AMBULANCES part V international Ambulances on Alphabet from D

AMBULANCES D:

Dacia 1300 Ambulance

Dacia 1300 Ambulance  DACIA Logans, Dusters, Dokker + 13(20)

1950 DAF A10 Ambulance

Leyland-Daf 400 V8 1991 Ambulance by ‘Mountain’

DAF – DAF Leyland – YA – Trucks – DAF Sherpa – Army

DAIMLERS from WWI + later

De Dietrich Ambulances van 1900, 1902 +1912

Delauny Belleville Ambulances 1907-1918

  1959 Dennis Lomas ambulance

tpt transport bus minibus double decker coach ambulance dennis

Dennis Brothers – Dennis – Lomas bodybuilders Ambulances

1954 Desoto Weller Special Ambulance Service Wagon

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DeSoto or De Soto Ambulances + Hearses + Limo Ambulances 1938 – 1958

DKW Schnellaster – F 800- Munga

Dodge -Dodge Brothers – Dodge Dart Ambulances

MAYBACH cars

Maybach

Maybach
Division
Industry Automotive
Fate Absorbed by Mercedes-Benz as a sub-brand
Successor Mercedes-Maybach
Founded 1909
Founder Wilhelm Maybach
Headquarters Stuttgart, Germany
Products Luxury vehicles
Owner Daimler AG
Parent Daimler AG
Website Maybach

Maybach SW 42, 1939

Maybach Motorenbau (German pronunciation: [ˈmaɪ.bax]) is a defunct German car manufacturer that today exists as a sub-brand of Mercedes-Benz. The company was founded in 1909 by Wilhelm Maybach and his son, originally a subsidiary of Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH and was itself known as Luftfahrzeug-Motorenbau GmbH until 1912.

In 1960, Maybach was acquired by Daimler-Benz. The brand returned as a standalone ultra-luxury car brand in the late 20th century, sharing significant components with Mercedes-Benz. After slow sales, the Maybach name returned once again as a sub-brand of Mercedes-Benz, which is owned by Daimler AG. Daimler currently produces an ultra-luxury edition of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class under the Mercedes-Maybach brand.

1909–1940: Early history

Early poster with double M logo

Wilhelm Maybach was technical director of the Daimler-Motoren-Gesellschaft (DMG) until he left in 1907. On 23 March 1909 he founded the new company, Luftfahrzeug-Motorenbau GmbH (literally “Aircraft Engine Building Company”), with his son Karl Maybach as director. In 1912 they renamed it to Maybach-Motorenbau GmbH (“Maybach Engine Construction Company”). The company originally developed and manufactured diesel and petrol engines for Zeppelins, and then rail cars. Its Maybach Mb.IVa was used in aircraft and airships of World War I.

The company first built an experimental car in 1919, introduced as a production model two years later at the Berlin Motor Show. Between 1921 and 1940, the company produced a variety of opulent vehicles, now regarded as classics. The company also continued to build heavy-duty diesel engines for marine and rail purposes.

Maybach had a British subsidiary, Maybach Gears Ltd, that specialised in gearboxes. In 1938 in conjunction with Dr Henry Merritt they produced a gearbox and steering system – the ‘Merritt-Maybach’ – for the abortive Nuffield A.16E1 Cruiser tank design.

1940–1945

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 Captured Sturmgeschütz III assault gun, derived from the Panzer III medium tank, also made by Maybach, at the Bulgarian National Museum of Military History

During the Second World War, Maybach produced the engines for Nazi Germany‘s medium and heavy tanks such as the Panzer IV, and the Tiger I (Maybach HL230) and Tiger II (Maybach HL230), as well as the light tank, Panzer II. The engine plant was one of several industries targeted at Friedrichshafen.

After WW II the factory performed some repair work, but automotive production was never restarted, and some 20 years later, the company was renamed MTU FriedrichshafenDaimler-Benz purchased the company in 1960. Post-1960 the company was mainly used to make special editions of Mercedes cars in the W108 and W116 model range, which were virtually hand built. These cars however carried the Mercedes badge and serial numbers.

1960s

Rolls-Royce Power Systems AG based in Friedrichshafen used to manufacture the commercial Maybach diesel engines under the MTU brand through its subsidiary MTU Friedrichshafen GmbH.

1997–2013

Maybach 62

Maybach 57

Daimler presented a luxury concept car at the 1997 Tokyo Motorshow. A production model based on it was introduced in two sizes – the Maybach 57 and the Maybach 62, reflecting the lengths of the automobiles in decimetres. In 2005, the 57S was added, powered by a 6.0 L V12 bi-turbo engine producing 450 kW (603 hp) and 1,000 N·m (738 lbf·ft) of torque, and featuring various cosmetic touches.

To promote the new Maybach line, Mercedes-Benz engaged figures such as Maybach heir Ulrich Schmid-Maybach and golfer Nick Faldo, to serve as brand ambassadors.

Initially, Daimler-Chrysler predicted annual sales of 2,000 worldwide with 50 per cent coming from the United States; however, these expectations never materialized. In 2007, Mercedes bought back 29 US dealers, reducing the total from 71 to 42. In 2010, only 157 Maybachs were sold worldwide, compared to 2,711 similarly priced Rolls-Royces. Just 3,000 have been sold worldwide since the brand was revived in 2002.

Daimler announced in November 2011 that Maybach would cease to be a brand by 2013 and manufactured the last Maybach vehicle in December 2012. This was because of poor sales.

Cancellation

With poor sales expectations and the heavy impact of the 2007-08 financial crisis, Daimler AG undertook a complete review of the Maybach division, approaching Aston Martin to engineer and style the next generation of Maybach models along with the next generation of Lagondas. According to Automotive News, only 44 Maybachs had been sold in the U.S. through October 2011.

An article in Fortune noted that Mercedes had missed out on the chance to purchase Rolls-Royce and Bentley when they were up for sale in the 1990s:

“Mercedes backpedaled and decided it needed to be in the ultra-luxury business too, but it went after it in a remarkably clumsy way.”

It further stated that the first Maybach models had poor driving dynamics compared to its contemporaries from Rolls-Royce and Bentley:

“Mercedes took an aging S-class chassis and plopped an absurdly elongated body on it … rather than develop a new car from the wheels up, as BMW did with Rolls-Royce, or cleverly use the underpinnings of an existing model like the Volkswagen Phaeton for a new Bentley.”

Furthermore, Maybachs were never advertised as owner-driven vehicles, as the company believed that the luxury amenities would be sufficient to drive sales, and they even insisted that auto journalists (who usually test drive the vehicle) ride in the backseat.

Another suggestion for Maybach’s struggles was that parent Daimler had failed to differentiate it from its Mercedes-Benz brand. While all three ultra-luxury marques share platforms and engines with other luxury brands from their parent auto company, Maybachs are built alongside the Mercedes-Benz S-Class flagship sedan, whereas Rolls-Royce and Bentley are assembled in England (separate from the rest of BMW and Volkswagen Group‘s respective production plants), and thus are regarded as being more “exclusive”. Furthermore, the Maybach’s pedigree was virtually unknown outside of Germany, unlike its British rivals which have long enjoyed renown worldwide; indeed the 2006 Rolls-Royce Phantom‘s interior evokes memories of a 1930s car while the Maybach 57S’s inside makes no reference to its marque’s history.

In November 2011, Daimler’s CEO Dieter Zetsche announced that the Maybach-brand would cease to exist in 2012, making room for other models of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class. The Maybach-limousines were still being sold up to the year 2013, but after that, the name “Maybach” would not be used anymore. On 14 August 2012, parent Daimler AG announced the official discontinuation of Maybach by releasing a price sheet officially discontinuing the Maybach 57, 57S, 62, 62S and Landaulet. On 17 December 2012, the last Maybach-vehicle was manufactured in Sindelfingen.

2015–present

Revival

The company announced that the line would be replaced by the next-generation of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class, Model W222, due for the 2014 model year, particularly the long wheelbase S-Class Pullman. An executive told a Frankfurt newspaper that “Daimler came to the conclusion that the sales chances for the Mercedes brand were better than that of Maybach.”

Mercedes-Maybach

In November 2014, Daimler announced the revival of the Maybach as sub brand of the Mercedes-Benz S-Class (W222), positioned as an upscale version akin to the more sporty Mercedes AMG sub brand. In anticipation of its April 2015 launch, the flagship Mercedes-Maybach S600 was unveiled at car shows in Los Angeles, United States and Guangzhou, China, and the production model at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show.

Assembled on the same Sindelfingen line used for the S-Class, the model is targeted against the Bentley Flying Spur and Rolls-Royce Ghost. At 5.453 metres (17.89 ft) long with a wheelbase of 3.365 metres (11.04 ft) (132.5 inches), approximately 20 centimetres (7.9 in) longer than the long-wheelbase S-Class models. The Mercedes-Maybach will be available as S500 (S550 in the US) and S600 models, with 4matic all-wheel-drive optional with the V8 engine. Acceleration is 0 to 60 miles per hour (0 to 97 km/h) in 5.0 seconds. The base car has several colour finish options and the choice between a three-seat rear bench, or two seats reclining. Options include: air-conditioned, heated and massaging seats; heated armrests; system to pump scented, ionised air around the cabin; and a 1540 watt Burmester 3D surround sound system with 24 speakers. Maybach S500 assembly in Pune, India, began in September 2015, making India the second country to produce a Maybach.

Concept cars

The first Mercedes-Maybach concept car is the Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6, a large 2-door coupe with fully electric drivetrain. The model was unveiled at the 2016 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

Models

Pre-war

1938 Maybach SW 38

1919 Maybach W1: Test car based on a DMG chassis

1921 Maybach W3: First Maybach, shown at Berlin Motor Show. Featured a 70 hp (52 kW) 5.7L inline six.

1926 Maybach W57L inline six, 120 hp (89 kW)

1929 Maybach 12V12 precursor to DS7/8

1930 Maybach DSH: Doppel-Sechs-Halbe (“half a twelve cylinder”) 1930–37

1930 Maybach DS7 Zeppelin: 7L V12, 150 hp (112 kW)

1931 Maybach W6: Same engine as W5, longer wheelbase. 1931–33

Die Eröffnung der großen Internationalen Automobilausstellung am Kaiserdamm in Berlin ! Der schönste und teuerste deutsche Wagen auf der Ausstellung. Der große “Maybach Zeppelin” mit seiner interessanten Stromlinienführung kostet 43000 Mark. Er erreicht spielend eine Stundengeschwindigkeit von 200 Km.

1931 Maybach DS8 Zeppelin: 8L V12, 200 hp (150 kW)

1934 Maybach W6 DSG: Featuring a twin overdrive transmission system.

1935 Maybach SW35: 3.5L 140 hp (104 kW) I6

1936 Maybach SW38: 3.8L 140 hp (104 kW) I6

1939 Maybach SW42: 4.2L 140 hp (104 kW) I6

1945 Maybach JW61: 3.8L 145 hp (108 kW) I6

https://youtu.be/qeLdcItG11c

W2 were the 5.7 L inline six engines built for and ordered by Spyker. Not all were purchased, and Karl had to build cars featuring the engines to offset costs.

Around 1800 Maybachs were built before WW II.

Engines

Maybach HL120

Maybach HL116

Maybach HL210

Maybach HL230

Post-revival

2005 Maybach Exelero (prototype shown at the IAA in Frankfurt)
2005 Maybach 57S (the S standing for Special rather than Sport)

2009 Maybach 57 Zeppelin and Maybach 62 Zeppelin

2011 Maybach Guard

2014 Mercedes-Maybach S600

2015 Mercedes-Maybach S500

Mercedes-Maybach S 600 Pullman2015 Mercedes-Maybach S600 Pullman

2018 Mercedes-Maybach G 650 Landaulet

Performance

The Maybach 57 accelerates from 0 to 60 mph (0 to 97 km/h) in about 5.1 seconds; the Maybach 62 and 57 S, about 4.8 seconds; the Maybach 62 S and the Landaulet in 4.5 seconds. This rapid acceleration is noteworthy for cars weighing well over 6,000 pounds (2.7 metric tons). Maybachs in general are extremely powerful: the 57 has 518 bhp (386 kW; 525 PS); the 57 S, 559 bhp (417 kW; 567 PS); the 62, 570 bhp (425 kW; 578 PS); the 62 S, 612 bhp (456 kW; 620 PS), and the Landaulet, 633 bhp (472 kW; 642 PS).

Features

Options for the Maybach 62 and 62S included 18-way power rear seats (replacing 14-way), power side and rear sunshade curtains, cooled rear seats, wireless headphones, electrochromic panoramic sunroof with solar panel for vehicle-off ventilation (replacing two choices of power sunroof) and interior partition with power, electrochromic glass divider.

Maybach Foundation

Maybach I and II, two World War II bunker complexes named after the engines.

Museum for Historical Maybach Vehicles

Maybach Brand Review

All Maybach pictures in my picturecollection:

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SONY DSC
SONY DSC

Zur Eröffnung der großen Berliner Automobil-Ausstellung am Kaiserdamm. Blick in die Ausstelungshalle der Luxusautos.

Die Eröffnung der großen Internationalen Automobilausstellung am Kaiserdamm in Berlin ! Der schönste und teuerste deutsche Wagen auf der Ausstellung. Der große “Maybach Zeppelin” mit seiner interessanten Stromlinienführung kostet 43000 Mark. Er erreicht spielend eine Stundengeschwindigkeit von 200 Km.

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2005 Maybach Exelero top car rating and specifications

Mercedes-Maybach S 600 Pullman

Mercedes-Maybach S 600 Pullman Guard. ;
Mercedes-Maybach S 600 Pullman Guard.;

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Maybach Rim
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References

  1. Jump up^ “Wilhelm Maybach”Forvo, the pronunciation dictionary. Retrieved 24 August 2012.
  2. Jump up^ Tschampa, Dorothee (11 November 2014). “Mercedes Revives Maybach Name to Challenge Rolls-Royce”Bloomberg.
  3. Jump up^ “Workshop Manual: Tiger Tank Panzerkampfwagen VI Ausf. E (SdKfz 181)”, David Fletcher, David Wiley, et. al, Haynes in conjunction with The Tank Museum, 2011, p.19.
  4. Jump up^ Hodzic, Muamer (19 March 2007). “Nick Faldo is the new Maybach brand ambassador”. BenzInsider.com. Archived from the original on 8 March 2009. Retrieved 24 August 2012.
  5. Jump up^ Mack, Eric. “DaimlerChrysler Turns Profit on $300,000 Maybach”. Edmunds.com. Retrieved 3 November 2011.
  6. Jump up^ “Can Maybach Be Mended?”. Automobile.automotive.com. Retrieved 23 November 2011.
  7. Jump up^ John Neff RSS feed. “Mercedes-Benz buys back and closes 29 Maybach dealers”. Autoblog.com. Retrieved 23 November 2011.
  8. Jump up to:a b “Mercedes puts Maybach out of its misery”. CNN. 28 November 2011.
  9. Jump up^ “Maybach is Dead, Long Live Mercedes”. Top Gear. BBC Worldwide: 29. January 2012.
  10. Jump up^ “Stilles Ende einer Autolegende”Tagesschau.de. 25 November 2011.
  11. Jump up^ Taylor III, Alex (28 November 2011). “Mercedes puts Maybach out of its misery”CNN Money. Archived from the original on 22 April 2014. Retrieved 22 April 2014.
  12. Jump up^ Johnson, Drew (13 June 2011). “Daimler to rule on future of Maybach next month”. Leftlanenews.com. Retrieved 23 November 2011.
  13. Jump up to:a b Fuhrmans, Vanessa (8 August 2011). “A Handful of Maybachs Isn’t Enough”The Wall Street Journal.
  14. Jump up^ “Daimler To Discontinue Maybach Brand in 2013”. 28 November 2011.
  15. Jump up^ Valdes-Dapena, Peter (22 March 2006). “Rolls-Royce vs. Maybach”CNN.
  16. Jump up^ “Traditionsmarke: Daimler beendet Maybach-Ära (in German)”ftd.de. 25 November 2011.
  17. Jump up^ “Maybach Comes To A Quiet End”. insideline.com. 14 August 2012. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  18. Jump up^ Pretzlaff, Harry (30 December 2012). “Ende der Luxusmarke: Für den Maybach war nichts zu teuer (in German)”stuttgarter-zeitung.de.
  19. Jump up^ Hetzner, Christiaan (25 November 2011). “Daimler pulls plug on loss-making Maybach – paper”. Thomson Reuters. Retrieved 25 November 2011.
  20. Jump up^ “2016 Mercedes-Maybach S600 Sedan”. Mbusa.com. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  21. Jump up^ “Maybach is back! Mercedes revamps car naming structure”. Autoexpress.co.uk. 11 November 2014. Retrieved 11 November2014.
  22. Jump up^ “Mercedes-Maybach Pullman S600 limo to debut at Geneva auto show”. Autonews. Retrieved 19 February 2015.
  23. Jump up to:a b Holder, Jim (13 January 2015). “2015 Mercedes-Maybach S600 – prices, specification and gallery”. Autocar. Retrieved 16 January 2016.
  24. Jump up^ Turkus, Brandon (19 November 2014). “Mercedes-Maybach S600 is not the luxury limo we expected”Autoblog.com. Retrieved 2 December 2014.
  25. Jump up^ “Mercedes-Maybach S-Class: Stylish, effortless superiority combined with trend-setting exclusivity” (Press release). Mercedes-Benz. 19 November 2014. Retrieved 2 December 2014.
  26. Jump up^ Neil, Dan (February 7, 2015). “Mercedes-Maybach S600: The Silence Is Deafening”. The Wall Street Journal. p. D11.
  27. Jump up^ “Mercedes-Maybach S500 and S600 Launched in India”. Archived from the original on 2015-10-03.
  28. Jump up^ “Mercedes-Maybach S 500 and S 600 Launched in India”. Archived from the original on 2015-10-08.
  29. Jump up^ “Vision Mercedes-Maybach 6 concept coupe previews 2017 production car”Auto Express. 19 August 2016. Retrieved 19 August 2016.
  30. Jump up^ “2004 Highest Year on Record for Mercedes-Benz USA”. Theautochannel.com. Retrieved 2011-11-23.
  31. Jump up^ “Mercedes-Benz Rings in the New Year with Record 2006 Sales”. Theautochannel.com. Retrieved 2011-11-23.
  32. Jump up^ “Mercedes-Benz USA’s Sales Drop 32.1 Percent In December 2008”. Emercedesbenz.com. 2009-01-05. Retrieved 2011-11-23.
  33. Jump up^ “Mercedes-Benz Posts Highest Sales Month for the Year With 20,025 Vehicles Sold in December – MONTVALE, N.J., Jan. 5 /PRNewswire/”. New Jersey: Prnewswire.com. 2010-01-05. Retrieved 2010-04-05.
  34. Jump up^ “Highest Sales Month for the Year at 21,469 Brings Mercedes-Benz to an..” New Jersey: Prnewswire.com. 4 January 2011. Retrieved 2011-11-23.

External links

Maybach Comes to a Quiet End

Maybach Manufaktur

The Maybach Museum (in German)

A biography of Wilhelm Maybach (in German)

Technical information about Maybach engines in the Tiger I tank

Maybach Foundation

“Lockers Hold Spare Wheel Of Stream Line Auto”Popular Mechanics, October 1932, a streamlined auto made in co-operation with Junkers engineers, only one built

Maybach 900

Source: http://aboutcarsreviews.com/maybach-s600-and-900/

Maybach S600 and 900All About Cars, 2016

JAGUAR Cars Whitley, Coventry, England, UK at start now from Tata Motors India III

JAGUAR Cars

2012 Logo of Jaguar Cars, released in 2012


Whitley, Coventry, England, UK at start now from Tata Motors India III

Sports

1949 Jaguar-xk-120
  • Jaguar XK120
  • fastest production car in the world in 1949

Jaguar XK120

Jaguar XK120
Jaguar XK120

Jaguar XK120 Drop Head Coupe
Overview
Manufacturer Jaguar Cars
Production 1948–1954
12,055 made
Assembly Holbrook Lane, Coventry, England,United Kingdom (1948-1951)
Browns Lane, Coventry, England,United Kingdom (1951-54)
Body and chassis
Class Sports car
Body style 2-seat roadster (OTS)
2-seat coupé
2-seat drophead coupé
Layout FR layout
Related Jaguar C-Type
Powertrain
Engine 3.4 L XK I6
Dimensions
Wheelbase 102 in (2,591 mm)
Length 173 in (4,394 mm)
Width 61.5 in (1,562 mm)
Height 52.5 in (1,334 mm)
Chronology
Predecessor Jaguar SS100
Successor Jaguar XK140

The Jaguar XK120 is a sports car which was manufactured by Jaguar between 1948 and 1954. It was Jaguar’s first sports car since the SS 100, which ceased production in 1940.

History

The XK120 was launched in open two-seater or (US) roadster form at the 1948 London Motor Show as a testbed and show car for the new Jaguar XK engine. The display car was the first prototype, chassis number 670001. It looked almost identical to the production cars except that the straight outer pillars of its windscreen would be curved on the production version. The roadster caused a sensation, which persuaded Jaguar founder and design boss William Lyons to put it into production.

Beginning in 1948, the first 242 cars wore wood-framed open 2-seater bodies with aluminium panels. Production switched to the 1cwt or 112 lb (51 kg) heavier all-steel in early 1950. The “120” in the name referred to the aluminium car’s 120 mph (193 km/h) top speed (faster with the windscreen removed), which made it the world’s fastest production car at the time of its launch. In 1949 the first production roadster, chassis number 670003, was delivered to Clark Gable.

1949 Jaguar XK120 Roadster Clark Gable

The ex-Clark Gable XK120 at the 2012 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance

The XK120 was ultimately available in two open versions, first as an open 2-seater described in the US market as the roadster (and designated OTS, for open two-seater, in America), then also as a drophead coupé (DHC) from 1953; and also as a closed, or fixed head coupé (FHC) from 1951.

A smaller-engined version 2-litres, 4 cylinders, intended for the UK market was cancelled prior to production.

On 30 May 1949, on the empty Ostend-Jabbeke motorway in Belgium, a prototype XK120 timed by the officials of the Royal Automobile Club of Belgium achieved an average of runs in opposing directions of 132.6 mph with the windscreen replaced by just one small aeroscreen and a catalogued alternative top gear ratio, and 135 mph with a passenger-side tonneau cover in place. In 1950 and 1951, at a banked oval track in France, XK120 roadsters averaged over 100 mph for 24 hours and over 130 mph for an hour, and in 1952 a fixed-head coupé took numerous world records for speed and distance when it averaged 100 mph for a week.

Roadsters were also successful in racing and rallying.

Construction

1950 Jaguar XK120 interior

1950 aluminium-bodied roadster, ex-Clemente Biondetti, has competition seats and aftermarket steering wheel; positions of tachometer and speedometer have been reversed

The first roadsters, hand-built with aluminium bodies on ash frames mounted on modified Jaguar Mark V chassis, were constructed between late 1948 and early 1950. To meet demand, and beginning with the 1950 model year, all subsequent XK120s were mass-produced with pressed-steel bodies. They retained aluminium doors, bonnet, and boot lid. The DHC and FHC versions, more luxuriously appointed than the roadsters, had wind-up windows and also wood veneers on the dashboard and interior door caps.

With alloy cylinder head, hemi-spherical combustion chambers, inclined valves and twin side-draft SU carburetors, the dual overhead-cam 3.4 L straight-6 XK engine was comparatively advanced for a mass-produced unit of the time. With standard 8:1 compression ratio it developed 160 bhp (119 kW), using 80 octane fuel. Most of the early cars were exported; a 7:1 low-compression version, with consequently reduced performance, was reserved for the UK market, where the post-war austerity measures then in force restricted buyers to 70 octane “Pool petrol”. The Jaguar factory, with access to 80 octane fuel, provided roadsters with the higher compression ratio to the press. Journalists could then test the model’s optimum performance in Belgium, on a long, straight stretch of road between Jabbeke and Ostend. The XK engine’s basic design, later modified into 3.8 and 4.2 litre versions, survived into the late 1980s.

All XK120s had independent torsion bar front suspension, semi-elliptic leaf springs at the rear, recirculating ball steering, telescopically adjustable steering column, and all-round 12 inch drum brakes that were prone to fade. Some cars were fitted with Alfin (ALuminium FINned) brake drums to help overcome the fade.

1951 XK120 racing at Silverstone

1951 XK120 roadster racing at Silverstone has a single aeroscreen mounted behind the removable full-width windscreen

The roadster’s lightweight canvas top and detachable sidescreens stowed out of sight behind the seats, and its barchetta-style doors had no external handles; instead there was an interior pull-cord which was accessible through a flap in the sidescreens when the weather equipment was in place. The windscreen could be removed for aeroscreens to be fitted.

The drophead coupé (DHC) had a padded, lined canvas top, which folded onto the rear deck behind the seats when retracted, and roll-up windows with opening quarter lights. The flat glass two-piece windscreen was set in a steel frame that was integrated with the body and painted the same colour.

Dashboards and door-caps in both the DHC and the closed coupé (FHC) were wood-veneered, whereas the more spartan roadsters were leather-trimmed. All models had removable spats (“fender skirts” in America) covering the rear wheel arches, which enhanced the streamlined look. On cars fitted with optional centre-lock wire wheels (available from 1951), the spats were omitted as they gave insufficient clearance for the chromed, two-eared Rudge-Whitworth knockoff hubs. Chromium plated wire wheels were optional from 1953. When leaving the factory it originally fitted 6.00 × 16 inch cross ply tyres on 16 × 5K solid wheels (Pre–1951). Later cars could also specify 185VR16 Pirelli Cinturato tyres as a radial option.

In addition to wire wheels, upgrades on the Special Equipment, or SE, version (called the M version in the United States) included increased power, stiffer suspension and dual exhaust system.

Performance

The Motor magazine road-tested an XK120 roadster in November 1949. This pre-production car, chassis number 670001, road-registered as HKV 455, was the first prototype built. It was also the 1948 London Motor Show display model, and had been driven by Prince Bira in the 1949 Silverstone Production Car Race. When tested, it had the 8:1 compression ratio, was fitted with an undertray, and ran with hood and sidescreens in place. The magazine reported a top speed of 124.6 mph (200.5 km/h), acceleration from 0–60 mph (97 km/h) in 10.0 seconds and fuel consumption of 19.8 miles per imperial gallon (14.3 L/100 km; 16.5 mpg-US). The car as tested cost £1263 including taxes.

Racing and rallying

XK120s were active in racing and rallying:

1949

  • First race victory: In the Daily Express-sponsored One-Hour Production Car Race held on 30 August 1949 at Silverstone Circuit, England, Leslie Johnson drove the Jabbeke car to the XK120’s first-ever race victory (despite an early collision with a spinning Jowett Javelin which dropped the Jaguar to fifth). The car, road-registered HKV 500, was converted to right-hand drive for Silverstone. Two other XK120s took part. One, driven by Peter Walker, finished second and the other, driven by Prince Bira, spun out of contention when a tyre punctured.

1950

  • First victory in America: In January 1950 Johnson also scored the model’s first competition success in America, winning the production class in a race at Palm Beach Shores, Florida with the car that had finished second at Silverstone. The Jaguar lost its brakes but finished fourth overall. John Lea, Jaguar’s Experimental Department mechanic who attended the race, reported: “The conditions at Palm Beach were wet, windy and sandy. Water and sand gained entry into the brake drums at the front, and the mixture had the effect of accelerating the wear very considerably. Our car finished with no linings and with the steel shoes bearing on the brake drums.”
  • Pebble Beach Cup: In May, XK120s driven by Phil Hill and Don Parkinson finished first and second in this event at the inaugural Pebble Beach Road Races in 1950.

In 1950 Jaguar allocated six alloy-bodied XK120s to drivers Johnson, Walker, Nick Haines, Clemente Biondetti, Ian Appleyard and Tommy Wisdom.

  • Le Mans: Three of the allocated cars, extensively modified, entered the 1950 Le Mans 24 Hours race. Johnson, who spearheaded this factory-supported assault on the race with co-driver Bert Hadley, never ran lower than seventh place, and held second for two hours, but in the 21st hour had to retire from third place with clutch failure caused by using the gears to slow the car in the absence of brakes. (As a result the clutch was revised to a more robust design for production models.) The Jaguar had been closing the gap to leader Louis Rosier, whose Talbot’s pace was significantly slower, at a rate that would have secured victory. Haines, with co-driver Peter Clark, finished 12th, and Walker’s car, driven by Peter Whitehead and John Marshall, was 15th. The results convinced William Lyons it was worth investing in future success at Le Mans.
  • Mille Miglia: Johnson took fifth place in the Mille Miglia, with John Lea as his riding mechanic, while Biondetti and co-driver Gino Bronzoni finished eighth. Fifth was an outstanding achievement for a production car, with Johnson’s Jaguar beaten only by Fangio‘s works Alfa Romeo and the works Ferraris of Serafini, Bracco and winner Marzotto. It was Jaguar’s best-ever finish in the Mille Miglia; also the best by a British car and driver combination, a feat that only Reg Parnell ever equalled, driving an Aston Martin DB3 in 1953.
  • Silverstone Production Car Race: Five XK120s entered the race, which Peter Walker won from Tony Rolt, with Johnson recovering to eighth after spinning on oil. Jaguar won the team prize.
  • Tourist Trophy: XK120s also achieved a 1–2–3 victory in the TT, held at Dundrod in heavy rain. On the eve of his 21st birthday Stirling Moss drove Tom Wisdom’s car to a brilliant win ahead of Whitehead and Johnson, and Jaguar once again took the team prize.
1950 Jaguar XK120 roadster

This 1950 XK120 roadster won a Coupe des Alpes and a Coupe d’Or

  • Alpine Rally: Ian Appleyard’s XK120, road-registered as NUB 120, won the Alpine Rally with his wife Pat, who was the daughter of Sir William Lyons, navigating. They also won a coveted Coupe des Alpes.

1951

  • Alpine Rally: NUB 120 and the Appleyards repeated their previous year’s success.
  • Tulip Rally: The Appleyards took first place in the Tulip Rally, with Swiss fighter pilot Rolf Habisreutinger’s XK120 finishing second.

1952

  • Alpine Rally: Although the Appleyards’ XK120 did not win its third Alpine, it completed the rally without incurring a single penalty point, winning the first-ever Coupe d’Or (Gold Cup).

1954

  • NASCAR road race: In America, an XK120 FHC was the first imported car to achieve victory in NASCAR, when Al Keller won the first NASCAR road race, held at Linden Airport, New Jersey, on 13 June 1954.

High-speed runs and records

1949

  • 132.596 mph (213.393 km/h) through the flying mile: in May, Jaguar demonstrated an XK120 roadster to the press on the high-speed autoroute between Jabbeke and Aeltre in Belgium. The road was closed for the occasion. The white left-hand drive car, chassis number 670002, was the second XK120 built. Jaguar’s development engineer Walter Hassan was to have driven but fell ill, so Jaguar test-driver Ron “Soapy” Sutton substituted. With hood and sidescreens erected, and the airflow under the car improved by the addition of a full-length aluminium undertray, the Jaguar was timed through the flying mile by the Royal Automobile Club of Belgium at 126.448 mph (203.498 km/h). With hood, sidescreens and windscreen removed, a metal airflow deflector fitted in front of the driver, and a tonneau cover fastened over the passenger side of the cockpit the speed improved to 132.596 mph (213.393 km/h). The Observer’s Book of Automobiles said it was the fastest production car in the world.

1950

  • 107.46 mph (172.94 km/h) for 24 hours (including stops for fuel and tyres): Leslie Johnson sharing his XK120 roadster, road-registered JWK 651, with Stirling Moss at the Autodrome de Montlhéry, a steeply banked oval track near Paris. The first time a production car had averaged over 100 mph (160.93 km/h) for 24 hours. Changing drivers every three hours, the Jaguar covered 2579.16 miles, with a best lap of 126.2 mph (203.10 km/h).

1951

  • 131.83 mi (212.16 km) for one hour: Johnson solo in JWK 651 at Montlhéry. “No mean feat…driving at almost twice today’s maximum (UK) speed limit into a steep turn, assaulted by the G-Force induced by 30 degree banking twice every minute, using Forties technology, leaf spring suspension and narrow crossply tyres…Johnson remarked that the car felt so good it could have gone on for another week, an off-the-cuff comment that sowed the seed for another idea. Flat out for a week…”
1952 Jaguar XK120 fixed-head coupė averaged 100 mph for a week

This 1952 XK120 fixed-head coupė averaged 100 mph for a week

1952

  • 100.31 mph (161.43 km/h) for 7 days and 7 nights, again at Montlhéry: XK120 fixed-head coupé driven by Johnson, Moss, Hadley and Jack Fairman. William Lyons, mindful of the considerable kudos and advertising mileage that had already accrued from Johnson’s exploits, commandeered a brand new XK120 FHC for him: bronze-colored, and fitted with wire wheels, it was Jaguar chief engineer Walter Hassan‘s car, the second right-hand drive coupé made. The car broke a spring on the track’s rough concrete surface when already well into the run. No spare was carried, and regulations stipulated that a replacement from outside would make the car ineligible for any further records beyond those already achieved before the repair. Johnson drove nine hours to save the other drivers from added risk while the speed had to be maintained on the broken spring. When he finally stopped to have it replaced, the car had taken the world and Class C 72-hour records at 105.55 mph (169.87 km/h), world and Class C four-day records at 101.17 mph (162.82 km/h), Class C 10,000-kilometer record at 107.031 mph (172.250 km/h), world and Class C 15,000-kilometer records at 101.95 mph (164.07 km/h), and world and Class C 10,000-mile (16,000 km) records at 100.65 mph (161.98 km/h). After the repair the car went on to complete the full seven days and nights, covering a total of 16,851.73 mi (27,120.23 km) at an average speed of 100.31 mph (161.43 km/h).

Jaguar XK100

A 2-litre four-cylinder version of the twin cam XK engine was to have powered an XK100 variant of the XK120 for the UK market. Details of the model were included in an “Advance Particulars” brochure for the XK  but Jaguar’s managers were dissatisfied with the engine and the project was cancelled prior to production.

Note

  1. Jump up^ The Times, 31 May 1949
    Ostend 30 May: British Car’s Speed Record
    (extracts)
    A Jaguar 3½-litre sports car . . . travelled at a timed speed of 132 mph on the Ostend-Jabbeke motorway today . . . The runs were timed by officials of the Royal Automobile Club of Belgium . . . moreover it was running on normal Belgian pump petrol and at the end of its high speed runs it demonstrated its ability to throttle down to 15 mph in top gear and to accelerate speedily without pinking. Running with the hood up, the car averaged 126.4 mph for a mile in two runs in opposite directions. The fastest mean speed of 132.5 mph was reached with a racing windscreen in place, the best run being made at 133.2 mph. The car also covered a kilometre from a standing start at a speed of 74.1 mph and a mile at 86.4 mph.

Jaguar XK140

Jaguar XK140
1954 XK140 open two-seater or roadster

XK140 open two-seater or roadster 1954
Overview
Manufacturer Jaguar Cars
Production 1954–1957
Body and chassis
Class Sports car
Body style 2-seat roadster
2-seat convertible
2-seat coupé
Layout FR layout
Dimensions
Length 176 in (4,470 mm)
Width 64.5 in (1,638 mm)
Curb weight 3,136–3,248 lb (1,422–1,473 kg)
Chronology
Predecessor Jaguar XK120
Successor Jaguar XK150

The Jaguar XK140 is a sports car manufactured by Jaguar between 1954 and 1957 as the successor to the XK120. Upgrades included more interior space, improved brakes, rack and pinion steering, increased suspension travel, and telescopic shock absorbers instead of the older lever arm design.

History

The XK140 was introduced in late 1954 and sold as a 1955 model. Exterior changes that distinguished it from the XK120 included more substantial front and rear bumpers with overriders, and flashing turn signals (operated by a switch on the dash) above the front bumper.

Emblem Jaguar XK 140

Boot emblem

The grille remained the same size but became a one-piece cast unit with fewer, and broader, vertical bars. The Jaguar badge was incorporated into the grille surround. A chrome trim strip ran along the centre of the bonnet (hood) and boot (trunk) lid. An emblem on the boot lid contained the words “Winner Le Mans 1951–3″.

Jaguar XK140(cropped)

Roadster rear

1956 Jaguar XK 140

Open two-seater or roadster interior 1956 showing waterproof leather fascia

Jaguar XK140 Drophead coupé interior

Drophead coupé interior

1955 LA2 Jaguar XK 140 DHC rear

Drophead coupé 1955

Jaguar XK140 fixed head coupé

Fixed head coupé

The interior was made more comfortable for taller drivers by moving the engine, firewall and dash forward to give 3 inches (76 mm) more legroom. Two 6-volt batteries, one in each front wing were fitted to the Fixed Head Coupe, but Drop Heads and the Open Two Seater had a single 12-volt battery. This was installed in the front wing on the passenger side (e.g. In the left wing on right hand drive cars and in the right wing on left hand drive).

The XK140 was powered by the Jaguar XK engine with the Special Equipment modifications from the XK120, which raised the specified power by 10 bhp to 190 bhp (142 kW) gross at 5500 rpm, as standard. The C-Type cylinder head, carried over from the XK120 catalogue, and producing 210 bhp (157 kW) gross at 5750 rpm, was optional equipment.

When fitted with the C-type head, 2-inch sand-cast H8 carburettors, heavier torsion bars and twin exhaust pipes, the car was designated XK140 SE in the UK and XK140 MC in North America.

In 1956 the XK140 became the first Jaguar sports car to be offered with automatic transmission. As with the XK120, wire wheels and dual exhausts were options, and most XK140s imported into the United States had wire wheels. Cars with the standard disc wheels had spats (fender skirts) over the rear wheel opening. When leaving the factory it originally fitted either 6.00 × 16 inch crossply tyres or you could specify 185VR16 Pirelli Cinturato CA67 as a radial option on either 16 × 5K½ solid wheels or 16 × 5K (special equipment) wire wheels.

Body styles

The Roadster (designated OTS – Open Two Seater – in America) had a light canvas top that folded out of sight behind the seats. The interior was trimmed in leather and leatherette, including the dash. Like the XK120 Roadster, the XK140 version had removable canvas and plastic side curtains on light alloy barchetta-type doors, and a tonneau cover. The door tops and scuttle panel were cut back by two inches(50mm) compared to the XK120, to allow a more modern positioning of the steering wheel. The angle of the front face of the doors (A-Post) was changed from 45 degrees to 90 degrees, to make access easier.

The Drophead Coupé (DHC) had a bulkier lined canvas top that lowered onto the body behind the seats, a fixed windscreen integral with the body (the Roadster’s screen was removable), wind-up side windows, and a small rear seat. It also had a walnut-veneered dashboard and door cappings.

The Fixed Head Coupé (FHC) shared the DHC’s interior trim and rear seat. The prototype Fixed Head Coupe retained the XK120 Fixed Head roof-profile, with the front wings and doors the same as the Drophead. In production, the roof was lengthened with the screen being placed further forward, shorter front wings, and longer doors. This resulted in more interior space, and more legroom.

Performance

Realistically, a stock XK-140 SE could achieve a top speed of 120–125 mph (193–201 km/h). Road & Track ’​s XK-140 MC test in June 1955 recorded a best two-way average of 120.3 mph (193.6 km/h). Best one-way run was 121.1 mph (194.9 km/h). Sports Cars Illustrated ’​s test of the same model in Aug 1957 had a fastest two-way average of 121 mph (195 km/h). Their best one-way run was 124 mph (200 km/h). Karl Ludvigsen’s test published in Sports Car World (July 1957) had the same results as the SCI test.

Acceleration times from 0–60 mph (97 km/h) were 8.4 seconds, 9.1 seconds and 9.1 seconds respectively. Only the R&T test tried 0–100 mph (160 km/h) which took 26.5 seconds. Standing 1/4 mile (~400 m) times were 16.6 seconds (82 mph (132 km/h) approx) and 16.9 seconds (86 mph (138 km/h)).

Jaguar XK150

Jaguar XK150
1958 Jaguar XK150 Roadster

1958 Jaguar XK150 Roadster
Overview
Manufacturer Jaguar Cars
Production 1957–1961
Assembly Coventry, England
Body and chassis
Class Sports car
Body style 2–3 seater coupé
2–3 seater convertible
2 seater roadster
Layout FR layout
Powertrain
Engine 3442 cc(210CID) I6
3781 cc I6
Dimensions
Wheelbase 2,591 mm (102.0 in)
Length 4,496 mm (177.0 in)
Width 1,580 mm (62.2 in)
Kerb weight 2,968 lb (1,346 kg)
Chronology
Predecessor Jaguar XK140
Successor Jaguar E-type

The Jaguar XK150 is a sports car produced by Jaguar between 1957 and 1961. It replaced the XK140.

Initially it was available in Fixed Head Coupé (FHC) and Drophead Coupé (DHC) versions. The Roadster (XK150 OTS – Open Two-Seat) was launched in 1958. Minimal rear seats were fitted in the coupés.

History

Although bearing a family resemblance to the XK120 and XK140, the XK150 was radically revised. A one-piece windscreen replaced the split screen, and the wing line no longer dropped so deeply at the doors. The widened bonnet opened down to the wings, and on the Roadster the windscreen frame was moved back 4 inches (102 mm) to make the bonnet longer. The car was available at various times in Red, Pearl Grey, White, Indigo Blue, Claret, Cotswold Blue, Black, Mist Grey, Sherwood Green, Carmen Red, British Racing Green, Cornish Grey, and Imperial Maroon.

The XK140’s walnut dashboard was replaced by one trimmed in leather. On the early Drophead Coupés, the aluminium centre dash panel, which was discontinued after June 1958, had an X pattern engraving similar to the early 3.8 E-type. Thinner doors gave more interior space. On the front parking lights, which were located atop the wings (fenders), a little red light reminded the driver the lights were on.

Suspension and chassis were very similar to the XK140, and steering was by rack and pinion; power steering was not offered. The standard engine, the similar to the XK140, but with an new “B” type cylinder head, was the 3.4 litre DOHC Jaguar straight-6 rated at 180 SAE bhp at 5750 rpm but most cars were fitted with the SE engine whose modified cylinder head (B type) and larger exhaust valves boosted the power to 210 SAE bhp at 5500 rpm. Twin 1.75-inch (44 mm) SU HD6 carburettors were fitted.

While the first XK150s were slower than their predecessors, the deficit was corrected in the spring of 1958 with a 3.4-litre “S” engine whose three 2-inch (51 mm) SU HD8 carburettors and straight-port cylinder head increased power to a claimed 250 SAE bhp.

For 1960, the 3.4 litre engine was bored to 3.8 litres, rating this option at 220 hp (164 kW; 223 PS) in standard tune or 265 hp (198 kW; 269 PS) in “S” form. A 3.8 litre 150S could top 135 mph (217 km/h) and go from 0–60 mph in around 7.0 seconds. Fuel economy was 18mpg.[3] Four-wheel Dunlop 12 in (305 mm) disc brakes appeared for the first time although it was theoretically possible to order a car with drums. When leaving the factory the car originally fitted either 6.00 × 16 inch Dunlop Road Speed tyres as standard, or you could specify 185VR16 Pirelli Cinturato CA67 as a radial option on either 16 × 5K½ solid wheels (basic models) or 16 × 5K wire wheels.

Production ended in October 1960, and totalled 2265 Roadsters, 4445 Fixed Head Coupés and 2672 Drophead Coupés.

Performance

A 250 bhp 3.4 litre XK150S Fixed-Head Coupé with limited slip differential was tested by The Motor in 1959. It had a top speed of 132 mph (212 km/h) and could accelerate from 0–60 mph (97 km/h) in 7.8 seconds. Fuel consumption of 22.0 miles per imperial gallon (12.8 L/100 km; 18.3 mpg-US) was recorded. The test car cost £2110 including taxes of £623. It was at the time the fastest closed car the magazine had ever subjected to a full road test.

Photographs