AUBURN Automobile

Auburn Automobile, touring and sports cars, Indiana, United States 1900-1936

Auburn Automobile Company
Automobile Manufacturing
Industry Automotive
Genre Touring Cars & Sports Cars
Fate Bankruptcy
Founded Auburn, Indiana
Founder Frank and Morris Eckhart
Headquarters Auburn, Indiana, United States
Area served
United States
Key people
Frank and Morris Eckhart, & E.L. Cord
Products Vehicles
Automotive parts
Services Automobiles

Auburn was a brand name of American automobiles produced from 1900 through 1936.

Corporate history

The Auburn Automobile Company grew out of the Eckhart Carriage Company, founded in Auburn, Indiana in 1874 by Charles Eckhart (1841–1915). Eckhart’s sons, Frank and Morris, experimented making automobiles before entering the business in earnest, absorbing two other local carmakers and moving into a larger plant in 1909. The enterprise was modestly successful until materials shortages during World War I forced the plant to close.

In 1919, the Eckhart brothers sold the company to a group of Chicago investors headed by Ralph Austin Bard, who later served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy for President Franklin Delano Roosevelt and as Undersecretary of the Navy for President Roosevelt and for President Harry S. Truman. The new owners revived the business but failed to realize their anticipated profits and in 1924, approached Errett Lobban Cord(1894–1974), a highly successful automobile salesman, with an offer to run the company. Cord countered with an offer to take over completely in what amounted to a leveraged buyout and the Chicago group accepted. Cord aggressively marketed the company’s unsold inventory and completed his buyout before the end of 1925.

But styling and engineering failed to overcome the fact that Cord’s vehicles were too expensive for the Depression-era market and Cord’s stock manipulations that would force him to give up control of his car companies. Under injunction from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission to refrain from further violations, Cord sold his shares in his automobile holding company. In 1937, production of Auburns, along with that of Cords and Duesenbergs, ended.

1936 Auburn 654 Cabriolet.

 1936 Auburn 654 Cabriolet.

1935 Auburn 851 Speedster a

 1935 Auburn 851 Speedster

Models

The 1904 Auburn was a touring car model. Equipped with a tonneau, it could seat two or four passengers and sold for US$1000. The flat-mounted single-cylinder engine, situated at the center of the car, produced 10 hp (7.5 kW). A two-speed planetary transmission was fitted. The angle-steel-framed car weighed 1,500 lb (680 kg) and used half-elliptic springs.

In 1926, Cord, now the owner of Auburn, partnered with Duesenberg Corporation, famous for its racing cars, and used it as the launching platform for a line of high-priced luxury vehicles. He also put his own name on a front-wheel-drive car, the Cord, later referred to as “L-29”.

Employing imaginative designers such as Alan Leamy — chief designer of the 1933 Auburn Speedster, and Gordon Buehrig, who modified leftover bodies to produce the 1935 851 Speedster and modified the four-door, Cord built cars such as the Duesenberg Model J (1928–37), the Auburn Speedster (1935-7), and the Cord 810/812 (1936-7) that became famous for their advanced engineering as well as their striking appearance. TheAuburn Boattail Speedster was powered by a 4.6L straight eight that, with the popular supercharger option(150 hp), could top 100 mph (160 km/h) making it a popular model in the Hollywood market.

The Depression, coupled with Cord’s stock manipulations, spelled the end of the company and production ceased in 1937. The company’s art deco headquarters in Auburn now houses the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum and became a National Historic Landmark in 2005. The Auburn Automobile Company also had a manufacturing plant in Connersville, Indiana, formerly owned by the Lexington Motor Company.

Auburn production specifications

1928 Auburn Model 8-88 Sport SedanAuburn 8-Eighty-Eight Sedan

See also

1935 Auburn Speedster ad

 1935 Auburn Speedster ad

my picture collection found on the world wide web:

Advertisements

Author: Jeroen

In Dutch, my homelanguage: Ik ben Jeroen, tot januari 2015 was ik al dik 26 jaar werkzaam in een psychiatrisch ziekenhuis in een stad vlakbij Werelds grootste havenstad Rotterdam. Eerst als verpleegkundige/begeleider op high care, later op afdeling dubbeldiagnose (verslavingen) en ook nog een tijdje als administratief medewerker. Ik heb een spierziekte "Poli Myositis" (alle spieren zijn ontstoken) daardoor weinig energie. Sinds augustus 2015 is daarbij de diagnose Kanker gesteld, en ben ik helemaal arbeidsongeschikt geworden en zit middenin de behandelfase. Gelukkig ben ik daarnaast getrouwd, vader, en opa, en heb de nodige hobby's. Een daarvan is transportmiddelen verzamelen en daarmee een blog schrijven. Dit blog begon met bussen, maar nu komen ook sleepboten, auto's trucks en dergelijke aan bod. Kijk en geniet met me mee, reageer, en vul gerust aan. Fouten zal ik ook graag verbeteren. In English: I'm Jeroen, till januari 2015 I was already 26 years working as a nurse in a psychiatric hospital, near Rotterdam, Worlds biggest harbour with more than 98 nationalities living within it's borders. First I worked on closed high care ward and the last years on a ward with mainly addicted people. I liked my work very much. In 2007 I got ill. I got the diagnose Poli Myositis, a musscle dissease. Al my mussles are inflamed. And last august I got another diagnose. Cancer. It's plaveicelcel carcinoma and treated with Chemo and radioation. So I've even less energy than the last years. Still I try to make something of my life and the blog is helping with surviving with some pleasure.

10 thoughts on “AUBURN Automobile”

  1. There is a guy in Tulsa called Doug Pray whose father Glenn bought up all the parts from the Dusenburg factory back in the 1960’s and is the best person to go to for parts for these beautiful cars. The businness was called ACD Factory. If you have a need or want to know more about purchasing or selling an Auburn, Cord or Duesenberg, please call Doug Pray, President Auburn Cord Duesenberg Company, 918-251-3161, 918-810-5128 You can also watch this programme from The Pickers TV Show which is about a restored Auburn https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6BvhFUG9TI

    Liked by 2 people

  2. That is a great watch – The American Pickers show with the Auburn being driven back to the home of its previous owner over 600 miles after being made roadworthy for the first time in probably about 40 or more years, as the previous owner had only driven it as a youngster up and down his family’s drive to their mailbox..

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It’s a pity you don’t have a donate button! I’d certainly donate to this excellent blog! I guess for now i’ll settle for book-marking and adding your RSS feed to my Google account. I look forward to fresh updates and will share this website with my Facebook group. Chat soon!

    Like

  4. Today, I went to the beachfront with my kids. I found a sea shell and gave it to my 4 year old daughter and said “You can hear the ocean if you put this to your ear.” She placed the shell to her ear and screamed. There was a hermit crab inside and it pinched her ear. She never wants to go back! LoL I know this is totally off topic but I had to tell someone!

    Like

  5. Great post. I was checking continuously this weblog and I’m inspired! Extremely helpful info specifically the ultimate phase 🙂 I take care of such information much. I used to be looking for this certain information for a very long time. Thank you and good luck.

    Like

  6. I’m truly enjoying the design and layout of your website. It’s a very easy on the eyes which makes it much more pleasant for me to come here and visit more often. Did you hire out a developer to create your theme? Superb work!

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s