COMMER Trucks Luton England UK 1905

Commer QX

Commer

Commer
Fate Discontinued
Founded 1905
Headquarters Luton, England
Products Commercial vehicles
02 1907 Commer bus reg EC 634 1907

 Front of a 1909 Commer bus

Commer was a British manufacturer of commercial vehicles from 1905 until 1979. Commer vehicles included car-derived vans, light vans, medium to heavy commercial trucks, military vehicles and buses. The company designed and built its own diesel engines for its heavy commercial vehicles.

History

The company was formed as the Commercial Car Company, and was initially based in small premises in Lavender Hill, South London. In order to go into volume production a site was bought at Biscot Road, Biscot, Luton, where production of the first truck, the 3-ton RC type started in 1907. In 1909 the first bus was made. With the outbreak of the First World War the factory turned to the manufacture of military vehicles for the British Army, and by 1919 more than 3000 had been made.

In 1926, after being in receivership several times, Commer was taken over by Humber, which in 1931 became part of the Rootes Group.

The Commer name was replaced by the Dodge name during the 1970s following the takeover of Rootes by Chrysler Europe. After Peugeot purchased Chrysler Europe in 1978, the Commer factory was run in partnership with the truck division of Renault, Renault Trucks. It continued to produce the Dodge commercial truck range for some time, with Renault badges and a small amount of product development, eventually these were cancelled in favour of mainstream Renault models and switching production at the factory to production of Renault truck and bus engines in the early 1990s.

Many Commer vans and lorries are notable for being fitted with the Rootes TS3 engine, a two-stroke diesel three-cylinder horizontally opposed piston engine, which came to be known as the “Commer Knocker” owing to the distinct noise it produced. Newer Commer vehicles had Perkins and Cummins diesel engines, and less commonly Mercedes diesel engines.

Trucks

Main article: Karrier

Commer acquired the Karrier company as part of Rootes acquisition of Karrier in 1934. In the early 1960s production moved to Dunstable where Commer, Dodge (UK) and Karrier were all brought together.

The Karrier trademark is now owned by Peugeot.

Buses

https://myntransportblog.com/2013/11/25/buses-more-commer-1905-1979-luton-england/

52 Commer TS3 Don Everall Tours VJW 882

A Commer TS3-engined bus at the Isle of Wight Bus & Coach Museum‘s 2008 running day

Commer produced buses and is recorded as delivering four to Widnes in 1909. The Commando was released after the Second World War, and the Avenger on 28 February 1948, fitted with the TS3 engine from 1954.

Light commercial vehicles

Commer Light Pick-up

The Commer Light Pick-Up was a pickup truck based on the Hillman Minx saloon and produced by Commer during the 1950s; a similar Hillman-badged model was also produced. The Mark III was powered by a 1184 cc four-cylinder engine, the Mark VI by a 1265 cc unit and the Mark VIII by a 1390 cc engine. Production ended in about 1958.

Commer Express Delivery Van

The Commer Express Delivery Van was a light commercial vehicle produced by Commer during the 1950s, competing in the 8-10cwt van range. It was based on the Hillman Minx saloon and evolved in parallel with that model, with designations ranging from Mark III to Mark VIIIB. The 1957 model, which featured a load space of 100 cu ft (2.8 m3) and a payload of approximately 9 cwt, was powered by a 1390 cc four-cylinder Hillman engine and was fitted with a four-speed column-change gearbox.

Commer Cob

The Commer Cob is a 7 cwt delivery van introduced in early 1956 based on the Hillman Husky, itself a derivative of the Hillman Minx Mark VIII. In 1958 new Cob and Husky models were introduced, based on the “AudaxHillman Minx.

Commer Imp Van

Main article: Hillman Imp

The Commer Imp Van was introduced in September 1965 and was based on the Hillman Imp saloon. It was renamed as the Hillman Imp Van in October 1968, with total production reaching 18,194 units prior to it being phased out in July 1970. The Hillman Husky estate car, which was introduced in July 1967, was based on the Imp Van.

Commer BF

Ambulance_Coventry_Transport_Museum (1)

 Commer BF based ambulance

Many examples of these vans were coach-built as ice cream vans.

Commer Walk-Thru

Commer Walk-Thru van as used by the Dutch company Van Gend & Loos

 Commer Walk-Thru van as used by the Dutch company Van Gend & Loos

The Commer Walk-Thru was introduced in 1961 as a replacement for the Commer BF. The Walk-Thru was offered in 1½ ton, 2 ton and 3-ton van and cab-chassis variants with a choice of diesel or petrol engines.

Commer FC/PA/PB/Spacevan

Commer FC
1968 Commer FC
Overview
Manufacturer Rootes Group
Chrysler Europe
Production 1960–1982
Body and chassis
Body style Forward control panel van. Numerous conversions and adaptations to special purposes
Powertrain
Engine 1500 cc Straight-4
1725 cc Straight-4
Transmission 4-speed manual
4-speed manual + Laycock Overdrive (from 1973)
Dimensions
Length 170 in (4,318 mm)
Width 75 in (1,905 mm)
Chronology
Successor none

Commer became known in later years as a maker of vans for the British Post Office—particularly the Commer FC which was introduced in 1960 with many body styles, including a 1500 cc van. After engine and interior upgrades it was renamed the PB in 1967 and the SpaceVan in 1974. As noted above, it would be sold as a Dodge and Fargo model until 1976, when both Commer and Fargo names were dropped. These were rounded-front forward-control vans with narrow front track—a legacy of their Humber car-derived suspension. Utilising at first the Hillman-derived 1500 cc 4-cylinder engine in the PA series, then the larger 1600 cc, and from 1968 onwards the 1725 cc unit in the PB, only the cast-iron-head version of this engine were used. A Perkins 4108 diesel was also available.

The “1725 cc engine” (as it is known; it actually displaces 1724 cc) was available in the 1970s with a Borg Warner (BW) Model 35 3-speed automatic transmission with a dashboard-mounted selector. This was not a popular option and few were built.

The 4-speed gearbox on manual transmission models was based on those fitted to contemporary Hillman Minx (of the “Audax” generation) and later Rootes Arrow series cars such as the Hillman Hunter.

An unusual feature of the model was that the handbrake operated on the front drum brakes.

One of the reasons that the van was less popular with fleet operators than the Bedford and Ford Transit models it sold against was that, as on the BMC J2 and J4 models the forward-control design restricted access to the engine and made engine changes labour intensive; the only way to remove the engine without dropping the suspension subframe was to remove the windscreen and crane the engine out through the passenger door. A 1974 road test of a motor caravan version fitted with the 1725 cc engine reported a maximum speed of 70 mph (113 km/h) and a 0–50 mph (km/h) time of 25 seconds, indicating a higher top speed but, in this form, slower acceleration than the BMC competitor. However, the testers reported that at 70 mph the van was “plainly at its absolute limit, screaming away in a most distressing fashion”; readers were advised to view 65 mph (105 km/h) as a more realistic absolute maximum.

Reportedly, one condition of the government bailout of Chrysler’s British operations in 1976 was a commitment to upgrade the Spacevan, which was praised for its brakes, cornering, and price, but criticized for its power, comforts, and top speed. A revised Spacevan was thus introduced in 1977, using the same mechanicals but with numerous cosmetic changes, conveniences, and a new interior. Although outdated by its demise in 1982, by which time Commer had been taken over by Peugeot, the Spacevan remained a familiar sight in the UK thanks to its role with Post Office Telephones—which was almost solely responsible for it remaining in production for so long and these vans and outstanding orders were inherited by British Telecom on its formation in October 1981. By this time, there were three engines: two 1.7 L petrol engines of 37 kW (with low compression) and 42 kW (with high compression), and a small diesel engine (31 kW), with a four-speed manual transmission and no automatic available. The last Spacevan was built in 1983.

Military vehicles

1951 Commer Q4 330811951

Commer made a range of military vehicles for use during the Second World War, with the range still in use in the 1980s. While serving in the army, British humourist Frank Muir reported a broken-down vehicle over his radio with the words “The Commer has come to a full stop.”

Engines

Commer designed and manufactured its own diesel engines for its heavy commercial vehicles and buses. They were low-profile units designed to be deployed under the floor of the cab.

TS3

Main article: Commer TS3
1954 Commer tractor unit The front-mounted exhaust silencer shows that this is fitted with the Commer TS3 disel engine.

The TS3 engine was a two-stroke diesel unit with three cylinders each containing a pair of pistons arranged with the combustion chamber formed between the crown of the piston pair and the cylinder walls. It was designed specifically for the Commer range of trucks. The TS3 and derivative TS4 were unique in using rockers to deliver power to the single crankshaft.

TS4

The TS4 engine ran 1.2 million miles as a pre-production prototype. It was a 4-cylinder version of the TS3.

1909 Commer Car (EC 634) 1912 Commer WP2W 1930 Commer Parcel Van of the former London North Eastern Railway 1934 Commer Centaur 2 tonner 1934 Commer karrier B-20426 1936 Commer Lyons Tea 1939 Commer Q4 1940 Commer Q4 1946 Commer Q4 Utility Truck Engine 4700cc S6 1947 Commer B-32736 1947 Commer Q4 Tipper Engine Humber Hawk petrol Registered BCK 483 1948 Commer QX R7 released Mk1R7 1948 Commer QX 1949 Commer van HTO 1949 Commer with automatic loader 1950 Commer qx ts3 1950 Commer Superpoise UK 1951 Commer Q4 330811951 1951 Commer QX 1952 commer 05 1952 Commer 07 1952 Commer alle typen brochure a 1952 Commer alle typen brochure b 1952 Commer alle typen brochure d 1952 Commer C762 Showground truck 1952 Commer Superpoise Commer op erf; net thuis afgeleverd 1953 Commer 8,10 & 12 Ton a 1953 Commer 8,10 & 12 Ton b 1953 Commer 8,10 & 12 Ton c 1953 Commer Karrier Bantam Registered ODV 364 OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA 1953 Commer Type Mk.III 1953 commer- 1954 Commer C Type Mk.III Tipper  Registered CSV 268 1954 Commer Q2 FS V4 33 1954 Commer tractor unit The front-mounted exhaust silencer shows that this is fitted with the Commer TS3 disel engine. 1954 Commer' truck-based armoured car, 1950s 1955 Commer Superpoise 6x6 1955 Commer ts3 1956 Commer + VW Orion 1956 Commer Emergency Tender 1956 Commer Karrier at Carnoustie 1956 Commer Q4 (FV-13201), 4x4 1956 Commer Superpoise 25 cwt MkIV 1956 Commer uit 1956 met een carrosserie van fa. Rondaan Berlikum, een DAF uit 1950 en een Bedford uit 1954 1956 Commer WrT Escape. Fire Engine 1957 CHW Commer Ambulance 1957 Commer 57 Ramblers on KAT rig 1957 Commer Karrier 1957 COMMER VAN Black 1958 Commer C Series Dropside Registered LSU 422 1958 Commer Groet RS-75-43 1958 Commer MUR530 Farming Yesteryear 1958 Commer Q4 1958 Commer Van Gend & Loos RN-85-86 1958 Commer WDG655 1959 Commer bestelwagen 1959 Commer Ecurie Ecosse 1959 Commer img314 1959 Commer Karrier 4,752cc KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA 1959 Commer Knocker with history 1959 Commer QX 1959 Commer R541 Assen 1959 Commer WrE - WYA 559 1959 Commer 1960 Commer 01 1960 Commer 1,1.5 T Brochure 1960 Commer 3 vierde ton Brochure 1960 Commer Avenger TS3 Transporter Engine 4200cc ECURIE ECOSSE 1960 Commer Carmichael 1960 COMMER COB 1960 Commer Karrier Model F Mk V 1960 Commer Miles NDG 690 1960 commer stw draw 1960-71 Commer Caravanette PA 1600 cc 1960-82 Commer FA-PB-Spacevan 1960-82 Commer FC-PB-Spacevan Van Powered by either a 1500cc or 1725cc S4 1961 Commer b 1961 Commer catalog 1961 COMMER FIRE ENGINE 6000cc 2998VF 1961 Commer Fire Tender Engine 6000cc VF 1961 Commer img315 1961 Commer Water Carrier Manchester airport 1962 Ambulance Commer Light Truck Ambulance Warrnombool 1962 Commer Bl 1962 Commer Busje 1962 Commer Hengelo 3 1962 Commer img316 1962 Commer Sleeping car 1962 commer-1500-2500-Motor Manuel 1963 Bussen Commer Beetles 1963 1963 Commer Bus White 1963 Commer Catalogue 1963 Commer Delivery van 1963 Commer FC .75 ton Van Hearse 1963 Commer qx 1963 Commer СВ (FV-13901), 4x4 1964 Ambulance Commer 2500 1964 Bussen Commer built in 1964 with Harrington B12 bodywork 1964 CC Model Commer 1964 Commer 727BWC 1964 Commer ACE Bus Australia 1964 Commer Camper 1964 Commer FC Van 1964 Commer Walk Thru Bus 1964 Commer Walk-Thru [KC40] 1964 Commer-Coaster-Dormobile-Conversion 1965 Commer Ambu 1965 COMMER COB 1500cc VAN DYK32C 1965 Commer VB Flatback Registration EDD 451 C 1965 commer-bus-01 olympic 1966 commer 06 1966 Commer CC Maxiload Registered JAH 575 D 1966 Commer type KAL 4023 1966 Commer Van Grey 1966 Commer VCA 715 1966 Commer VV-99-42 1966 Commer WrT L 1966 Commer XA-50-64 1967 Commer Brochure a 1967 Commer GGJ 1967-COMMER-CC15-TRUCK-HISTORY-PHOTO-SPEC-SHEET 1968 Commer Camper ZA 71 58 1968 Commer FBH 398 ZJ-08-54 1968 Commer FC 1968 Commer Flat Bed PB WPG 1968 Commer Kampeerwagen 1968 commer santana velocidad 1968 publicidad pegasoesmicamion 1968 Commer type FBH398 Bouwjaar 23-07-1968 1968 Commer VCA 715 1969 ce16 commer knocker 1969 Commer - Dodge VCC40 walk Thru 1969 Commer CE Maxiload Bulk Tipper Registered UVF 988 H 1969 Commer Horsebox 1969 Commer img311 1971 Commer Maxiload gvw 1973 Commer Maxiload Moteur Perkins 1974 Commer Schiphol Oost 1974 Commer TS Ambulance Commer Commer (2) Commer 0001 Commer 02 COMMER 2 (2) COMMER 2 Cementwagen Commer 2 Commer 03 commer 100 ft ladder Commer 504 londres (222) Commer AD KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA Commer Bantam Airfield Control (GFU 659 L) Commer Beveren (B) Commer BF based ambulance Commer Brandweer Ambulance Commer Brandweer Hengelo Commer Bus of Fire Engine Commer Car Hauler Commer CC 15 Triple Deck Car Transporter Commer Daver coe Commer Devenish CASTLE COMBE STEAM RALLY 2009 commer folder Commer Garmt Molenhuis, Broek Pieterburen Commer Hauler commer Herder commer knowles Commer ladderwagen uit 1950, de ladderconstructie is van Merryweather Commer Maxiload schiedam Commer Q25 Van Commer Superpoise Commer truck at the Whitton Museum Commer TS3 Commer Van commer vans poster Commer Walk-Thru van as used by the Dutch company Van Gend & Loos commer

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Author: Jeroen

In Dutch, my homelanguage: Ik ben Jeroen, tot januari 2015 was ik al dik 26 jaar werkzaam in een psychiatrisch ziekenhuis in een stad vlakbij Werelds grootste havenstad Rotterdam. Eerst als verpleegkundige/begeleider op high care, later op afdeling dubbeldiagnose (verslavingen) en ook nog een tijdje als administratief medewerker. Ik heb een spierziekte "Poli Myositis" (alle spieren zijn ontstoken) daardoor weinig energie. Sinds augustus 2015 is daarbij de diagnose Kanker gesteld, en ben ik helemaal arbeidsongeschikt geworden en zit middenin de behandelfase. Gelukkig ben ik daarnaast getrouwd, vader, en opa, en heb de nodige hobby's. Een daarvan is transportmiddelen verzamelen en daarmee een blog schrijven. Dit blog begon met bussen, maar nu komen ook sleepboten, auto's trucks en dergelijke aan bod. Kijk en geniet met me mee, reageer, en vul gerust aan. Fouten zal ik ook graag verbeteren. In English: I'm Jeroen, till januari 2015 I was already 26 years working as a nurse in a psychiatric hospital, near Rotterdam, Worlds biggest harbour with more than 98 nationalities living within it's borders. First I worked on closed high care ward and the last years on a ward with mainly addicted people. I liked my work very much. In 2007 I got ill. I got the diagnose Poli Myositis, a musscle dissease. Al my mussles are inflamed. And last august I got another diagnose. Cancer. It's plaveicelcel carcinoma and treated with Chemo and radioation. So I've even less energy than the last years. Still I try to make something of my life and the blog is helping with surviving with some pleasure.

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