AC (Auto Carriers Ltd) Cars West Norwood, London, England, UK 1901 till now first edition

1903 AC Auto Carrier Finney Isles & Company Limited Auto-Carrier, Brisbane

AC Cars

AC Cars Group Ltd.
Private
Industry Automotive
Founded West Norwood, London,United Kingdom (1901)
Founder The Weller Brothers
Headquarters Thames Ditton, Surrey, United Kingdom
Key people
Alan Lubinsky, current owner
Products Automobile
Parent ACEDES Holdings
Website AC Cars official page

AC Cars Ltd. formerly known as Auto Carriers Ltd., is a British specialist automobile manufacturer and one of the oldest independent car makers founded in Britain.

History

1914 AC Ten horsepower open two seater 4-wheeled car

 AC 10 open 2-seater
AC’s first 4-wheeled car

1926 AC 12 Royal drophead coupé AC Royal Anzani KL

 AC 12 Royal drophead coupé 1926

1927 AC 16 Royal saloon mfd 1991cc

 AC 16 Royal saloon 1927

1939 AC 16-80 open 2-seater 1939 body by March Sport

 AC 16/80 open 2-seater 1939
body by March

The first car from what eventually became AC was presented at the Crystal Palace motor show in 1903; it was a 20 HP touring car and was displayed under the Weller name. The Weller Brothers of West Norwood, London, planned to produce an advanced 20 hp (15 kW) car. However, their financial backer and business manager John Portwine, a butcher, thought the car would be too expensive to produce and encouraged Weller to design and produce a little delivery three-wheeler. Weller did so, called it the Auto-Carrier, and a new company was founded and named Autocars and Accessories; production started in 1904. The vehicle caught on quickly and was a financial success. In 1907, a passenger version appeared, called the A.C. Sociable. It had a seat in place of the cargo box. The A.C. Sociable was described in a review of the 1912 Motor Cycle and Cycle Car Show as one of the most popular cycle cars on the road, both for pleasure and business, and A.C. displayed eight vehicles on their stand, six for pleasure and 2 for business. The single rear wheel contained a two-speed hub, and the single cylinder engine was mounted just in front of it, with rear chain drive.

pictures:

1903 auto carrier 1908 AC Sociable 5-6 hp 1910 auto carrier sociable 1914 AC Ten horsepower open two seater 4-wheeled car 1921 AC Sprint 1922 AC Boat Tail 1924 AC Racing Special 1924 AC Royal Roadster 1926 AC 12 Royal drophead coupé AC Royal Anzani KL 1927 AC 16 Royal saloon mfd 1991cc

The company became Auto Carriers Ltd. in 1911 and moved to Ferry Works, Thames Ditton, Surrey—at this time they also began using the famed “AC” roundel logo. Their first four-wheeled car was produced in 1913; it was a sporty little two-seater with a gearbox on the rear axle. Only a few were built before production was interrupted by the first World War.

pictures:

1931 AC 16-56 four-door saloon 1932 AC 16-56 Magna Coupe 1933 AC Ace 16-56 1934 AC 16-56 Greyhound Saloon with sliding roof 1934 1934 AC Ace 16-56 Drophead Coupe cost £435 1934 AC Two Door Saloon 1935 AC 16-66 1935 AC 16-70 Sports Drophead Coupé 1935 AC 2000 Sport-Special 1936 AC 16 56

During the Great War, the Ferry Works factory produced shells and fuses for the war effort, although at least one vehicle was designed and built for the War Office. At the end of the First World War, AC Cars started making motor vehicles again, designing and building many successful cars at Ferry Works, as well as expanding into an old balloon factory on Thames Ditton High Street.

pictures:

1936 AC 16-70 2 litre Drop head Coupe 1936 AC advert 1937 AC 16-50 coupe 1937 AC ace 1938 AC 16-60 greyhound saloon 1938 AC 16-80 Sports Car 1938 AC 16-80 two-seater sports competition 1938 ac 1938 1939 AC 2litre 6cyl sports 1939 AC 2-litre saloon

After the war, John Weller started on the design of a new overhead-cam 6-cylinder engine. The first versions of this design were running by 1919. The Weller engine would be produced until 1963; it is possibly the second-longest-lived production motor in history after the Volkswagen boxer. In 1921, Selwyn Edge (who had been with Napier & Son) bought shares in the company and was appointed governing director. He did not get along with Weller or Portwine, who resigned less than a year later. In 1922, the name changed again to AC Cars Ltd.

pictures:

1939 AC 16-80 open 2-seater 1939 body by March Sport

1939 AC 16-80 tourer 1947 AC dhc 1947 AC saloon 1947-56 AC 2-Litre UK 1947-56 AC 2-Litre UKa 1948 AC '49 advert 1948 AC sport saloon 1949 AC 2litre saloon 1949 AC Bookland Tourer

In customary fashion Edge sought publicity for the company through motoring competition. In 1921 Sammy Davis joined A.C. as a driver, competing in the Junior Car Club 200-mile (320 km) race, for cars up to 1,500 c.c., atBrooklands. In 1923  and 1924  J.A. Joyce won the Brighton Speed Trials driving an A.C. In May 1924, at Montlhéry, near Paris, T. G. Gillett broke the continuous 24-hour record in a 2-litre A.C., fitted with special streamlined bodywork, covering a distance of 1,949.3 miles. In 1926 the Honourable Victor Bruce, an AC employee, won the Monte Carlo Rally in his 2-litre AC. In 1927, Victor Bruce, with his wife Mildred (The Hon Mrs Victor Bruce), assisted by J.A. Joyce, set a 10-day endurance record at Montlhéry, driving an AC Six.

pictures:

1949 AC Drophead Coupé 1949 AC Sports Tourer by Buckland 1949 ac-twolitre-1950-8 1949 Seven of the 28 Southend Pier Railway cars, built by AC-Cars in 1949 train along pier2 1950 AC 2litre saloon 1950 ac-twolitre-1 1950 ac-twolitre-2 1950 ac-twolitre-1950-2 1950 ac-twolitre-1950-6 1951 AC buckland

Selwyn Edge bought the company outright for £135,000 in 1927 and re-registered it as AC (Acedes) Ltd but sales, which had been falling, continued to decline. The company was caught by the crash of 1929 and went into voluntary liquidation. Production ceased for a time, and the company was sold to the Hurlock family who ran a successful haulage business. They wanted the High Street factory only as a warehouse (Ferry Works was not acquired), but allowed the service side of AC to continue.

pictures:

1952 AC 2-Litre Saloon 1952 AC ac sedan 1952 AC buckland sports 1991cc 1952 AC buckland sports tourer mk i 1952 AC petite 1952 AC saloon 4dr 1953 AC 2 Liter Sport Saloon 1953 AC 2 litre saloon 1953 AC ace prototype 1953 AC petite 1954 AC 2litre convert 1954 AC 2litre saloon 1954 AC Ace (2) 1954 AC ace

A single car was made for William Hurlock in 1930. He liked it and agreed to restart very limited production, mainly using components left over from previous models. An agreement was reached with Standard to supply new chassis, the ancient three-speed transaxle was replaced by a modern four-speed gearbox (built in unit with the engine), and by 1932 a new range of cars was finally launched. Production continued on this small scale, averaging less than 100 vehicles per year, until the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939. The final pre-war car was delivered in June 1940, after which the factory was fully involved with war production.

After the Second World War

1976 AC Invalid Carriage a

 While the company’s sporting cars won plaudits from many enthusiasts, it was the long-running contract with the UK government for the production of three-wheeled invalid carriages that may have most impressed those concerned for the company’s financial stability.

1955 AC-2litre UK

 A.C. 2-Litre 1947-1956.

The four-door configuration and the wider 6.75 × 16 inch wheels identify this as a later example. The flashing indicators will have been retro-fitted.

1958 AC Ace roadster with AC engine

 1958 AC Ace, AC engined

1949 Seven of the 28 Southend Pier Railway cars, built by AC-Cars in 1949 train along pier2

 Seven of the 28 Southend Pier Railway cars, built by AC-Cars in 1949

1957 AC Aceca Bristol prepared for the Carrera Panamericana Mexican road race

 1957 AC Aceca Bristol prepared for the “Carrera Panamericana” Mexican road race

1962 AC Greyhound Saloon

 A.C. Greyhound Saloon 1962

1959 AC single-seater at Motor Sport at the Palace, Crystal Palace (circuit) 27 May 2013AC

 1959 AC single-seater at Motor Sport at the Palace, Crystal Palace (circuit) 27 May 2013

Production of cars restarted in 1947 with the 2-Litre using the 1991 cc engine from the 16, and also a large contract with the government to produce the fiberglass-bodied, single seat, Thundersley Invacar type 57 invalid carriages with BSA engines. The 2-Litre used an updated version of the pre-war underslung chassis fitted with the AC straight-six and traditional ash-framed and aluminium-panelled saloon or convertible coachwork. The invalid carriages continued to be built until 1976 and were an important source of revenue to the company. They also built an aluminum-bodied three-wheeled microcar, the Petite. They also produced “Bag Boy” golf carts (with independent suspension to the two wheels!). In 1949, AC Cars also produced four trains, each consisting three power cars and four coaches, for the Southend Pier Railway in Essex. These remained in use until 1976.

In 1953, the firm began production of the

1962 AC Ace 2.6 Ruddspeed front

AC Ace

, based on a lightweight chassis designed by John Tojeiro and Hand built Aluminium Body designed and built by Eric George Gray with the venerable Weller-designed 2-Litre engine. Soon after, car dealer and racing driver Ken Rudd fitted his own competition Ace with a pre-war BMW-designed, Bristol-produced 135 bhp (101 kW) six-cylinder engine. This combination was put into production as the AC Ace-Bristol in 1957. In this form, the car raced at Le Mans in 1957 and 1958.

For 1954, a new aluminum-bodied closed coupe was unveiled at Earls Court, the

1957 AC Bristol Aceca rear

This is the coupe version of the AC Ace that Carroll Shelby used as the basis for his AC Cobra.
This is the coupe version of the AC Ace that Carroll Shelby used as the basis for his AC Cobra.

AC Aceca.

It was only slightly heavier than the convertible Ace, and because of better aerodynamics was actually slightly faster (128 mph (206 km/h) top speed). Only 328 Acecas were produced, and they were equipped with either of the Ace’s engines. There was a demand from some customers for a larger four-seater car, for whom AC produced the

1962 AC Greyhound Saloon 1962 AC Greyhound

Greyhound.

This was built on a stretched Ace chassis with coil suspension all around and a 2.2-litre Bristol engine.

In 1961, Bristol stopped producing their own engines—and once again, Ken Rudd came to the rescue, suggesting that AC use a 6-cylinder engine from the Ford Zephyr. These engines when fitted with the Raymond Mays twelve-port alloy head and Weber carburetors could be made to produce a safe 170 bhp (127 kW) and a 125 mph (201 km/h) top speed. The AC Ace 2.6 (as it is latterly known today) is for many people the prettiest Ace of all—and undoubtedly the rarest, with only 37 such cars built. To fit the Zephyr engine, AC had to modify the frame, relocate the steering box and completely change the nose of the car. These changes are often mistakenly attributed to Carroll Shelby.

pictures:

1954 AC eca bristol 2 1955 AC ace may ad 1955 AC petite 1955 AC-2litre UK 1956 AC ace 1956 AC advert 1956 AC petite2 october 1957 AC ace bristol le mans 1957 AC ace bristol 1957 AC Aceca Bristol prepared for the Carrera Panamericana Mexican road race 1957 AC advert 1957 AC Bristol Aceca rear 1957 AC lav93 1957 AC petite mk II 1958 AC ACE 2000ccm90PS

Today, Acecas are popular at historic racing events. Arch McNeill, a factory Morgan racer from the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s told fellow Texan and Aceca owner Glenn Barnett that “the Morgan team spent two years campaigning to beat the factory AC Acecas and finally did in the late 1950s”. Though more valuable than comparable AC or Shelby replicas, the Aceca is still a bargain when compared to a Shelby CSX Cobra, while maintaining similar performance.

pictures:

1958 AC ace bristol 1958 AC Ace roadster with AC engine 1958 AC aceca coupe

This is the coupe version of the AC Ace that Carroll Shelby used as the basis for his AC Cobra.
This is the coupe version of the AC Ace that Carroll Shelby used as the basis for his AC Cobra.

1959 AC ace bristol 1959 AC ace 1959 AC aceca Bristol 1959 AC bristol lemans 1959 AC single-seater at Motor Sport at the Palace, Crystal Palace (circuit) 27 May 2013AC 1960 AC greyhound int 1960 AC greyhound rear 1960 AC Greyhound 1961 AC 2,6litre 1961 AC Aceca Coupe 1962 AC Ace 2.6 Ruddspeed front

The company also ventured briefly into railway rolling stock business, building five four-wheel railbuses for British Rail in 1958.

Carroll Shelby and the Cobra

1965 AC Cobra MkII 427

 Cobra Mark II 427 1965

In 1962, AC was approached by Carroll Shelby to use a small block Ford V8 engine in the Ace chassis, producing the AC Cobra. Shelby needed a car that could compete with the Chevrolet Corvette in US sports car racing. The resulting Cobra was a very powerful roadster, and it is commonly blamed for the introduction of the 70 mph (110 km/h) limit on British motorways. While this was a major factor in the decision, after a coupe version was caught doing 196 mph (315 km/h) during a test run, a then-recent spate of accidents under foggy conditions also helped the introduction of the limit.

pictures:

1962 AC cobra 260 london 1962 AC Greyhound Saloon 1962 AC Greyhound 1963 AC greyhound 1964 AC cobra 289 competition 1965 AC 427convertible oct 1965 AC Cobra 427 1965 AC Cobra 6504 1965 AC Cobra MkII 427 1966 AC 427 convertible 1966 AC 428 Convertible 1966 AC cobra 427 ghia 1966 AC cobra 427 s-c 1966 csx1000andstaff 1967 AC 428 coupe

At the end of the 1964 racing season, the Cobra was being outclassed in sports car racing by Ferrari. Carroll Shelby decided he needed a bigger engine. A big block Ford FE series 390 V8 was installed in a Cobra and the result was scary—the car was virtually undrivable. It was decided that a completely new chassis was needed. With the combined help of Ford’s computers and the experience of the AC engineers, the new MKIII was born with 4-inch (100 mm) main tubes instead of 3-inch (76 mm) for the chassis, huge cross-braced shock towers and coil springs all around. This, along with a bigger 427 ci version of the FE, made the new AC Cobra MKIII an absolutely unbeatable 2,200 lb (1,000 kg) race car. Specifically, the engine that was installed in the car was Ford’s famed 427 FE NASCAR “Side-Oiler” V8, a power-house engine developing 425 bhp (317 kW) in its mildest street version. Unfortunately, the car missed homologation for the 1965 season and was not raced by the Shelby team. However, it was raced successfully by many privateers and went on to win races all the way into the 1970s. The AC 427 Cobra, although a commercial failure when in production, has now become one of the most sought-after and replicated automobiles ever.

pictures:

1967 AC Cobra 289 1968 AC 428 coupe 1968 AC 428 Frua 1968 AC 472 cabrio 1968 AC cobra 1968 AC Frua coupé, quarter 428 1969 AC 428 Fastback-Coupe-2 1969 AC 428 1969 AC Cobra 428 coupé 1969 ac-289-10 1970's AC ME300 1972 AC Frua Roadster 1973 AC 428 Frua at Earls Court 1973 AC Frua at Earls Court-MJ retouched 1975 AC Invacar

It was produced in two versions: a street model with a tamer motor, optional dual carburetors, a glove box, and exhaust running under the car, and a competition version with a stripped interior, no glove box, different instrument layout and revised suspension. The competition version also had a more powerful motor with only one carburetor, side exhausts, a roll bar and wider fenders to accommodate racing tires. At the end in 1966, Shelby was left with 31 unsold competition cars; he decided to sell them to the general public under the name of Cobra 427 S/C or Semi-Competition. Today these S/C cars are the most sought after models and can sell in excess of 1.5 million dollars.

Carroll Shelby sold the Cobra name to Ford in 1965 and went on to develop the famed racing Ford GT40.

Meanwhile, AC went on producing a milder version of the 427 MK III Cobra for the European market fitted with the small block Ford motor. The car was called the AC 289 and 27 were produced.

AC 428 or Frua and AC 429

1973 AC Frua at Earls Court-MJ retouched

 AC 428 Frua

1972 AC Frua Roadster

 1971 AC Frua

At the same time, the company realized they needed a grand tourer model that could appeal to wealthy customers. AC contacted the famed Italian coach builder Pietro Frua to design an appealing GT body that could be fitted on a MKIII Cobra chassis stretched by 6 inches (150 mm). The new car was shown at the 1965 Turin show. A few early models were fitted with the famed 427 Ford FE motors. In 1967 the long-stroked 428 motor became available and the car was known as the AC Frua. Built out of steel rather than AC’s usual aluminum, the Frua is heavier than a Cobra at slightly under 3,000 lb (1,400 kg). That said, it is still a light and very fast automobile built on a racing chassis. The car was never fully developed and the cost of sending chassis from England to Italy and back for final assembly made it so expensive that only a few were produced. Production ended in 1973 after only 80 cars (29 convertibles and 51 coupes) were finished.

pictures:

1979 AC 3000ME Yellow 1976 AC Invalid Carriage a

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

2005 AC Schnitzer ACS5 Sport M5 E60 2012 AC 378 GT Zagato rear 2012 AC 378 GT Zagato

AC 428 Convertible. Pietro Frua had first exhibited the Maserati Mistral at Turin in 1963, and when Derek Hurlock from AC Cars sent a Cobra MkIII chassis to Frua in 1965 it seems that he borrowed heavily from the Mistral for the AC 428 Fastback and later convertible.
AC 428 Convertible. Pietro Frua had first exhibited the Maserati Mistral at Turin in 1963, and when Derek Hurlock from AC Cars sent a Cobra MkIII chassis to Frua in 1965 it seems that he borrowed heavily from the Mistral for the AC 428 Fastback and later convertible.

AC Ace AV Bristol Roadster orange AC Ace AC Car AC Cars Cobra AC Cars logo AC Cobra 428, and 345 bhp AC Cobra MKII 289 AC Cobra MKIII 427 replique Shelby

In 1970, a special version of the coupé was built. It was based on an extended bodyshell that Frua built for Monteverdi which was supposed to become the second Monteverdi 375/L. After the alliance of Monteverdi and Frua split off in Summer 1969, that bodyshell remained in the Frua works in Turin. A year or so later Frua changed some details on front and rear, including some semi-hidden headlamps which had been seen on the Iso Lele and the Iso Grifo, second series, before. The car was called AC 429; it remained a one-off.

3000ME

1979 AC 3000ME Yellow

 1979 AC 3000ME

The 1970s were not a good period for luxury car manufacturers and Derek Hurlock went searching for a totally new smaller car. Mid-engined designs were in fashion at the time and in 1972 the Diablo, a prototype with anAustin Maxi engine and transaxle, was built by privateers Peter Bohanna and Robin Stables. In much the same way as they had taken up the Tojeiro prototype and turned it into the Ace, AC acquired the rights and at the 1973 London Motor Show showed their own version, the mid-engined ME3000 with the 3.0-litre Ford Essex V6 engine installed transversely over a bespoke AC-designed gearbox. Development was virtually complete in 1976 when new Type Approval regulations were introduced. A prototype failed the 30 mph (48 km/h) crash test, and the chassis had to be redesigned. On the second attempt, the car passed with flying colours. This was a huge achievement for a tiny firm—Vauxhall had to make several attempts before the contemporary Chevette passed. For AC, such delays meant that the first production cars (now renamed 3000ME) were not delivered until 1979, by which time they were in direct competition with the Lotus Esprit. Although comfortable, brisk, nicely built and practical, AC’s ambitions of selling 250 cars per year were a distant memory. After just 71 cars were sold, Hurlock called a halt to production as his health was suffering and the company was struggling in the teeth of a recession. In 1984, production stopped at Thames Ditton and the car and the AC name were licensed to a new company registered as AC (Scotland) plc run by David McDonald in a new factory in Hillington, Glasgow. Here, 30 cars were built, including a development car tested with Alfa Romeo‘s 2.5-litre V6 engine and a nearly complete Mark 2 prototype of the same. Regardless (or possibly because) of these developments, AC Scotland called in the receivers in 1985. After selling the historic High Street works for redevelopment, AC themselves soldiered on as a service operation in the “21st Century” works on Summer Road until the Hurlock family finally sold their holdings in 1986 to William West. After some complex machinations the company was split between property interests and the car brand; the former was renamed and the latter was acquired by Brian Angliss.

Brian Angliss era

In 1982 Brian Angliss was running Autokraft, a Cobra restoration shop, parts supplier and replica manufacturer. To further such pursuits, he acquired some of the tooling from Thames Ditton and created the MKIV; the car had US-spec 5 mph (8.0 km/h) bumpers, a federalized motor, and a larger interior with modern switchgear. About 480 cars were produced in his factory at Brooklands. He also produced a lightweight model which was more in tune with the original Cobra spirit, though it could not be imported to the US due to Federal regulations.

pictures:

AC cobra-427 big 01 AC Cobra's in Thames Ditton works AC Frua 428Coupé PEFRTRIGHT AC ac-16-80-03

5.0.2
5.0.2

ac-289-04 AC-378-GT-Zagato-9 ac-428-09 ac-cars-mark-vi-02 ac-cobra-212-sc-04 ac-cobra-212-sc-05 ac-cobra-212-sc-06 ac-cobra-212-sc-10

Early cars were sold as the Autokraft MKIV but eventually Angliss acquired the rights to use the AC name. Derek Hurlock had been strongly protective of the name, but Angliss’ high standards of craftsmanship won him over. When the Hurlock family finally sold up in 1986 Angliss fully acquired the AC trademark rights and set up a new AC company as a joint venture with Ford, who had also recently bought Aston Martin. A big conflict followed over the future direction for AC, but Angliss eventually won his independence as well as Ford’s continuing and essential cooperation as an engine and parts supplier.

pictures:

ac-cobra-daytona-coupe-replica-02 ac-cobra-daytona-coupe-replica-03 ac-cobra-daytona-coupe-replica-04 ac-cobra-daytona-coupe-replica-05 ac-cobra-daytona-coupe-replica-06 ac-cobra-daytona-coupe-replica-07 ac-cobra-mk-iii-03 AC Cobra 427 MK III ac-cobra-mk-iii-10 ac-cobra-mk-iii-12 ac-cobra-replica-351-cu-in-01 ac-cobra-replica-351-cu-in-02 ac-invacar-01 ac-invacar-03 ac-invacar-04

Also interested in aircraft, Angliss restored a Hawker Hurricane XIIB at Brooklands as well as acquiring two ex–Indian Air Force Hawker Tempest IIs as future projects. The Hurricane was registered as G-HURR and was destroyed in a fatal accident at the Shoreham air show in 2007.

Angliss looked for a new car to complement and perhaps replace the MKIV. At the 1993 London Motor Show, he introduced a new vehicle that he named the AC Ace. It was a modern automobile with a stainless steel chassis and an aluminum body, but was expensive to develop and build. The costs hit Angliss hard and he sold his large motor bike collection, vintage Bentley and other assets to try to make ends meet. The receivers were called in by 1996 after approximately 50 “new” Aces had been built.

AC (1996–present)

In March 1996, largely due to the cost of developing the new Ace, Angliss’ company went into receivership and was eventually sold to Pride Automotive in December 1996, who continued car production in Weybridge, Surrey under the name of AC Car Group Ltd. The AC trademarks and intellectual property were transferred to Acedes Holdings, LLC. Both the Cobra Mk IV and the Ace were made, and soon a ‘CRS’ version of the Mk IV was announced with a carbon fibre body shell, a 212 S/C version with Lotus twin turbo V8 power, as well as the AC Superblower with a supercharger Ford V8. Two or three closed Aceca coupe versions of the Ace were also made.

pictures:

ac-invacar-06 ac-invacar-07 ac-invacar-10 ac-invacar-11 ac-invacar-type-57-01 ac-invacar-type-57-09 AC-Mamba ac-petite-01 ac-petite-02 ac-petite-03 ac-petite-04 ac-petite-06 ac-petite-09 ac-petite-10 AC's 428 Grand Tourer Automobilhersteller_AC_Logo.svg

In 2003, Carroll Shelby International and AC Motor Holdings, Ltd. announced production of an authentic Shelby/AC Cobra, with the production vehicle arriving at dealers in July 2004. Initially, available models included Shelby AC 427 S/C Cobra and Shelby AC 289 FIA Cobra, which would be branded as the CSX 1000 and CSX 7500 Series, respectively. In February 2004, the first handcrafted aluminum body shell was built.

Due to rising costs in the UK, AC relocated to Malta in 2005 and started production of the carbon-fibre bodied AC MkV. Due to problems with the factory building, production ceased in 2007.

In 2007, AC announced a joint venture with Brooklands Motor Company (the spiritual successor of Autokraft) in Weybridge, Surrey, UK and confirmed plans for the continuation of the traditional AC designed tubular chassis and aluminium bodied models.

AC Heritage seem to be the owners of certain models, as their website lists two, both of the original design. More importantly, because their models are made in the “origin” country of where AC Cars started over a century ago, then the heritage of these cars is retained. Whereas, the model made in Germany would not follow the heritage of company, and so would not be an “authentic” AC branded car, much like a Ferrari would not be seen as a “genuine” Ferrari if it were made in China. Their website reveals their adherence to the history of the company.

In April 2009, a joint venture in Germany was announced to manufacture the new AC MKVI. Following a supply deal with GM, the AC MKVI had a totally new spaceframe chassis, 6.2 litre V8 engine and 6-speed manual transmission, and new Corvette brakes, retaining the original shape in lightweight composite material with the moulds taken from an original AC MKIII body. Following extensive development the car went into series production in July 2012 after two years of intense prototyping.

In 2010, AC announced a joint venture with the USA-based company Iconic which resulted in the design of the ultimate “Cobra”: the “Iconic AC Roadster”.

Acedes Holdings, LLC is the current owner of AC Cars.

At the Geneva Motor Show in 2012, AC Cars showed three different models: the AC MK VI, AC MK II, and

2012 AC 378 GT Zagato rear 2012 AC 378 GT Zagato

AC 378 GT Zagato.

Car models

Type Engine Approx Production Year Notes
Autocarrier 648 cc single-cylinder air-cooled 1904–1914 Three-wheeler goods carrier with single wheel at rear and driver behind the load. Chain drive to rear wheel via two-speed epicyclic gearbox.
AC Sociable 648 cc single-cylinder air-cooled Possibly 1800 1907–1914 Passenger version of the Auto Carrier from 1907 with driver and passenger side by side (2-seater) or driver behind (3-seater).
AC Ten 1096 cc four-cylinder water-cooled About 100 1913–1916 Engine made by Fivet of France. Transmission by Transaxle (combined rear axle and gearbox). Two-seater and dickey or Sports two-seater. Optional 1327 cc engine pre war, standard post war.
AC 12 hp 1478/1992 cc four-cylinder water-cooled Approx 850 including six-cylinder models to 1929 1920–1927 Engine made by Anzani or later Cubitt in Aylesbury. Transmission by three-speed transaxle. Two- or four-seater bodies.
AC Six (16/40, 16/56 and 16/66) 1478/1991 cc six-cylinder water-cooled Approx 850 including 12 hp models to 1929 plus 50 assembled from parts 1930–33. 1920–1929 Engine made by A.C. Larger capacity from 1922. 16/66 had triple SU carburetors. Transmission by 3-speed transaxle. Two- or four-seater bodies.
AC Six (16/60, 16/70, 16/80 and 16/90) 1991 cc six-cylinder water-cooled 618 1932 to 1940 1932–1940 Engine made by AC; 16/90 was supercharged with an Arnott blower. Transmission by four-speed ENV, Moss synchromesh or Wilson pre-selector gearbox. Longer and wider than previous Six. Chassis overslung 1932-33, underslung 1933-1939, overslung 1939-1940.
AC 2-Litre 1991 cc six-cylinder water-cooled 1284 1947–1958 Engine made by A.C. Two- and four-door saloons, drophead coupé and tourer bodies.
AC Petite 350 cc single-cylinder two-stroke Approx 4000 1952–1958 Engine made by Villiers. Four-speed gearbox. Three-wheeler with single front wheel. Two/three-seater.
AC Ace 1991/1971 cc six-cylinder water-cooled 689 1953–1963 Engine made by AC or Bristol (1971 cc) from 1956 or Ford Zephyr engine (Later models). Two-seat aluminium open sports bodies.
AC Aceca 1991/1971/2553 cc six-cylinder water-cooled 357 1954–1963 Engine made by AC or Bristol (1971 cc) from 1956 or Ford (2553 cc) from 1961. Front disc brakes from 1957. Two-seat aluminium sports coupé bodies with hatchback.
AC Greyhound 1971/2216/2553 cc six-cylinder water-cooled 83 1959–1963 Engine from Bristol. De Dion rear suspension, (Some might have the AC Independent suspension). 2 plus 2 coupe bodies.
AC Cobra 260/289/AC289 4261/4727 cc V8 75/571/27 1962–1968 Legendary two-seat aluminum roadster. Ford small block V8 Engine. Four-wheel disk brakes. Early MK1 cars had cam and peg steering, later MK2 cars rack and pinion. Later AC 289 had AC 427 MK3 coil spring chassis & body with narrow fenders.
AC Cobra 427/428 6997/4948 cc V8 306 to 1966 1964-1966 1983-1990 MK3 series. A reworked AC Cobra designed for racing with coil springs all around and beefed up 4″ chassis tubes. Early cars had Ford FE 427 Engines, later cars fitted with less expensive 428 FE motors. Around 400 bhp (298 kW) or more depending on version, four-wheel disc brakes and rack and pinion steering. Aluminum-bodied two-seat roadster bodies.
AC Invacar 147 cc  ? 1960s–1977
AC Frua 6997/7016 cc V8 81 1965–1973 Frua body built on a six-inch (150 mm)stretched Cobra 427 Chassis Ford FE 428 400 bhp (298 kW) engine. four-wheel disc brakes. Manual or automatic transmission. Two-seat open or coupé, steel body built in Italy.
AC 3000ME 2994 cc V6 Ford ‘Essex’ 101 full production cars 1979–1985 Transverse mid-engined with five-speed AC gearbox. Platform chassis with front and rear subframes, GRP body.
AC Brooklands Ace 4601/4942 cc V8 1993–1996 Engine made by Ford. 4942 cc version supercharged.
AC Ace V8 4601/4942 cc V8 1997–2000 Engine made by Ford. 4942 cc version supercharged. Chassis made in South Africa, bodies in Coventry.
AC Aceca 4601/4942 cc V8 1998–2001 Engine made by Ford. 4942 cc version supercharged. Four-seat coupé version of the Ace. Chassis made in South Africa, bodies in Coventry.
AC 212 S/C 3506 cc V8 Twin Turbo Lotus Engine 2 cars 2000 Car built in Brooklands, Surrey.
AC MK VI 6.2 V8 2009– Corvette sourced engine. Car assembled by Gullwing in Germany (eventually by Hi-Tech Automotive in South Africa)
AC MK II 6.2 V8 2012– Corvette sourced engine. Car assembled by Brooklands Motor Company in UK (Aluminium body) or by Hi-Tech Automotive in South Africa (composite body)
AC 378 GT Zagato 6.2 V8 2012– First shown as Perana Z-One in 2009. Car built in South Africa by Hi-Tech Automotive.

See also

References

  1. Jump up^ “The Motor Cycle and Cycle Car Show at Olympia”, The Auto Motor Journal, 30th Nov, 1912, p1448
  2. Jump up^ Eric Dymock, Writing a page of history, The Guardian, January 13, 1981, Page 21.
  3. Jump up^ The Light Car and Cyclecar, July 20, 1923 “A.-C. MAKES FAST TIME”; The Autocar, July 20, 1923; Brighton & Hove Herald, July 21, 1923; Motor Sport, April 1955, Page 191: “Sprint Results of the Nineteen-Twenties” lists the overall winner on July 14, 1923 as J.A. Joyce (A.C.). The event was restricted to cars up to 1,500 c.c. and run as a knockout competition in six classes. J.A. Joyce won the top class for cars up to 1,500 c.c. of any type. No times were published.
  4. Jump up^ The Motor, September 9, 1924, Page 250;The Light Car and Cyclecar, September 12, 1924, Page 486; The Autocar, September 12, 1924, Page 469; The Brooklands Gazette, October 1924, Page 168.
  5. Jump up^ The Brooklands Gazette, December 1924, Page 248 for a photograph of J.A. Joyce.
  6. Jump up^ Montlhéry: The Story of the Paris Autodrome, William Boddy, 2007, Page 26.
  7. Jump up^ The Illustrated Directory of Classic Cars, Graham Robson, Salamander Books, 2001.
  8. Jump up^ Montlhéry: The Story of the Paris Autodrome, William Boddy, 2007, Pages 58-59.
  9. Jump up^ Casucci, Piero. “City Cars: The Answer to the World’s Traffic Problems?”, in Northey, Tom, ed. World of Automobiles (London: Orbis, 1974), Vol. 4, p.383.
  10. Jump up^ Advert in “Country Life” April 27, 1951, page 1304.
  11. Jump up^ “Transport Miscellany article on the Southend Pier Railway”. Greywall Productions. Archived from the original on 25 August 2010. Retrieved 2010-08-20.
  12. Jump up^ “AC COBRA: The AC Story”.
  13. Jump up^ “Frequently Asked Questions: When was the 70 mph (110 km/h) motorway speed limit introduced in Britain?”. Speedlimit.org.uk.
  14. Jump up^ “AC Heritage Ltd;”. acheritage.co.uk/. Retrieved 2010-06-26.
  15. Jump up^ accars.co.uk
  16. ^ Jump up to:a b c Robson, G (1974). A-Z of British Cars 1945-1980. Devon: Herridge. ISBN 0-9541063-9-3.
  17. Jump up^ “AC Cobra 212 S/C”. Supercars.net. 2000-10-17. Retrieved 2012-05-22.
  18. Jump up^ “AC Automotive – AC MkVI”. Accars.de. Retrieved 2012-05-22.
  19. ^ Jump up to:a b Fresh start for AC Cars, Daily Telegraph, May 28, 2012
  20. Jump up^ french leaflet from Geneva Motor Show
  21. Jump up^ Noah Joseph RSS feed. “Perana Z-One resurfaces with AC badge as 378 GT Zagato”. Autoblog.com. Retrieved 2012-05-22.

 

Other sources

External links

AC Cars has always been known as a very individualist manufacturer of very individualist cars, arguably the most notable being the 7-litre Ford V8-engined Model 428 in convertible and fast back forms, styled by Pietro Frua of Italy. The 428 was an expensive, luxury-type car of essentially limited production.

However, AC fortunes were founded on an infinitely more mundane vehicle sold in quantity over 100 years ago. The marque’s origins go back almost to the beginning of the 20th century, the joint founders being John Weller, talented engineer and designer, and John Portwine, a butcher, who financed him and handled the business side.

Weller’s first car was the 20 hp four-cylinder Weller, built at West Norwood, London, in 1903. It was of advanced design, making considerable use of aluminium to keep weight down. But the project never got under way owing to production and cost problems, and on Portwine’s suggestion a cheap, reliable three-wheeled commercial vehicle was designed and put into production instead.

This was called the Auto-Carrier which, right from its introduction in 631cc, single-cylinder-engined form in 1905, proved a considerable success. It had tiller steering and chain drive from the engine to the single rear wheel, which contained a Roe pattern epicyclic two-speed gear and clutch incorporated in the hub. A large number of London and provincial firms found Auto-Carriers far more efficient than horse-drawn carts, which were the common form of transport at the time, and orders flowed in.

To build them in quantity a new company named Autocars & Accessories Limited was formed, and with production under way Weller’s next step was to develop passenger-carrying versions of the original design. On the first of these the driver kept his seat in front of the rear wheel, with one or more passengers seated ahead of him in a forecar.

On later types the driver and passengers sat side-by-side in the forecar, tiller steering being retained. Late in 1907 Weller and Portwine reformed their business again as Auto-Carriers Limited, to build these new AC ‘Sociables’ alongside the commercials, all of them costing under £100. The first AC, then, was a three-wheeler, but success made the partners ambitious and, following removal in 1911 from West Norwood to a new factory in the pleasant riverside village of Thames Ditton, Surrey, John Weller got down to designing a four-wheeled car.

At first he tried fitting a two-wheeled rear axle to the Sociable, but the resultant cyclecar did not please him, so instead he laid down a new design. It was a true small car, unusual in having its three-speed gearbox integral with the rear axle, and incorporating a disc transmission brake at the back on the end of the propellor shaft – these becoming distinctive AC features for the next 16 years. Its engine was a Fivet, a neat French 1094 cc side-valve four-cylinder unit. Suspension was by transverse leaf spring at the front and quarter-elliptics at the rear, and by use of much aluminium the whole car in open two-seater form weighed only 10 cwt and could attain 45 mph.

John Weller’s Masterpiece, the AC ‘Light Six’ Engine

As announced in 1913, this first AC four-wheeler was notably pretty, with elegant curved wings, rounded-vee radiator, and a choice of wire or artillery wheels. It performed well and reliably, and, after the upheavals of World War 1, was continued in improved form. Supply of the Fivet engine became difficult, however, so AC employed the lively 1.5-litre, 69mm x 100 mm, Anzani four-cylinder side-valve unit instead, giving even better performance. Meanwhile, production of the tricars was dropped and John Weller produced his masterpiece, the AC ‘Light Six’ engine. First shown in 1919, and initially offered in 56mm x 10 mm 1.5-litre and 65 mm x 100 mm 2-litre forms, this was in full production as a 2-litre by 1921; it was a remarkably advanced and efficient power unit, giving about 40 bhp and having a single overhead-camshaft driven at first by a vertical shaft and helical gears.

Noise and manufacturing costs caused Weller to quickly to replace this by an endless inverted-tooth chain, controlled by what became known as the Weller spring-loaded tensioner, the patents for which were to earn the inventor some sizeable royalty fees. The engine also had wet cylinder liners in an aluminium block, and an aluminium sump, iron head and aluminium cam-cover, the whole being extremely attractive in appearance. The old engineering maxim ‘If it looks right, it is right’ certainly applied to the six-cylinder AC engine, which set records for longevity, basically the same unit being employed until 1963 – a span of over 40 years during which power output rose almost threefold to over 100 bhp.

The year 1921 brought big company changes, when the dynamic S. F. Edge, who had steered the Napier marque to fortune before World War 1, became a director. The following year he became Chairman and Governing Director, and the co-founders Weller and Portwine both resigned from their company, which changed its name to AC Cars Limited. Edge swiftly launched a racing and record-breaking programme, with four-cylinder 1.5-litre and six-cylinder 2-litre cars. The 1.5-litre cars, variously powered by side-valve Anzani, and overhead-camshaft eight and 16-valve engines evolved by Weller, set many highly impressive short and long-distancerecords at Brooklands, including several at over 100 mph, between 1921 and 1932.

The bigger sixes also figured prominently, one creating a new world 24-hour record in 1925 at Montlhery, France, averaging 82.58 mph. In December 1927, the Hon. Victor Bruce and Mrs Bruce broke the world 15,000-mile record at 68.01 mph, plus six other long-distance figures, despite appalling wintry weather and the loss of over 15 hours for repairs after the car overturned following a skid in the snow. It was the Hon. Victor Bruce, too, who scored the first British victory in the famous Monte Carlo Rally in 1926, sharing a 2-Iitre six with W. J. Brunei!.

1904 Auto Carrier
The first AC model was, naturally enough, the Auto Carrier. The image above is from a 1903 version, used as a delivery vehicle. The driver would steer from the rear courtesy of a ’tiller’, it being driven by a 20hp engine driving a single rear wheel via a chain.1910 Auto Carriers SociableThe image above is of one of the very first passenger carrying AC’s, directly converted from the original Auto Carrier. The firsr versions had the driver sitting behind the passengers, but this 1910 ‘Sociable’ version had the driver sitting next to the passengers.1921 AC Sprint
Now with 4 wheels, the 1921 AC Sprint would set many records atBrooklands.1921 AC 11.9 HP
By 1921 AC were not only building racing cars, but accomplished passenger four-seaters such as this 11.9.

1938 AC Racer
We uncovered this strange image of what we believe to be a 1938 AC, obviously highly modified by the looks of the rear wheels.

AC Buckland Sports
The AC Buckland Sports was an elegant five seater tourer fitted with a sweet 1991cc engine, first shown at the 1952 London Motor Show.

AC Thames Ditton Production Line
This rare archive image shows the AC Thames Ditton works in full production mode, with Cobra’s undergoing various stages of completion.

AC ME300
The AC ME300 began with the end of the Unipower story.

AC ME300

AC cars also scored numerous successes at Brooklands, and in hillclimbs and sprints, while a 1.5-litre car finished third in the I923 ‘200 Miles’ race despite delays through tyre trouble. Production of the four-cylinder 1.5-litre AC model was dropped after I927 and two years later S. F. Edge decided to retire. The company then went into voluntary liquidation and no cars were built between 1929 and I931. But two engineering brothers, William and Charles Hurlock, acquired AC Cars Limited in 1930 and began a cautious design revision.

First, they replaced the cantilever front springs by semi-elliptic. Their next step was to fit a 4-speed Moss gearbox in unit with the engine in place of the now outdated 3-speed unit on the rear axle. The chassis was now underslung at the rear and the resultant car, called the Ace, was very successful, one winning the 1933 RAC Rally, driven by Kitty Brunell, daughter of the 1926 Monte Carlo co-victor.

AC built their own coachwork at Thames Ditton, and produced a very individual range of bodies, ranging through open, drophead and closed 2-seaters to two and four-door coupes, convertibles and saloons, establishing the AC as one of the most handsome among the ‘middleclass’ sporting cars of the 1930S. They were lively, refined performers, and 60, 70 or 80 bhp variations of Weller’s famous ohc six were optional, while even an Arnott-supercharged version giving close on 90 bhp was offered.

AC Cars Limited was one of the first British makers to export cars to America, sending the first batch over in 1937 and exhibiting at the New York Show. World War 2 diverted AC’s activities away from motor cars until 1947, when the first post-war two-door AC saloon was announced. This was very much in the current styling idiom, with deep, valanced ‘helmet’ type wings merging with a wide bonnet containing an integral radiator grille and headlights.

Beneath this new shape was the faithful old Weller engine and non-independent semi-elliptic springing, but it now had lengthened springs, new tubular hydraulic shock absorbers and revised braking by Girling, hydraulically operated at the front and mechanically at the rear.

Those were the days of intensive exporting, and the Thames Ditton factory joined in, cars going to many parts of the globe and finding many contented customers. Although heavy, the saloon was lively and comfortable, besides retaining that AC quality and individuality which counted so much.

For 1952 a switch was made to all-hydraulic brake operation and in that same year the Buckland Body Works of Buntingford, Hertfordshire, announced a shapely, open 5-seater tourer version of the model, called the Buckland Sports. This sold well alongside the saloon, both being built until 1957 when they were superseded.

The AC All-Weather Invalid Chair

Two world wars had given the AC Company ample experience in diversification and in the 1950s the company reverted to three-wheeler manufacture, developing the AC all-weather invalid chair to a Ministry of Pensions contract. For a period AC also built a three-wheeled 250cc Villiers-engined mini-car called the Petite.

Remarkably, another venture was to manufacture four special electric trains for the Southend Corporation, to transport holiday passengers on the Southend pier. Yet another AC product was the ‘Bag Boy’ golf trolley, made under licence from the USA, but in 1953 came a sensational change in AC policy which gladdened the hearts of all sports car enthusiasts – the introduction of an all-new Ace.

The Ace, Barchetta Style

This model, one of the highlights of the 1953 Earls Court Motor Show, was based on the very successful Tojeiro sports-racing car built by John Tojeiro of Cambridge for the racing driver Cliff Davis. The competition Tojeiro was powered by a 2-Iitre Bristol engine, and its body closely followed the Ferrari open two-seaterBarchetta style as used on the original 166 ‘Inter’ model. AC’s interpretation had much the same elegant shape, but its engine was John Weller’s time-honoured 2-litre aluminium six, in triple SU- carburettored 85 bhp form, driving through a Moss 4-speedsynchromesh gearbox.

For an AC, the chassis was daringly new, being of welded ‘ladder’ type in 3 in. diameter 16-gauge steel tube, with all-round independent suspension by transverse leaf springs and fabricated tubular wishbones, controlled by Armstrong telescopic hydraulic dampers.

Beautifully clean in shape and with a dry weight of only 15 cwt, this new AC could top the 100 mph mark and was an immediate success.It was followed 12 months later by the even more handsome Aceca coupe, and subsequently AC at last broke away from their own classic six-cylinder engine, and offered the 125 bhp 2-Iitre Bristol six-cylinder unit, giving 118mph, as an alternative.

In 1961 yet another power variant, the 2.6-litre Ford Zephyr six with Ruddspeed modifications and five stages of tune, became optional. Not that the old AC six was pensioned right off; it remained available right up to 1963, still with its original 65 mm x 100 mm bore and stroke and basic 1919 characteristics.

Indeed, the changes wrought upon it during its 44-year career amounted to little more than multiplication of the carburettors from one to three, raised compression ratio and improved breathing, modified water circulation, use of Vandervell-type bearings, and addition of a fifth main bearing and a crankshaft damper.

The Ace-Bristol Two-Seater

Meantime, the Ace-Bristol open two-seater had been successful in racing, making hay in the 2-litre production sports class in the United States, and doing well in British races, where one example won the Three Hours final of the 1956 Autosport Championship, and another won this championship outright in 1957. The cars also ventured to Le Mans for the famous 24-Hours race, being placed 10th in 1957, 8th and 9th in 1958 and 7th in 1959, all of which demonstrated their commendable stamina in the face of much fiercer prototype sports machines.

These performances undoubtedly played a vital part in the next major AC development, but meanwhile 1959 brought another new production model, the Greyhound (reviving a pre-war name). This was a less attractive car than the Ace or Aceca, but more roomy with a four-seater coupe body on a longer wheelbase. A Bristol 2-litre or 2.2-litre engine was used, together with disc front brakes, and a significant change came in the suspension, which utilised coil springs and double wishbones in place of the former transverse leaves.

The AC Greyhound

The Greyhound was expensive at over £2,800, but 150 were built between 1960 and 1963, when a tempestuous newcomer swept it and all other existing AC models off the production line. The Ace-Bristol’s racing feats in the USA drew the eye of a shrewd Texan racing driver, Carroll Shelby, co-winner of Le Mans 1959 in an Aston Martin. To Shelby it was obvious that the sturdy Ace chassis could take a lot more power than it was currently using.

The Bristol engine, moreover, was expensive to maintain and the fastest examples tended to be fragile. Shelby envisaged putting an American Ford ohv V8 engine, comparatively little stressed, into the Ace, and in 1962 he visited the Thames Ditton factory to finalise his project.

AC lost no time. A 4.2-litre unit giving about 240 bhp was installed in a chassis, the suspension, transmission and wheels were ‘beefed up’, disc brakes were fitted and very quickly the first AC Cobra prototype was built and sent out to the States. The reaction was sensational and Shelby clamoured for all the Cobras the factory could possibly make. The chassis and bodies were built in Britain, then shippedout to California to have their engines and gearboxes fitted.

subsequently the 270 bhp 4.7-litre engine was fitted. So great was the demand for the Cobra that by early 1963 AC were obliged to drop production of all other models. The design was improved as the production rates grew, the wheels and tyresgrew larger, rack and pinion steering was adopted and the transverse leaf springing replaced by coil springs and wishbones.

In appearance the Cobra was extremely impressive, the grace of the original Ace bodywork being enhanced by the massive wheels, extended wheel arches, swelling bonnet and big twin exhausts, to impart a very rugged but superbly balanced shape.

The car travelled as fast as it looked, and inevitably it was raced. Shelby formed a team for the GT class of the 1964 World Sports Car Championship series and his Cobras were placed 1-2-3 in class (4-5-6 overall) in the Sebring r z-Hours race, and first in class, 4th overall, at Le Mans.

In 1965 they scored class victories at Daytona, Nurburgring and Le Mans, winning the GT Championship outright. Shelby’s next step was to persuade a Ford 6997 cc, 425 bhp engine into the car, the variant being called the Cobra 427 after the cylinder displacement in cubic inches. This made a 160mph road car at appreciably less cost than contemporaryFerraris, Maseratis etc, and Cobra demand continued.

From AC’s point of view, however, the Cobra operation had become remote from Thames Ditton, which simply became a source of chassis. AC therefore evolved their own 427 model, fitting the 7-litreFord engine in a lengthened Cobra chassis, and getting the Italian coachbuilder Pietro Frua to design and build an elegant two-seater convertible body. Refinement rather than fierce performance divorced the AC 427 from the Cobra image; automatic transmission was employed, and in 1967 a slightly larger, more modern Ford V8 unit of 7016 cc (428 cu. in.) giving 345 bhp was fitted, the model then becoming the 428.

The AC 3000ME

The 1970s were not a good period for luxury car manufacturers and Derek Hurlock went searching for a totally new smaller car. Mid-engined designs were in fashion at the time and in 1972 the Diablo, prototype with an Austin Maxi engine and transaxle was built by privateers Peter Bohanna and Robin Stables. In much the same way as they had taken up the Tojeiro prototype and turned it into the Ace, AC acquired the rights and at the 1973 London Motor Show showed their own version, the mid-engined ME3000 with the 3.0-litre Ford Essex V6 engine installed transversely over a bespoke AC-designed gearbox.

Development was virtually complete in 1976 when new Type Approval regulations were introduced. A prototype failed the 30 mph (48 km/h) crash test, and the chassis had to be redesigned. On the second attempt, the car passed with flying colours. This was a huge achievement for a tiny firm – Vauxhall had to make several attempts before the contemporary Chevette passed. For AC, such delays meant that the first production cars (now renamed 3000ME) were not delivered until 1979, by which time they were in direct competition with the Lotus Esprit. Although comfortable, brisk, nicely built and practical, AC’s ambitions of selling 250 cars per year were a distant memory.

After just 71 cars were sold, Hurlock called a halt to production as his health was suffering and the company was struggling in the teeth of a recession. In 1984 production stopped at Thames Ditton and the car and the AC name were licenced to a new company registered as AC (Scotland) plc run by David McDonald in a new factory in Hillington, Glasgow. Here, 30 cars were built, including a development car tested with Alfa Romeo’s 2.5-litre V6 engine and a nearly-complete Mark 2 prototype of the same.

Regardless (or possibly because) of these developments, AC Scotland called in the receivers in 1985. After selling the historic High Street works for redevelopment, AC themselves soldiered on as a service operation in the ’21st Century’ works on Summer Road until the Hurlock family finally sold their holdings in 1986 to William West. After some complex machinations the company was split between property interests and the car brand; the former was renamed and the latter was acquired by Brian Angliss.

Also see: AC Car Reviews | AC Ace | AC Cobra | AC ME3000

Abarth 2000 Sports Prototype
Stunningly beautiful and very brutal, the AC Cobra evolved into the graceful but still powerful 428, and the handy 345 bhp made it good for a top speed of just over 150 mph, with gut-busting acceleration…

Buses GUY Wolverhampton England UK

Buses GUY Wolverhampton England UK

GUY       Guy Motors logo

Guy Motors was a Wolverhampton-based vehicle manufacturer that produced cars, lorries, buses and trolleybuses. The company was founded by Sydney S. Guy (1885-1971) who was born in Kings Heath, Birmingham. Guy Motors operated out of its Fallings Park factory from 1914 to 1982, playing an important role in the development of the British motor industry.

Aerial_View,_Guy_Motors_Ltd.,_Fallings_Park,_Wolverhamptonan-aerial-view-of-guy-motors-fallings-park-factory

1953 Guy GS bus built for London Transport1953 Guy GS bus built for London Transport

History

Foundation and the First World War

Sydney S. Guy registered Guy Motors Limited on Saturday 30 May 1914, the same day he departed his position as Works Manager at the Wolverhampton company, Sunbeam. A factory was built on the site at Fallings Park, Wolverhampton. and by September 1914 production was underway on the newly designed 30cwt lorry. This employed a much lighter form of pressed steel frame, unlike the more commonly used heavy rolled steel channel frames of the time. This made the vehicle able to cross difficult terrain and a 14 seat poster bus built based on the design was used for crossing the Scottish Highlands.

Guy's 14 seater bus designed for use in the highlands

1914 Guy’s 14 seater bus designed for use in the highlands

In 1915 Guy came under control of the Ministry of Munitions and production was focused on the war effort. The factory continued to produce 30cwt lorries which were supplied to Britain’s allies in the First World War. They also produced Wasp and Dragonfly radial aircraft engines, Tylor truck engines and Maudslay gearboxes as well as being the country’s largest maker of depth charge fuzes. For their efforts during the war Guy received a commendation from William Weir, Secretary of State for Air. Due to orders from the ministry Guy prospered during the war, expanding its factory and became an established name in British manufacturing.

1920s

The post-war period was difficult for the motor industry as military contracts were cancelled and military vehicles no longer required for service were sold onto the market at low prices. Guy returned to the civilian market, deciding to make luxury cars with a design by RH Rose, also from Sunbeam. They produced the Guy 8-cylinder car, powered by the first British V8 engine and featuring horizontal side valves. Around 25 of these were made and it was joined by a smaller model in 1922 with the 2465 cc four-cylinder 16.9 hp. A cheaper model followed in 1924 with the 1954 cc 13/36 with an engine from Coventry Climax. About 110 of the 4-cylinder models are thought to have been made. Production also continued on vehicles based on the 30cwt chassis such as the Guy charabanc and their major success the 30 seater bus.

In 1924 the company adopted the slogan ‘Feathers in our Cap’ which led to the addition of a Native American mascot to their vehicles. 1924 also saw Guy produce the first ever dropped frame chassis for passenger vehicles (the B-type). This design allowed passengers to enter buses in a single step and became extremely popular, Guy receiving an order for 170 from Rio de Janeiro.

Guy Motors badgeGuy Motors badge

Growing populations in towns and cities meant larger capacity buses were a necessity, leading Guy to develop a 6-wheeled version of their dropped-frame chassis which allowed for the introduction of the first 6-wheeled double decker buses and 6 wheeled trolleybuses in 1926. Guy double decker buses and trolleybuses would prove popular with a fleet of double deckers sold to the London Public Omnibus Company and exports supplied all around the world. Exports served as a major source of income for Guy with sales to South Africa, Pakistan, India and the Netherlands, their armoured vehicles proving particularly popular for covering difficult terrain with 100 supplied to the Indian government in 1928.

1923 Guy's first military vehicleGuy’s first military vehicle produced in 1923

In 1928 Guy took control of fellow Wolverhampton manufacturer the Star Motor Company, who had seen declining sales throughout the decade, in an attempt to expand their luxury car manufacturing. Under Guy, Star Motors moved to a new factory in Bushbury and the range of vehicles was narrowed to prevent competition against itself. Despite this Star continued to struggle and a loss was made on every car sold. The Wall Street Crash had a crippling effect on industry and the subsequent recession meant Guy could no longer afford to fit out Star’s Bushbury plant and in 1932 the company entered receivership.

Despite performing well throughout the decade, by the end of the 1920s Guy was facing an uncertain future due to the takeover of Star and the Wall Street Crash which had seen share prices fall from one pound to one shilling.

1930s

Guy was able to endure the depression due to orders from the war office and by taking advantage of the 1930 Road Traffic Act which encouraged the development of lighter vehicles. In 1933 the Arab bus chassis, designed for use with diesel engines, was launched and would prove a mainstay of Guy’s success for the next twenty years.

From the mid-1930s, the company became increasingly involved in the British rearmament programme, developing and producing military vehicles. In 1935 Guy submitted their new four wheel Ant armoured car to military trials where it impressed and 150 were ordered by the government. After this success Guy began to concentrate solely on the production of military vehicles and by 1938 Guy relied exclusively on Government contracts and had ended civilian productions. During this time Guy designed a new armoured car, the Quad Ant, which was welded rather than riveted together. This development made armoured vehicles much safer and is reported to have saved the British government £100 million, earning Guy a commendation from the Royal Commission.

1914 Guy Syzygies

1914 Guy Syzygies

1914 Guy Syzygies 2

1914 Guy Syzygies

1914 Guy Syzygies 3

1914 Guy Syzygies

1914 Guy Syzygies 4

1914 Guy Syzygies

1914 Guy's 14 seater bus designed for use in the highlands

1919 Guy Charabanc

1919 Guy Charabanc T-5182

1921 Guy 30-seater bus

1921 Guy 30-seater bus

1921 Guy coaches in Wolverhampton Market place

1921 Guy coaches in Wolverhampton Market place

1922 Guy Promenade Runabout

1922 Guy Promenade Runabout

1924 Guy six-wheelers in Rio de Janeiro

1924 Guy six-wheelers in Rio de Janeiro

1925 Guy first six wheeled pneumatic Trolley Bus

1925 Guy first six wheeled pneumatic Trolley Bus

1925 Guy Motors

1925 Guy Motors

1925 Guy Rio 1925

1925 Guy Rio 1925

1927 Guy 6 wheeled Londonbus

1927 Guy 6 wheeled Londonbus

1927 Guy 26 seater

1927 Guy 26 seater

1927 Guy FBB (chassis number 22257) with a Hall Lewis B32R body

1927 Guy FBB (chassis number 22257) with a Hall Lewis B32R body

1927 Guy Star Flyer

1927 Guy Star Flyer

1928 Guy 6 wheeled double deck long distance sleeper coach

1928 Guy 6 wheeled double deck long distance sleeper coach

1928 Guy BT Dodson DY 4965 in Hastings

1928 Guy BT Dodson DY 4965 in Hastings

1929 Guy phptbyWrK

1929 Guy php

1930 Guy FC of Newcastle Corporation

1930 Guy FC of Newcastle Corporation

1930 Guy Motors

1930 Guy Motors

1930 guy-vixen-05

1930 guy-vixen

1931 Guy 'BTX' Zuid Africa

1931 Guy ‘BTX’ Zuid Africa

1931 Guy Trolleybus op weg naar Japan

1931 Guy Trolleybus op weg naar Japan

1932 Guy Open coach

1932 Guy Open coach

1933 Guy Trolleybus adv1

1933 Guy Trolleybus adv1

1933 Guy

1933 Guy NL

1934 Guy Wolf Guy GR-1157

1934 Guy Wolf Guy GR-1157

1936 Guy Trolleybus  adv

1936 Guy Trolleybus  adv

1937 Guy Arab

1937 Guy Arab

1937 Guy Wolf with Martin body

1937 Guy Wolf with Martin body

1938 Guy Wolf with 20 seat bodywork by Waveney

1938 Guy Wolf with 20 seat bodywork by Waveney

1943 Guy Arab I JUA762 Pickering H30 26R Re bodied ROE H31-25R (2)

1943 Guy Arab I JUA762 Pickering H30 26R Re bodied ROE H31-25R

1943 Guy Arab I JUA762 Pickering H30 26R Re bodied ROE H31-25R

1943 Guy Arab I JUA762 Pickering H30 26R Re bodied ROE H31-25R

1943 Guy Arab II new in 1943 as a double decker, later an open top decker similar to 39

1943 Guy Arab II as a double decker, later an open top decker similar to 39

1946 Guy Arab III with Massey C35F body new to W. Alexander

1946 Guy Arab III with Massey C35F body new to W. Alexander

1946 Guy Arab Massey TSB019

1946 Guy Arab Massey TSB019

1946 Guy Arab Seamer Service

1946 Guy Arab Seamer Service

1946 Guy Arab with Brush B35F body

1946 Guy Arab with Brush B35F body

1946 Guy Vixen Hainje B-22878

1946 Guy Vixen Hainje B-22878 NL

1946 Guy-Arab bus 84 met carrosserie van Verheul. Dienstbus Almelo-Glanerbrug op de weg Borne-Hengelo. Opname verm. 1949.

1946 Guy-Arab bus 84 met carrosserie van Verheul. Dienstbus

1947 Guy Arab (Seida)

1947 Guy Arab (Seida)

1947 Guy Arab III with Duple C35F body

1947 Guy Arab III with Duple C35F body

1947 Guy Arab Verheul NB-34-13

1947 Guy Arab Verheul NB-34-13 NL

1947 Guy first post war Trolley Bus Belfast Corporation

1947 Guy first post war Trolley Bus Belfast Corporation

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders GTW 30

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr. Saunders GTW 30 NL

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 32

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 32 NL

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 33

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 33 NL

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 34

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 34 NL

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 35

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 35 NL

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 36

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 36 NL

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 37

1947 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Saunders-de Schelde GTW 37 NL

1947 Guy Motors of Wolverhampton, Individually built bus advert

1947 Guy Motors of Wolverhampton, Individually built bus advert

1947 Guy Motors of Wolverhampton, Newport buses bus advert

1947 Guy Motors of Wolverhampton, Newport buses bus advert

1947 Guy Motors of Wolverhampton, Southampton Guy Arab bus advert

1947 Guy Motors of Wolverhampton, Southampton Guy Arab bus advert

1947 Guy Saunders Tet 075

1947 Guy Saunders Tet 075 NL

1947 guy-arab-01

1947 guy-arab

1947 Guy-Vixen. Carrosserie Bos(linker bus)

1947 Guy-Vixen. Carrosserie v d Bos(linker bus) NL

1947-52 Guy carr. Den Oudsten NB-21-69

1947-52 Guy carr. Den Oudsten NB-21-69 NL

1947-52 Guy Mk III  NB-01-40

1947-52 Guy Vixen carr. Verheul NB-28-40 NL

1948 Guy Arab 16 Brian Shaw

1948 Guy Arab 16 Brian Shaw

1948 Guy Arab 16

1948 Guy Arab 16

1948 Guy Arab 21 Brian Shaw

1948 Guy Arab 21 Brian Shaw

1948 Guy Arab 37

1948 Guy Arab 37

1948 Guy Arab carr. Verheul NB-28-54

1948 Guy Arab carr. Verheul NB-28-54

1948 Guy Arab Fleet LUT&PC 22

1948 Guy Arab Fleet LUT&PC 22

1948 Guy Arab Fleet of Maidstone Corporation Transport Department 26

1948 Guy Arab Fleet of Maidstone Corporation Transport Department 26

1948 Guy Arab Fleet of Newport Corporation Transport 24

1948 Guy Arab Fleet of Newport Corporation Transport 24

1948 Guy Arab Glasgow Corporation Transport Fleet 23

1948 Guy Arab Glasgow Corporation Transport Fleet 23

1948 Guy Arab I 136

1948 Guy Arab I 136

1948 Guy Arab III with an MCW 35 seat body

1948 Guy Arab III with an MCW 35 seat body

1948 Guy Arab III with MCW 35 seat rear entrance body.

1948 Guy Arab III with MCW 35 seat rear entrance body.

1948 Guy Arab IV African Transport Limited Kenya 30

1948 Guy Arab IV African Transport Limited Kenya 30

1948 Guy Arab Mark IV Hong Kong China Bus Company Limeted 34

1948 Guy Arab Mark IV Hong Kong China Bus Company Limeted 34

1948 Guy Arab Mark IV South Africa 35

1948 Guy Arab Mark IV South Africa 35 Greyhound

1948 Guy Arab Mark IV Southdown Motor services Limeted 32

1948 Guy Arab Mark IV Southdown Motor services Limited 32

1948 Guy Arab Mk III 19 6 1957 Verheul 1948 TET 88 E-45960

1948 Guy Arab Mk III 19 6 1957 Verheul 1948 TET 88 E-45960 NL

1948 Guy Arab MkIII, Gardner 6LW, carr. Verheul GTW 320

1948 Guy Arab MkIII, Gardner 6LW, carr. Verheul GTW 320 NL

1948 Guy Arab MkIII, Gardner 6LW, carr. Verheul GTW 324

1948 Guy Arab MkIII, Gardner 6LW, carr. Verheul GTW 321 NL

1948 Guy Arab MkIII, Gardner 6LW, carr. Verheul GTW 328

1948 Guy Arab MkIII, Gardner 6LW, carr. Verheul GTW 324 NL

1948 Guy Arab MkIII, Gardner 6LW, carr. Verheul GTW

1948 Guy Arab MkIII, Gardner 6LW, carr. Verheul GTW 328 NL

1948 Guy Arab MkIII, Gardner 6LW, carr. Verheul GTW 321

1948 Guy Arab MkIII, Gardner 6LW, carr. Verheul GTW NL

1948 Guy Arab Single decker 2

1948 Guy Arab Single decker 2

1948 Guy Arab single decker vehicle5

1948 Guy Arab single decker vehicle

1948 Guy Arab Single Decker

1948 Guy Arab Single Decker

1948 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Verheul GTW 39

1948 Guy Gardner 6LW Arab MkIII carr Verheul GTW 39 NL

1948 Guy met Verheul carr. uit de serie 82 tm 84 uit 1948  werd in 1953 verbouwd . De achterkant is verheul en front is _

1948 Guy met Verheul carr. uit de serie 82 tm 84 uit 1948  werd in 1953 verbouwd . De achterkant is verheul NL

1948 Guy Otters were never common and ones with Alexander bodywork rarer still

1948 Guy Otters were never common and ones with Alexander bodywork rarer still

1948 Guy Vixen  coach

1948 Guy Vixen  coach

1948 Guy Wolf chassis carries a Barnard body

1948 Guy Wolf chassis carries a Barnard body

1948 Guy-Arab met carrosserie Saunders (Engeland)

1948 Guy-Arab met carrosserie Saunders  NL

1948 guy-arab-03

1948 guy-arab dd

1948 guy-arab-04

1948 guy-arab 440

1948 guy-arab-06

1948 guy-arab 440

1948 guy-arab-08

1948 guy-arab dd

1948 Guy-bus 23 erachter Crossley- Scheldebus 20 (NS 1065) op 12 september 1948 vliegveld Beek en EBAD

1948 Guy-bus 23 erachter Crossley- Scheldebus 20 (NS 1065) op 12 september 1948 vliegveld Beek en EBAD NL

1948 The Arab Mark IV, Guy's most successful bus design

1948 The Arab Mark IV, Guy’s most successful bus design

1948 The Sunbeam Double-Decker Trolleybus

1948 The Sunbeam Double-Decker Trolleybus

1949 burlingham guy coach rmJWX126

1949 burlingham guy coach

1949 Guy Arab III 6LW with Park Royal H30-26R body

1949 Guy Arab III 6LW with Park Royal H30-26R body

1949 Guy Arab III, fleet number 10 (KTC 615)

1949 Guy Arab III, fleet number 10 (KTC 615)

1950 Guy Arab III-Harkness Coachworks B31F (may be B30F now) 286, MZ7384

1949 Guy Arab IV

1950 Guy Arab Mark IV

1949 Guy Arab IV

1950 Guy Arab Mk III

1950-guy-arab-mk-iii

1949 Guy Arab MK 5

1949 Guy Arab MK 5

1949 Guy Arab MKIII Gardner 6 LW carr Hainje GTW 329

1949 Guy Arab MKIII Gardner 6 LW carr Hainje GTW 329 NL

1949 Guy Arab IV

1949 Guy Arab MK 5

1949 Guy ArabIII-Brislington BusWorks

1949 Guy ArabIII-Brislington Bus Works

1949 Guy Motors

1949 Guy Motors adv.

1949 Guy Vixen carrosserie Den Oudsten

1949 Guy Vixen carrosserie Den Oudsten NL

1949 guy-arab-07

1949 guy-arab

1949-53 Guy-Jongman NB-56-18

1949-53 Guy-carr. Jongman NB-56-18 NL

1950 Guy Arab III with Guy B33R bodywork

1950 Guy Arab III with Guy B33R bodywork

1950 Guy Arab III-Harkness Coachworks B31F (may be B30F now) 286, MZ7384

1950 Guy Arab III-Harkness Coachworks B31F (may be B30F now) 286, MZ7384

1950 Guy Arab III-Harkness

1950 Guy Arab III-Harkness

1950 Guy Arab Mark IV

1950 Guy Arab Mark IV

1950 Guy Arab MK IV South Africa 37

1950 Guy Arab MK IV South Africa 37

1950 Guy Arab UF with Guy B40F body (using Park Royal framework)

1950 Guy Arab UF with Guy B40F body (using Park Royal framework)

1950 Guy Arab V double deck bus

1950 Guy Arab V double deck bus

1950 Guy Motors

1950 Guy Motors

1950 Guy Vixen Overland Firms 59

1950 Guy Vixen Overland Firms 59

1950 Guy Vixen

1950 Guy Vixen NL

1950 guy-arab-02

1950 guy-arab

1950 guy-arab-05

1950 guy-arab

1950 Guy-Vixen

1950 Guy-Vixen NL

1951 Guy Arab III with a Windover C33F body

1951 Guy Arab III with a Windover C33F body

1951 Guy Arab III with rare Roe coach body

1951 Guy Arab III with rare Roe coach body

1951 Guy Arab III with unusual Roe coach body

1951 Guy Arab III with unusual Roe coach body

1951 Guy Arab UF fitted from new with a preselector gearbox and carried a Guy B40F body.

1951 Guy Arab UF fitted from new with a preselector gearbox and carried a Guy B40F body.

1951 Guy-Arab 76 met carrosserie van Hondebrink. Opname 1955 tijdens toerwagenral

1951 Guy-Arab 76 met carrosserie van Hondebrink. Opname 1955 tijdens toerwagenral NL

1951 Guy-Vixen. Carrosserie. Hainje

1951-guy-vixen-carrosserie-hainje

1952 Guy Arab III with Roe B41C bodywork

1952 Guy Arab III with Roe B41C bodywork

1952 Guy Arab LUF with Weymann B44F body

1952 Guy Arab LUF with Weymann B44F body

1952 Guy Arab Underfloor engined single deck Huddersfield 43 seater bus 4

1952 Guy Arab Underfloor engined single deck Huddersfield 43 seater bus 4

1952 Guy GS - MXX 342

1952 Guy GS – MXX 342

1952 Guy Otters with rare Mulliner bodywork

1952 Guy Otters with rare Mulliner bodywork

1952 Guy Underfloor Verheul  Jac. van Dijk nr 58 NB-06-72

1952 Guy Underfloor Verheul  Jac. van Dijk nr 58 NB-06-72 NL

1952 Guy Vixen GS13 at Amersham E

1952 Guy Vixen Wadham

1952 Guy Vixen Wadham

1952 Guy-Arab 89 met carrosserie van Verheul. Met 45 zit en 10 staanplaatsen. Opname grens Glanerbrug in 1954 NL

1952 Guy-Arab 89 met carrosserie van Verheul. Met 45 zit en 10 staanplaatsen. Opname grens Glanerbrug in 1954

1952 Guy-Arab nr. 86 met carrosserie van Verheul NL

1952 Guy-Arab nr. 86 met carrosserie van Verheul

1952 guy-otter

1952 guy-otter-04

1952 guy-otter

1952 guy-otter-07

1953 Guy Otter

1953 Guy Arab 88 met carrosserie van Verheul.

1953-guy-arab-88-met-carrosserie-van-verheul

1953 Guy Arab bus 60

1953 Guy Arab bus 60

1953 Guy Arab III with Roe B41C bodywork

1953-guy-arab-iii-with-roe-b41c-bodywork

1953 Guy GS MXX-343ECW B26F Kerel

1953 Guy GS MXX-343ECW B26F Kerel

1953 GUY Otter Diesel light vehicle12

1953 GUY Otter Diesel light vehicle12

1953 Guy Special NLLVP with ECW B26F body

1953 Guy Special NLLVP with ECW B26F body

1953 Guy Special NLLVP with ECW B26F bodywork

1953 Guy Special with ECW B26F bodywork

1953 Guy Special with ECW B26F bodywork

1953 Guy Special NLLVP with ECW B26F bodywork

1953 Guy Vixen 30 seater vehicle 4

1953 Guy Vixen 30 seater vehicle 4

1953 Guy Vixen London Transport GS84 and GS76

1953 Guy Vixen London Transport GS84 and GS76

1953 Guys with ECW B26F bodies for use on low traffic country area routes

1953 Guys with ECW B26F bodies for use on low traffic country area routes

1953 Guys with ECW B26F bodies

1953 Guys with ECW B26F bodies

1954 Guy Arab Lighteight heavy duty underfloor engined coach

1954 Guy Arab Lighteight heavy duty underfloor engined coach

1954 Guy Arab LUF with a Guy B43F body

1954 Guy Arab LUF with a Guy B43F body

1954 Guy Arab LUF with Picktree C35F body

1954 Guy Arab LUF with Picktree C35F body

1954 Guy Arab LUF with rare Picktree Continental C35F body

1954 Guy Arab LUF with rare Picktree Continental C35F body

1954 Guy Motors of Wolverhampton advert 2

1954 Guy Motors of Wolverhampton advert

1954 Guy Motors of Wolverhampton advert 3

1954 Guy Motors of Wolverhampton advert

1954 Guy Otter with a Roe B25F body

1954 Guy Otter with a Roe B25F body

1954 Guy Sunbeam Trolley Double Deck Bus Walsall Corporation

1954 Guy Sunbeam Trolley Double Deck Bus Walsall Corporation

1954 Guy Warrior 43 seater Trambus with AEC 6cyl 135 bhp engine

1954 Guy Warrior 43 seater Trambus with AEC 6cyl 135 bhp engine

1954 Guy-bus 8 van de EBAD met Den Oudsten carrosserie

1954 Guy-bus 8 van de EBAD met Den Oudsten carrosserie NL

1955 Guy Arab LUF with Alexander C41F bodywork

1955 Guy Arab LUF with Alexander C41F bodywork

1955 Guy Arab LUF

1955 Guy Arab LUF

1955 Guy Arab LUFs, fitted with Roe B34C+24 bodies

1955 Guy Arab LUFs, fitted with Roe B34C+24 bodies

1955 Guy Arab Mark IV East kent Road car Company Limited 31

1955 Guy Arab Mark IV East kent Road car Company Limited 31

1955 Guy Warrior LUF Coach 3

1955 Guy Warrior LUF Coach 3

1955 Guy Warrior with Burlingham C41F body

1955 Guy Warrior with Burlingham C41F body

1955 guy-s ad

1955 guy-s ad

1956 Guy Arab LUFs with Willowbrook C37C bodies

1956 Guy Arab LUFs with Willowbrook C37C bodies

1956 Guy Arab Mark IV Belgium 36

1956 Guy Arab Mark IV Belgium 36

1956 Guy Arab, with Park Royal body

1956 Guy Arab, with Park Royal body

1956 Guy Kusters-bus, de EBAD 91

1956 Guy Kusters-bus, de EBAD 91

1956 Guy Raghano België

1956 Guy Raghano België

1956 Guy Seal Small capacity tourist coach 1

1956 Guy Seal Small capacity tourist coach 1

1956 Guy Warrior, XUK768, with Mulliner C37C body

1956 Guy Warrior, XUK768, with Mulliner C37C body

1957 Guy Arab LUF with Roe B41R body

1957 Guy Arab LUF with Roe B41R body

1957 GUY België

1957 GUY Jonckheere België

1957 Guy Arab Toerwagen 88  met carrosserie van Verheul

1957 Guy Arab Toerwagen 88 met carrosserie van Verheul

1957 Guy Otter P6 with Mulliner B26F bodywork

1957 Guy Otter P6 with Mulliner B26F bodywork

1957 Guy Vixen car.

1957 Guy Vixen

1958 Guy Arab LUFs with Longwell Green B44F bodies, XNY419

1958 Guy Arab LUFs with Longwell Green B44F bodies, XNY419

1958 Guy LUF with Longwell Green B44F body

1958 Guy LUF with Longwell Green B44F body

1958 Guy UF with Burlingham Seagull C41F body

1958 Guy UF with Burlingham Seagull C41F body

1958 Guy Victory Trambus 2

1958 Guy Victory Trambus

1958 Guy Victory Trambus 5

1958 Guy Victory Trambus

1958 Guy Victory UF 44 till 65 seater Luxery Touring Coach Victory 2

1958 Guy Victory UF 44 till 65 seater Luxery Touring Coach Victory 2

1958 Guy Victory

1958 Guy Victory

1958 Guy Warrior Gardner 5HLW oil engine 2

1958 Guy Warrior Gardner 5HLW oil engine 2

1958 Guy Wulfrunian

1958 Guy Wulfrunian

1958 Guy-Arab nr. 89 met carrosserie van Verheul. De bus had 45 zit en 10 staanplaatsen

1958 Guy-Arab nr. 89 met carrosserie van Verheul. De bus had 45 zit en 10 staanplaatsen

1958 guy-victory-02

1958 guy-victory

1958 guy-victory-03

1958 guy-victory

1958 guy-victory-05

1958 guy-victory

1959 GUY 1460

1959 GUY 1460

1959 Guy Arab LUF Powered by a Gardner 6HLW engine Registration 1294 RE

1959 Guy Arab LUF Powered by a Gardner 6HLW engine Registration 1294 RE

1960 GUY J- Type

1960 GUY J- Type

1960 Guy Warrior coach vehicle21

1960 Guy Warrior coach vehicle 21

1960 guy-victory-01

1960 guy-victory

1961 Guy Arab III-Strachen-HighlandTrans.G.Rixon2

1961 Guy Arab III-Strachen-Highland Trans.G.Rixon2

1961 Guy Wulfrunians with Roe H43-32F body

1961 Guy Wulfrunians with Roe H43-32F body

1963 Guy Arab IV with Massey lowbridge body

1963 Guy Arab IV with Massey lowbridge body

1964 Guy Conquest Luxery Coach

1964 Guy Conquest Luxery Coach

1965 Guy Conquest Luxery Coach with AEC AV505 Gardner 6LX or 6LW Victory Trambus

1965 Guy Conquest Luxery Coach with AEC AV505 Gardner 6LX or 6LW Victory Trambus

Guy Victory 40-45 seat

1960 Guy Victory 40-45 seat

Guy 434 at castle coch resiz

GUY DD

Guy Arab - FRU 224

Guy Arab – FRU 224

Guy buses

Guy buses

1967 Guy -ZABO Bus

1967 Guy -ZABO NL © AvdBorg&CBos

1978 Guy Victory U F Victory 1

1978 Guy Victory U F Victory 1 ?

The End

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