, was discontinued after a short run of 1960 models; what emerged as the 1961 Mercury Meteor was really initially intended as the 1961 Edsel.

1961 Mercury Meteor

First Generation
1961 Meteor open
Overview
Production 1960–1961
Assembly Pico Rivera, California
Mahwah, New Jersey
St. Louis, Missouri
Wayne, Michigan
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door sedan
2-door hardtop
4-door hardtop
4-door sedan
Related Ford Fairlane
Ford Galaxie
Mercury Monterey
Powertrain
Engine 223 in3 OHV Straight-6
292 in3 Y-block V8
352 in3 FE V8
390 in3 FE V8
Transmission 2-speed automatic
3-speed automatic
2-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase 3,047 mm (120.0 in)

The first step taken to make Mercury cost effective within Ford, Mercury shed its higher priced Montclair and Park Lane models. The Monterey, previously the entry-level full-sized Mercury offering and priced slightly higher for the 1961 model year than comparable 1960 models, would become the new top-of-the-line model. It was joined by the new, lower-priced Meteor 600 and Meteor 800. The Meteor 600 and Meteor 800 were, respectively, the spiritual descendants of the Medalist and Custom models last offered in 1956, as well as replacements for the discontinued Edsel. All full-sized 1961 Mercurys rode on a 120” wheelbase.

For 1961 the Meteor was a full-sized model, differentiated from the Monterey through its trim and taillights. Meteor 600 taillights were oblong while the Meteor 800 and upmarket Monterey used six circular tail lights, three on each side. Meteor 600s, available only as two- and four-door sedans featured chrome spears from the taillights to the front wheels. Meteor 800s, available in two- and four-door sedan and hardtop body styles, featured the spear and three chrome bars on the front fenders, chrome fender fin trim, rocker panel trim and back-up lights.

The Commuter 4-door station wagon was trimmed comparably to the Meteors, while the Colony Park with simulated woodgrain trim on the side-panels was trimmed comparably to the Monterey.

350px-Logo_della_Mercury_(auto).svg

Mercury Colony Park

Mercury Colony Park
1984 Mercury Grand Marquis Colony Park

1984 Mercury Grand Marquis Colony Park
Overview
Manufacturer Ford Motor Company
Production 1957–1991
Body and chassis
Class Full-size
Body style 4-door station wagon
Layout FR layout
Chronology
Predecessor Mercury Monterey station wagon (1952-1956)

The Mercury Colony Park was the top-of-the-line full-size station wagon offered by the Mercury division of Ford Motor Company between 1957 and 1991. Following the demise of Edsel, the Colony Park became the Mercury equivalent of the Ford Country Squire and the station wagon version of the Marquis in 1969.

It was distinguished by woodgrain paneling on the body sides and tailgate, a feature also associated with competitive station wagons such as the Chrysler Town & Country and the Oldsmobile Custom Cruiser.

1957–1958

First generation
1957 Mercury Colony Park
Overview
Model years 1957–1958
Body and chassis
Related Mercury Turnpike Cruiser
Mercury Park Lane
Mercury Montclair
Mercury Monterey
Mercury Voyager
Mercury Commuter
Edsel Citation
Edsel Corsair
Powertrain
Engine 368 cu in (6.0 L) Lincoln Y-BlockV8
383 cu in (6.3 L) Marauder V8
430 cu in (7.0 L) Super MarauderV8
Transmission 3-speed manual
3-speed Merc-O-Matic automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase 122.0 in (3,099 mm)
Length 1957: 211.1 in (5,362 mm)
1958: 214.2 in (5,441 mm)
Width 79.1 in (2,009 mm)
Height 58.3 in (1,481 mm)
Curb weight 4,400–4,800 lb (2,000–2,200 kg)

For 1957, Mercury followed Ford in creating a separate model series for its station wagons; the Colony Park served as the top model above the Voyager

Mercury logo

Mercury Voyager

Mercury Voyager
1957 Two Door Mercury Hardtop Station Wagon.
Overview
Manufacturer Mercury
Production 1957–1958
Body and chassis
Class Full-size
Layout FR layout
Powertrain
Engine 368 cu in (6.0 L) Lincoln Y-Block V8

The Mercury Voyager was Mercury’s mid-priced full-size station wagon from 1957 through 1958. When introduced for the 1957 model year it was priced between Mercury’s other two new full size wagons, the Mercury Commuter and the Colony Park. It was available as both a 2-door (of which 2283 units were produced in 1957) and a 4-door.

Examples in today’s market typically feature the combination of the optional 368 cu in (6.0 L) Lincoln Y-Block V8 with a push-button transmission and power steering.

and the Commuter. Rather than sharing a body and chassis with the 1957 Ford, the Mercury line, including the station wagons, shared their chassis and body with two models from the upcoming Edsel division.

To differentiate itself from lesser Mercury wagons, the Colony Park was fitted with simulated woodgrain siding as standard equipment. Unlike Ford or Edsel wagons, Mercury wagons were all configured in a hardtop (pillarless) bodystyle unique .

Just as on the Mercury Turnpike Cruiser, the 368 cu in (6.0 L) Lincoln Y-Block V8 was standard equipment in 1957. In 1958, Mercury introduced 383 and 430 cubic-inch Marauder and Super Marauder V8s as options. Inside, an electric clock was also standard. A padded dash was optional.

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further with the mercury colony park

1959–1960

Second generation
1960 Mercury Colony Park, one of 7411 built that year
Overview
Model years 1959–1960
Body and chassis
Related Mercury Park Lane
Mercury Montclair
Mercury Monterey
Mercury Commuter
Powertrain
Engine 383 cu in (6.3 L) Marauder V8
430 cu in (7.0 L) Super MarauderV8
Transmission 3-speed Merc-O-Matic automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase 126.0 in (3,200 mm)
Length 1959: 218.2 in (5,542 mm)
1960: 219.2 in (5,568 mm)
Width 1959: 80.7 in (2,050 mm)
1960: 81.5 in (2,070 mm)
Height 57.8 in (1,468 mm)
Curb weight 4,800–4,900 lb (2,200–2,200 kg)

Along with the rest of the Mercury product line, the station wagons were updated for the 1959 model year; the mid-price Voyager was discontinued, trimming the station wagon line down to the Colony Park and the base-model Commuter.

With the demise of the premium-model Edsels, the Mercury division now had a body and chassis to itself. The 1959 redesign gave the Colony Park a 4-inch wheelbase stretch, to 126 inches. With a curb weight of nearly 5000 pounds, Mercury specified the 315-hp 430 cubic-inch MEL engine shared with Lincoln and the Ford Thunderbird.

Mercury station wagons of this vintage had the longest wheelbase, the widest bodies and the most cargo space of any station wagon ever built by this make.

1960 to 1970 comparison 1960 Colony Park 1970 Colony Park
Wheelbase 126.0 in (3,200 mm) 121.0 in (3,073 mm)
Track Width (front/rear) 60.0 in (1,524 mm) 64.1 in (1,628 mm)/64.3 in (1,633 mm)
Overall Length 219.2 in (5,568 mm) 220.5 in (5,601 mm)
Width 81.5 in (2,070 mm) 79.8 in (2,027 mm)
Top Front Seat to Top Tailgate (closed) 83.4 in (2,118 mm) 84.0 in (2,134 mm)
Top Second Seat to Top Tailgate (closed) 49.5 in (1,257 mm) 51.0 in (1,295 mm)
Width at Second Seat 60.8 in (1,544 mm) 62.0 in (1,575 mm)
Floor to Roof (over rear axle) 34.4 in (874 mm) 32.0 in (813 mm)
Total Cargo Capacity (behind front seat) 101.7 cu ft (2,880 L) 96.2 cu ft (2,724 L)
Total Cargo Capacity (behind rear seat) 60.4 cu ft (1,710 L) 58.4 cu ft (1,654 L)

1959 Mercury Colony Park frame off restoration and info.

1961–1964

Third generation
1963 Mercury Colony Park station wagon
Overview
Also called Mercury Monterey Colony Park
Model years 1961–1964
Body and chassis
Related Mercury Park Lane
Mercury Montclair
Mercury Monterey
Mercury Meteor
Mercury Commuter
Ford Galaxie
Ford Fairlane
Ford 300
Ford Custom
Ford Country Squire
Dimensions
Wheelbase 120.0 in (3,048 mm)

The 1961-64 Mercury station wagons were the first since 1956 to share a body and chassis with Ford. This move was made because of declining Mercury sales from 1957 to 1960, and despite the obvious Ford origins of this generation of Mercurys, buyers began to return to the make. Indeed, the Mercury division’s best sales years came during the early years when the cars were seen as little more than “gussied-up Fords.”

Although Mercury station wagons remained a stand-alone series, the Colony Park was the wagon counterpart to the Monterey, which in 1962 and 1963 was the sole full-size sedan in the lineup (excluding the high-performance S-55).

1965–1968

Fourth generation
1965 Mercury Colony Park
Overview
Production 1965–1968
Body and chassis
Related Mercury Commuter
Ford LTD
Ford Country Squire
Ford Galaxie
Mercury Marquis
Mercury Monterey
Powertrain
Engine 390 cu in (6.4 L) FE V8
410 cu in (6.7 L) Marauder V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 119.0 in (3,023 mm)

In 1965, Colony Park was promoted to “the Lincoln Continental of station wagons”, when it was given the Lincoln Continental’s suspension package (along with its cushy, floaterboat ride). It continued to enjoy this distinction through its final year.

The 1966 Colony Park was fitted with Ford’s two-way “Magic Doorgate”, which was designed to fold down like a conventional tailgate and also swing sideways like a door. Ford’s dual-facing rear seats became available on the 1967 Colony Park. Mercury also introduced a feature where windflow was directed across the rear window through channels integrated and covered with the “D” pillar. This also allowed fresh air to enter into the rear of the vehicle if the rear window was retracted into the tailgate.

On third-generation Colony Parks, the standard engine was a 390 cu in (6.4 L) FE V8 with 270 horsepower (200 kW). From 1966 to 1967, the 410 cu in (6.7 L) FE “Marauder” V8 with 330 horsepower (250 kW) was an option.

1966 Colony Park

 1966 Colony Park
1966 Mercury Colony Park with 2-way tailgate with side-swing door handle
1966 2-way tailgate with side-swing door handle

1969–1978

Fifth generation
1974 Mercury Marquis Colony Park station wagon

1974 Mercury Marquis Colony Park
Overview
Also called Mercury Marquis Colony Park
Production 1969–1978
Assembly Hazelwood, Missouri (St. Louis Assembly Plant)
Pico Rivera, California (Los Angeles Assembly)
Hapeville, Georgia (Atlanta Assembly)
Body and chassis
Related Ford LTD
Ford Country Squire
Ford Galaxie
Mercury Grand Marquis
Mercury Marquis
Powertrain
Engine 351 cu in (5.8 L) Windsor V8
400 cu in (6.6 L) Cleveland V8
460 cu in (7.5 L) 385 V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 121.0 in (3,073 mm)

When the full-size Mercury wagons were restyled for 1969, they were no longer a separate series, and the Colony Park became a member of the Marquis series. In contrast to the Marquis sedan, the Colony Park was based on the same 121-inch wheelbase as the Ford LTD. Also in 1969, the Magic Doorgate was reworked to that it could swing sideways without having to roll the window down.

This generation introduced covered headlights, which were deployed using a vacuum canister system that kept the doors down when a vacuum condition existed in the lines, provided by the engine when it was running. If a loss of vacuum occurred, the doors would retract up so that the headlights were visible if the system should fail.

Although narrower than the 1959–1960 generation, this generation of the Colony Park was the longest and heaviest of any before or after. Because of the car’s sheer heft, Mercury equipped this generation with a 400-cubic-inch (6.6 liter) V-8 as standard, with the Lima series 429-cubic-inch and 460-cubic-inch (7.5 liter) optional. For the final model year of this generation, 1978, the 351-cubic-inch V-8 became standard except in California and ‘High Altitude’ areas where the 400 was required, although the 400-2V and 460 remained available as options (except that the 460 was not available in California after Model Year 1976 in any FoMoCo car line), although it was less than desirable. Most surviving examples carry either of the two larger engines, as they were far more popular—not to mention more capable of powering such a heavy vehicle.

Approximately 7,850,000 full-size Fords and Mercurys were sold over 1969-78. This makes it the second best selling Ford automobile platform after the Ford Model T.

1972 Mercury Marquis Colony Park wagon

 1972 Colony Park
1976 Mercury Colony Park
1976 Colony Park

1979–1991

Sixth generation
1979–1987 Mercury Colony Park front
Overview
Also called Mercury Grand Marquis Colony Park
Production 1979–1991
124,027 produced
Assembly Hazelwood, Missouri (St. Louis Assembly)
Talbotville, Ontario, (St. Thomas Assembly)
Body and chassis
Platform Ford Panther platform
Related Ford LTD
Ford Country Squire
Ford LTD Crown Victoria
Mercury Grand Marquis
Mercury Marquis
Powertrain
Engine 302 cu in (4.9 L) 5.0 Windsor V8
351 cu in (5.8 L) Windsor V8
Transmission 3-speed C4 automatic
3-speed FMX automatic
4-speed AOD automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase 114.3 in (2,903 mm)
Length 219 in (5,563 mm)
Width 79.3 in (2,014 mm)
Height 56.5 in (1,435 mm)
Curb weight 4,032 lb (1,829 kg)

As part of a redesign for the 1979 model year, the Colony Park was moved from the Marquis line into the Grand Marquis line. In an ironic move, the redesign was part of extensive physical downsizing to the Mercury full-size product line. Joining its rivals from GM and Chrysler, the Colony Park had lost over 11 inches in length, 6.6 inches in wheelbase, 0.4 inches in width, and had shed slightly over 1,000 lbs in weight (in comparison to its 1978 predecessor). As before, woodgrain siding remained standard equipment, along with 8-passenger seating.

The Colony Park was powered by two engines: a 4.9 L Windsor V8 (identified as a 5.0 L by Ford) with a carbureted 5.8 L Windsor V8. The former 400- and 460-cubic-inch engines were discontinued, and the 5.8L was dropped after 1982, as most customers deemed the 302 Windsor engine sufficiently powerful. To further enhance fuel economy, in 1981, both engines were paired with the 4-speed AOD overdrive transmission, and the 4.9L V8 was given fuel injection.

This generation of Colony Park would see few substantial changes during its thirteen-year lifespan. For 1983, it became the sole full-size Mercury wagon as the previous year’s ‘base’ Marquis wagon was no longer offered as a full-size model. In 1986, the 5.8L engine made its return as an (rarely specified) option. Starting in 1987, the Colony Park wagon was offered in GS and LS trim.

After nine years with only detail changes to the body and trim, the Colony Park received a major update alongside the Grand Marquis for 1988. From the windshield forward, a more aerodynamic front end better integrated the fenders, grille, headlights, and bumpers. Inside, the front seats were modernized. For 1990, as part of an addition of a drivers’ side airbag, the entire instrument panel and dashboard received a redesign; all outboard seats received 3-point seatbelts.

1988-1991 Mercury Grand Marquis Colony Park
1979–1987 Mercury Colony Park front
1984 Mercury Colony Park rear
1984 Mercury Colony Park rear

Discontinuation

When the Grand Marquis was redesigned with aero-styling for 1992, the Colony Park station wagon was dropped from Mercury’s lineup. By that time, full-size station wagons were no longer popular due to the increasing popularity of minivans and SUVs. The last full-size station wagons, the Chevrolet Caprice, the Oldsmobile Custom Cruiser and the Buick Roadmaster Estate ended production in 1996. In 2005, Daimler Chrysler briefly reintroduced the Dodge Magnum name on a full-size wagon, based on the LX platform Chrysler 300, but it was dropped in 2008.

The standard engine in the Meteor and Commuter was a 223 cubic inch displacement inline six-cylinder with a 1-barrel carburetor that generated 135 horsepower (101 kW) @ 4000 rpm. Optional engines included a 292 cubic inch displacement V-8 with 2-barrel carburetor generating 175 horsepower (130 kW) @ 4200 rpm (standard on the Monterey on Colony Park), as well as a 352 cubic inch Marauder V-8 with 2-barrel carburetor generating 220 horsepower (160 kW), a 390 cubic inch Marauder V-8 with 4-barrel carburetor generating 300 horsepower (220 kW), and a 390 cubic inch Marauder V-8 with 4-barrel carburetor generating 330 horsepower (250 kW).

The standard transmission was a 3-speed manual with overdrive available as an option. Merc-O-Matic and Multi-Drive automatic transmissions were available as options.

Mercury logo (1)

The Edsel Comet

1960 Edsel Comet Prototype

EdsellogoE.svg

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA 1960 edsel comet 1960 Edsel 1961 Comet Prototype from November 11th 1959

The plans for 1961 was starting with the new Edsel, the Comet, but Ford dicided to close Edsel and brought the new car as the:

Mercury Comet

Mercury Comet
1960 Comet 2-door sedan
Overview
Manufacturer Ford Motor Company
Production 1960–1977
Assembly Oakville, Ontario, Canada
Claycomo, Missouri, United States
Lorain, Ohio, United States
Milpitas, California, United States
Wayne, Michigan, United States
Body and chassis
Class muscle (1960–1965, 1971–1977)
Mid-size (1966–1969)
Layout FR layout
Related Ford Falcon, Ford Maverick
Chronology
Successor Mercury Zephyr
Mercury Monarch

The Mercury Comet was an automobile produced by the Mercury division of the Ford Motor Company from 1960–1969 and 1971-1977 — variously as either a compact or an intermediate car.

The Comet was based on the compact Ford Falcon and later the Ford Maverick. As a Mercury, early Comets received better grade interior trim than concurrent Falcons, and a slightly longer wheelbase.

Relationship to the Edsel

The Comet was originally planned as an Edsel model. It was reassigned to Mercury dealerships after the demise of the Edsel marque, where it was marketed as a standalone product for 1960 and 1961 as the Comet.

Developed concurrently with the Ford Falcon, early pre-production photographs of the sedan show a car remarkably close to the Comet that emerged, but with a split grille following the pattern established by Edsel models. Early Ford styling mules for the station wagon model carried the Edsel name as well.

At their debut, the split grille was replaced by one more in keeping with Mercury’s design themes. However, the canted elliptical taillights, first seen on the Edsel prototype, were used and carried the “E” (Edsel) part number on them. While the short lived 1960 Edsels used elliptical shaped taillights, the lenses used on both cars differed in length and width. Certain other parts from the 1959 Edsel parts bin, including the parking lights and dashboard knobs, were used on the first-year Comet. Keys for the 1960 and 1961 Comets were shaped like Edsel keys, with the center bar of the “E” removed to form a “C”.

1960–1965

Overview

From 1960-1965, the Comet was based on