AUTO CARRIER CARS Surrey England UK 1901- still going strong

AutoCarrier CARS GROUP Ltd.

I found more information about AC and more than 100 extra pictures, so that’s the reason most of this Blog will look the same as the one before, but keep looking, there is lots more.

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AC Cars Group Ltd.
Private
Industry Automotive
Founded West Norwood, London,United Kingdom (1901)
Founder The Weller Brothers
Headquarters Thames Ditton, Surrey, United Kingdom
Key people
Alan Lubinsky, current owner
Products Automobile
Parent ACEDES Holdings
Website AC Cars official page

1924 A.C. Royal RoadsterA.C. Royal Roadster 1924

1935 A.C. 16-70 Sports Drophead CoupéA.C. 16/70 Sports Drophead Coupé 1935

1955 AC-2litre UKA.C. 2-Litre 1947-1956. The four-door configuration and the wider 6.75 × 16 inch wheels identify this as a later example. The flashing indicators will have been retro-fitted.

1949 Seven of the 28 Southend Pier Railway cars, built by AC-CarsSeven of the 28 Southend Pier Railway cars, built by AC-Cars in 1949

1957 AC Aceca Bristol prepared for the Carrera Panamericana Mexican road race1957 AC Aceca Bristol prepared for the “Carrera Panamericana” Mexican road race

1958 AC Ace, AC engined1958 AC Ace, AC engined

1962 A.C. Greyhound SaloonA.C. Greyhound Saloon 1962

1976 AC Invalid CarriageWhile the company’s sporting cars won plaudits from many enthusiasts, it was the long-running contract with the UK government for the production of three-wheeled invalid carriages that may have most impressed those concerned for the company’s financial stability.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA1999 Cobra Replica

1971 AC 428 Convertible1971 AC Frua

1973 AC ME3000 yellow1979 AC 3000ME

AC Cars Ltd. formerly known as Auto Carriers Ltd., is a British specialist automobile manufacturer and one of the oldest independent car makers founded in Britain.

History

The first car from what eventually became AC was presented at the Crystal Palace motor show in 1903; it was a 20 HP touring car and was displayed under the Weller name. The Weller Brothers of West Norwood, London, planned to produce an advanced 20 hp (15 kW) car. However, their financial backer and business manager John Portwine, a butcher, thought the car would be too expensive to produce and encouraged Weller to design and produce a little delivery three-wheeler. Weller did so, called it the Auto-Carrier, and a new company was founded and named Autocars and Accessories; production started in 1904. The vehicle caught on quickly and was a financial success. In 1907, a passenger version appeared, called the A.C. Sociable. It had a seat in place of the cargo box. The A.C. Sociable was described in a review of the 1912 Motor Cycle and Cycle Car Show asone of the most popular cycle cars on the road, both for pleasure and business, and A.C. displayed eight vehicles on their stand, six for pleasure and 2 for business. The single rear wheel contained a two-speed hub, and the single cylinder engine was mounted just in front of it, with rear chain drive.

The company became Auto Carriers Ltd. in 1911 and moved to Ferry Works, Thames Ditton, Surrey—at this time they also began using the famed “AC” roundel logo. Their first four-wheeled car was produced in 1913; it was a sporty little two-seater with a gearbox on the rear axle. Only a few were built before production was interrupted by the first World War.

During the Great War, the Ferry Works factory produced shells and fuses for the war effort, although at least one vehicle was designed and built for the War Office. At the end of the First World War, AC Cars started making motor vehicles again, designing and building many successful cars at Ferry Works, as well as expanding into an old balloon factory on Thames Ditton High Street.

After the war, John Weller started on the design of a new overhead-cam 6-cylinder engine. The first versions of this design were running by 1919. The Weller engine would be produced until 1963; it is possibly the second-longest-lived production motor in history after the Volkswagen boxer. In 1921, Selwyn Edge (who had been with Napier & Son) bought shares in the company and was appointed governing director. He did not get along with Weller or Portwine, who resigned less than a year later. In 1922, the name changed again to AC Cars Ltd.

In customary fashion Edge sought publicity for the company through motoring competition. In 1921 Sammy Davis joined A.C. as a driver, competing in the Junior Car Club 200-mile (320 km) race, for cars up to 1,500 c.c., at Brooklands. In 1923  and 1924 J.A. Joyce won the Brighton Speed Trials driving an A.C. In May 1924, at Montlhéry, near Paris, T. G. Gillett broke the continuous 24-hour record in a 2-litre A.C., fitted with special streamlined bodywork, covering a distance of 1,949.3 miles. In 1926 the Honourable Victor Bruce, an AC employee, won the Monte Carlo Rally in his 2-litre AC. In 1927, Victor Bruce, with his wife Mildred (The Hon Mrs Victor Bruce), assisted by J.A. Joyce, set a 10-day endurance record at Montlhéry, driving an AC Six.

Selwyn Edge bought the company outright for £135,000 in 1927 and re-registered it as AC (Acedes) Ltd but sales, which had been falling, continued to decline. The company was caught by the crash of 1929 and went into voluntary liquidation. Production ceased for a time, and the company was sold to the Hurlock family who ran a successful haulage business. They wanted the High Street factory only as a warehouse (Ferry Works was not acquired), but allowed the service side of AC to continue.

A single car was made for William Hurlock in 1930. He liked it and agreed to restart very limited production, mainly using components left over from previous models. An agreement was reached with Standard to supply new chassis, the ancient three-speed transaxle was replaced by a modern four-speed gearbox (built in unit with the engine), and by 1932 a new range of cars was finally launched. Production continued on this small scale, averaging less than 100 vehicles per year, until the outbreak of the Second World War in 1939. The final pre-war car was delivered in June 1940, after which the factory was fully involved with war production.

After the Second World War

Production of cars restarted in 1947 with the 2-Litre and also a large contract with the government to produce the fiberglass-bodied, single seat, Thundersley Invacar type 57 invalid carriages with BSA engines. The 2-Litre used an updated version of the pre-war underslung chassis fitted with the AC straight-six and traditional ash-framed and aluminium-panelled saloon or convertible coachwork. The invalid carriages continued to be built until 1976 and were an important source of revenue to the company. They also built an aluminum-bodied three-wheeled microcar, the Petite. They also produced “Bag Boy” golf carts (with independent suspension to the two wheels!). In 1949, AC Cars also produced four trains, each consisting three power cars and four coaches, for the Southend Pier Railway in Essex. These remained in use until 1976.

In 1953, the firm began production of the AC Ace, a lightweight chassis designed by John Tojeiro with the venerable Weller-designed 2-Litre engine. Soon after, car dealer and racing driver Ken Rudd fitted his own competition Ace with a pre-war BMW-designed, Bristol-produced 135 bhp (101 kW) six-cylinder engine. This combination was put into production as the AC Ace-Bristol in 1957. In this form, the car raced at Le Mans in 1957 and 1958.

For 1954, a new aluminum-bodied closed coupe was unveiled at Earls Court, the AC Aceca. It was only slightly heavier than the convertible Ace, and because of better aerodynamics was actually slightly faster (128 mph (206 km/h) top speed). Only 328 Acecas were produced, and they were equipped with either of the Ace’s engines. There was a demand from some customers for a larger four-seater car, for whom AC produced the Greyhound. This was built on a stretched Ace chassis with coil suspension all around and a 2.2-litre Bristol engine.

In 1961, Bristol stopped producing their own engines—and once again, Ken Rudd came to the rescue, suggesting that AC use a 6-cylinder engine from the Ford Zephyr. These engines when fitted with the Raymond Mays twelve-port alloy head and Weber carburetors could be made to produce a safe 170 bhp (127 kW) and a 125 mph (201 km/h) top speed. The AC Ace 2.6 (as it is latterly known today) is for many people the prettiest Ace of all—and undoubtedly the rarest, with only 37 such cars built. To fit the Zephyr engine, AC had to modify the frame, relocate the steering box and completely change the nose of the car. These changes are often mistakenly attributed to Carroll Shelby.

Today, Acecas are popular at historic racing events. Arch McNeill, a factory Morgan racer from the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s told fellow Texan and Aceca owner Glenn Barnett that “the Morgan team spent two years campaigning to beat the factory AC Acecas and finally did in the late 1950s”. Though more valuable than comparable AC or Shelby replicas, the Aceca is still a bargain when compared to a Shelby CSX Cobra, while maintaining similar performance.

The company also ventured briefly into railway rolling stock business, building five four-wheel railbuses for British Rail in 1958.

Carroll Shelby and the Cobra

In 1962, AC was approached by Carroll Shelby to use a small block Ford V8 engine in the Ace chassis, producing the AC Cobra. Shelby needed a car that could compete with the Chevrolet Corvette in US sports car racing. The resulting Cobra was a very powerful roadster, and it is commonly blamed for the introduction of the 70 mph (110 km/h) limit on British motorways. While this was a major factor in the decision, after a coupe version was caught doing 196 mph (315 km/h) during a test run, a then-recent spate of accidents under foggy conditions also helped the introduction of the limit.

At the end of the 1964 racing season, the Cobra was being outclassed in sports car racing by Ferrari. Carroll Shelby decided he needed a bigger engine. A big block Ford FE series 390 V8 was installed in a Cobra and the result was scary—the car was virtually undrivable. It was decided that a completely new chassis was needed. With the combined help of Ford’s computers and the experience of the AC engineers, the new MKIII was born with 4-inch (100 mm) main tubes instead of 3-inch (76 mm) for the chassis, huge cross-braced shock towers and coil springs all around. This, along with a bigger 427 ci version of the FE, made the new AC Cobra MKIII an absolutely unbeatable 2,200 lb (1,000 kg) race car. Specifically, the engine that was installed in the car was Ford’s famed 427 FE NASCAR “Side-Oiler” V8, a power-house engine developing 425 bhp (317 kW) in its mildest street version. Unfortunately, the car missed homologation for the 1965 season and was not raced by the Shelby team. However, it was raced successfully by many privateers and went on to win races all the way into the 1970s. The AC 427 Cobra, although a commercial failure when in production, has now become one of the most sought-after and replicated automobiles ever.

It was produced in two versions: a street model with a tamer motor, optional dual carburetors, a glove box, and exhaust running under the car, and a competition version with a stripped interior, no glove box, different instrument layout and revised suspension. The competition version also had a more powerful motor with only one carburetor, side exhausts, a roll bar and wider fenders to accommodate racing tires. At the end in 1966, Shelby was left with 31 unsold competition cars; he decided to sell them to the general public under the name of Cobra 427 S/C or Semi-Competition. Today these S/C cars are the most sought after models and can sell in excess of 1.5 million dollars.

Carroll Shelby sold the Cobra name to Ford in 1965 and went on to develop the famed racing Ford GT40.

Meanwhile, AC went on producing a milder version of the 427 MK III Cobra for the European market fitted with the small block Ford motor. The car was called the AC 289 and 27 were produced.

AC 428 or Frua and AC 429

AC 428 FruaAC 428 Frua

At the same time, the company realized they needed a grand tourer model that could appeal to wealthy customers. AC contacted the famed Italian coach builder Pietro Frua to design an appealing GT body that could be fitted on a MKIII Cobra chassis stretched by 6 inches (150 mm). The new car was shown at the 1965 Turin show. A few early models were fitted with the famed 427 Ford FE motors. In 1967 the long-stroked 428 motor became available and the car was known as the AC Frua. Built out of steel rather than AC’s usual aluminum, the Frua is heavier than a Cobra at slightly under 3,000 lb (1,400 kg). That said, it is still a light and very fast automobile built on a racing chassis. The car was never fully developed and the cost of sending chassis from England to Italy and back for final assembly made it so expensive that only a few were produced. Production ended in 1973 after only 80 cars (29 convertibles and 51 coupes) were finished.

In 1970, a special version of the coupé was built. It was based on an extended bodyshell that Frua built for Monteverdi which was supposed to become the second Monteverdi 375/L. After the alliance of Monteverdi and Frua split off in Summer 1969, that bodyshell remained in the Frua works in Turin. A year or so later Frua changed some details on front and rear, including some semi-hidden headlamps which had been seen on the Iso Lele and the Iso Grifo, second series, before. The car was called AC 429; it remained a one-off.

3000ME

The 1970s were not a good period for luxury car manufacturers and Derek Hurlock went searching for a totally new smaller car. Mid-engined designs were in fashion at the time and in 1972 the Diablo, a prototype with an Austin Maxi engine and transaxle, was built by privateers Peter Bohanna and Robin Stables. In much the same way as they had taken up the Tojeiro prototype and turned it into the Ace, AC acquired the rights and at the 1973 London Motor Show showed their own version, the mid-engined ME3000 with the 3.0-litre Ford Essex V6 engine installed transversely over a bespoke AC-designed gearbox. Development was virtually complete in 1976 when new Type Approval regulations were introduced. A prototype failed the 30 mph (48 km/h) crash test, and the chassis had to be redesigned. On the second attempt, the car passed with flying colours. This was a huge achievement for a tiny firm—Vauxhall had to make several attempts before the contemporary Chevette passed. For AC, such delays meant that the first production cars (now renamed 3000ME) were not delivered until 1979, by which time they were in direct competition with the Lotus Esprit. Although comfortable, brisk, nicely built and practical, AC’s ambitions of selling 250 cars per year were a distant memory. After just 71 cars were sold, Hurlock called a halt to production as his health was suffering and the company was struggling in the teeth of a recession. In 1984, production stopped at Thames Ditton and the car and the AC name were licenced to a new company registered as AC (Scotland) plc run by David McDonald in a new factory in Hillington, Glasgow. Here, 30 cars were built, including a development car tested with Alfa Romeo‘s 2.5-litre V6 engine and a nearly complete Mark 2 prototype of the same. Regardless (or possibly because) of these developments, AC Scotland called in the receivers in 1985. After selling the historic High Street works for redevelopment, AC themselves soldiered on as a service operation in the “21st Century” works on Summer Road until the Hurlock family finally sold their holdings in 1986 to William West. After some complex machinations the company was split between property interests and the car brand; the former was renamed and the latter was acquired by Brian Angliss.

Brian Angliss era

In 1982 Brian Angliss was running Autokraft, a Cobra restoration shop, parts supplier and replica manufacturer. To further such pursuits, he acquired some of the tooling from Thames Ditton and created the MKIV; the car had US-spec 5 mph (8.0 km/h) bumpers, a federalized motor, and a larger interior with modern switchgear. About 480 cars were produced in his factory at Brooklands. He also produced a lightweight model which was more in tune with the original Cobra spirit, though it could not be imported to the US due to Federal regulations.

Early cars were sold as the Autokraft MKIV but eventually Angliss acquired the rights to use the AC name. Derek Hurlock had been strongly protective of the name, but Angliss’ high standards of craftsmanship won him over. When the Hurlock family finally sold up in 1986 Angliss fully acquired the AC trademark rights and set up a new AC company as a joint venture with Ford, who had also recently bought Aston Martin. A big conflict followed over the future direction for AC, but Angliss eventually won his independence as well as Ford’s continuing and essential cooperation as an engine and parts supplier.

Also interested in aircraft, Angliss restored a Hawker Hurricane XIIB at Brooklands as well as acquiring two ex–Indian Air Force Hawker Tempest IIs as future projects. The Hurricane was registered as G-HURR and was destroyed in a fatal accident at the Shoreham air show in 2007.

Angliss looked for a new car to complement and perhaps replace the MKIV. At the 1993 London Motor Show, he introduced a new vehicle that he named the AC Ace. It was a modern automobile with a stainless steel chassis and an aluminum body, but was expensive to develop and build. The costs hit Angliss hard and he sold his large motor bike collection, vintage Bentley and other assets to try to make ends meet. The receivers were called in by 1996 after approximately 50 “new” Aces had been built.

AC (1996–present)

In March 1996, largely due to the cost of developing the new Ace, Angliss’ company went into receivership and was eventually sold to Pride Automotive in December 1996, who continued car production in Weybridge, Surrey under the name of AC Car Group Ltd. The AC trademarks and intellectual property were transferred to Acedes Holdings, LLC. Both the Cobra Mk IV and the Ace were made, and soon a ‘CRS’ version of the Mk IV was announced with a carbon fibre body shell, a 212 S/C version with Lotus twin turbo V8 power, as well as the AC Superblower with a supercharger Ford V8. Two or three closed Aceca coupe versions of the Ace were also made.

In 2003, Carroll Shelby International and AC Motor Holdings, Ltd. announced production of an authentic Shelby/AC Cobra, with the production vehicle arriving at dealers in July 2004. Initially, available models included Shelby AC 427 S/C Cobra and Shelby AC 289 FIA Cobra, which would be branded as the CSX 1000 and CSX 7500 Series, respectively. In February 2004, the first handcrafted aluminum body shell was built.

Due to rising costs in the UK, AC relocated to Malta in 2005 and started production of the carbon-fibre bodied AC MkV. Due to problems with the factory building, production ceased in 2007.

In 2007, AC announced a joint venture with Brooklands Motor Company (the spiritual successor of Autokraft) in Weybridge, Surrey, UK and confirmed plans for the continuation of the traditional AC designed tubular chassis and aluminium bodied models.

AC Heritage seem to be the owners of certain models, as their website lists two, both of the original design. More importantly, because their models are made in the “origin” country of where AC Cars started over a century ago, then the heritage of these cars is retained. Whereas, the model made in Germany would not follow the heritage of company, and so would not be an “authentic” AC branded car, much like a Ferrari would not be seen as a “genuine” Ferrari if it were made in China. Their website reveals their adherence to the history of the company.

In April 2009, a joint venture in Germany was announced to manufacture the new AC MKVI. Following a supply deal with GM, the AC MKVI had a totally new spaceframe chassis, 6.2 litre V8 engine and 6-speed manual transmission, and new Corvette brakes, retaining the original shape in lightweight composite material with the moulds taken from an original AC MKIII body. Following extensive development the car went into series production in July 2012 after two years of intense prototyping.

In 2010, AC announced a joint venture with the USA-based company Iconic which resulted in the design of the ultimate “Cobra”: the “Iconic AC Roadster”.

Acedes Holdings, LLC is the current owner of AC Cars.

At the Geneva Motor Show in 2012, AC Cars showed three different models: the AC MK VI, AC MK II, and AC 378 GT Zagato.

Car models

The AutoCarrier 648 cc

single-cylinder air-cooled 1904–1914Three-wheeler goods carrier with single wheel at rear and driver behind the load. Chain drive to rear wheel via two-speed epicyclic gearbox.

AC Auto Carrier Auto Carrier 1 Auto Carrier Autocarrier

AC Sociable

648 cc single-cylinder air-cooledPossibly 1800 1907–1914 Passenger version of the Auto Carrier from 1907 with driver and passenger side by side (2-seater) or driver behind (3-seater).

1908 AC Sociable Runabout AC Sociable 1910 1911 700cc AC Sociable 1911 AC Sociable 1912 AC Sociable a 1912 AC Sociable 1914 AC Sociable AC Sociable Description

AC Ten

1096 cc four-cylinder water-cooled About 100 1913–1916 Engine made by Fivet of France. Transmission by Transaxle (combined rear axle and gearbox). Two-seater and dickey or Sports two-seater. Optional 1327 cc engine pre war, standard post war.

AC-Ten 4

The AC 12 hp

1478/1992 cc four-cylinder water-cooledApprox 850 including six-cylinder models to 19291920–1927 Engine made by Anzani or later Cubitt in Aylesbury. Transmission by three-speed transaxle. Two- or four-seater bodies.

1916 AC 12HP 1920 ac-12-hp-tourer 1924 A.C. Royal Roadster 1924 AC Royal Roadster 12hp 1925 AC 12HP Royal Four Seater 1926 AC Royal 12hp Tourer

1928 AC 12hp Coupe

The AC Six (16/40, 16/56 and 16/66)

1478/1991 cc six-cylinder water-cooledApprox 850 including 12 hp models to 1929 plus 50 assembled from parts 1930–33.1920–1929Engine made by A.C. Larger capacity from 1922. 16/66 had triple SU carburetors. Transmission by 3-speed transaxle. Two- or four-seater bodies.

1930 AC 16-56 16-66 1930 AC 16-56 Magna AC Six (16-40, 16-56 and 16-66) car a AC Six (16-40, 16-56 and 16-66) car b AC Six (16-40, 16-56 and 16-66) car Acedes Royal 16-40 Acedes Magna 16-56 & 16-66

The AC Six (16/60, 16/70, 16/80 and 16/90)

1991 cc six-cylinder water-cooled 618 1932 to 1940 1932–1940 Engine made by AC; 16/90 was supercharged with an Arnott blower. Transmission by four-speed ENV, Moss synchromesh or Wilson pre-selector gearbox. Longer and wider than previous Six. Chassis overslung 1932-33, underslung 1933-1939, overslung 1939-1940.

 1935 A.C. 16-70 Sports Drophead Coupé ac six 1680 competition red retro side view cars grass AC Six 1680 Iepazisti-auto-AC-Cars-5

The AC 2-Litre

1284 1947–1958 Engine made by A.C. Two- and four-door saloons, drophead coupé and tourer bodies.

1947 AC 2-litre 1948 AC 2 Litre Saloon Shooting Brake 1949 AC 2 Litre 1949 AC 2-Litre 4 Door Saloon 1949 AC 2-litre Saloon 1949 AC 2000 Buckland b 1950 AC 2litre saloon 1950 AC 2-Litre Sports Tourer 1951 AC 2 Litre 2 Door Saloon 8999160611 AC 2-litre 1952 AC 2000 4d olw764goodwood06-2-2 1953 4drsalooncloseup_sm 1953 ac 1953 2 litre saloon 4d 1955 AC 2-litre 2-door Essex 1955 AC-2litre UK

The AC Petite

350 cc single-cylinder two-stroke Approx 4000 1952–1958 Engine made by Villiers. Four-speed gearbox. Three-wheeler with single front wheel. Two/three-seater.

1952 AC Petite at Buckland factory 1953 A C Petite ad a 1953 AC Petite ad 1954 AC Ace 16-56 Family Saloon 1956 AC Petite a 1956 AC Petite logo 1956 AC Petite Mk II 1956 AC Petite 1957 AC Ace Bristol ad AC Petite Mk II AC Petite AC_Cars_logo

The AC Aceca

Aceca
1958 AC Aceca Coupe

1958 AC Aceca.
Overview
Manufacturer AC Cars
Production 1954–1963
Body and chassis
Class Grand tourer
Related AC Ace
Powertrain
Engine 2.0 or 2.6 L I6
Transmission 4-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase 90 in (2,286 mm)
Length 153.5 in (3,899 mm)
Width 61 in (1,549 mm)
Curb weight 2120 lb (962 kg)

The Aceca (pronounced “A-See-Ka”) is a closed coupé from the British AC Cars company, produced from 1954 until 1963. The car originally had an AC engine but the similar Bristol-engined Aceca-Bristol was also available alongside the original from 1956 to 1963 when production of the engine ceased. A few cars were built from 1961 to 1963 with a 2553 cc tuned Ford Zephyr engine and sold as the Aceca 2.6.

Based on the open two-seat AC Ace, the Aceca was a hand-built grand tourer in the British tradition, with ash wood and steel tubing used in their construction. One notable feature was the hatchback at the rear, making the Aceca only the second car, after the 1953 Aston Martin DB2/4, to incorporate this element.

151 Acecas, 169 Aceca-Bristols and 8 Ford-engined models had been built when production halted in 1963.

The main difference between the Aceca and Aceca-Bristol was the engine. Both used a straight-6 unit, but the Aceca shared its 90 hp (67 kW), 1,991 cc (121.5 cu in) overhead camshaft AC engine with the lighter AC Ace, while the Aceca-Bristol used a 125 hp (93 kW) “D-Type” 2.0 L (1971 cc/120 in³) unit sourced from Bristol Cars. The Aceca-Bristol was also available with a milder “B-Type” Bristol engine of 105 hp (78 kW). The Bristol specification added $1000 to the Aceca’s $5,400 price tag in the United States. In the UK, the basic car cost £1722.

The front-end styling of the Ace and Aceca reportedly traces back to a design done by Pinin Farina for AC in the late 1940s. The car is rather light owing to a tubular frame, aluminium engine block and aluminium body panels. Large 16″ spoked road wheels and near 50/50 weight distribution allowed exceptional handling on substandard pavements. Later Acecas feature front-wheel disc brakes (added in 1957), while all share transverse leaf spring IRS, articulated rear half-axles, worm-gear steering, an optional overdrive on 2nd, 3rd and 4th gears, curved windshield, and leather-covered bucket seats. The suspension is independent at the front and rear using transverse leaf springs.

Aceca-Bristol

1957 AC Bristol Aceca rearBristol-engined AC Aceca (1957)

The in-line six Bristol engine fitted to the Aceca-Bristol was based on a design from BMW with cast iron block and aluminium cylinder head. It has a single camshaft with pushrods running vertically to a rocker shaft on the inlet side of the engine and further horizontal pushrods running in 6 tubes over the top of the engine in order to reach the exhaust rockers. The two inclined rocker covers give the engine a similar appearance to an overhead – camshaft arrangement. Three inline Solex downdraft carburettors bolted directly to the cylinder head casting via small adaptor plates.

Driving

The car has a fairly hard ride owing to the stiff suspension and holds the road well in corners, with some oversteer. The narrow wheelbase is noticeable, though. On the downside, the 90 hp (67 kW) engine is best at higher rpm, so the 0-60 mph time is not exceptional. Other weaknesses include inadequate rear mirrors, even though the hatchback window affords a large rear view, a heating system that isn’t suited for cold winters, and inadequate soundproofing for easy passenger conversation when cruising above 75 mph (121 km/h). The gear-shift is more solid than smooth and has synchromesh on 2nd, 3rd and 4th gears, only.

AC Greyhound 1959 – 1963

AC Greyhound
1962 A.C. Greyhound Saloon
Overview
Manufacturer AC Cars
Production 1959–1963
83 made
Body and chassis
Class Coupé
Powertrain
Engine 2.0/2.2/2.5 litre I6
Transmission 4-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase 100 in (2,540 mm)
Length 175 in (4,445 mm)
Width 65.5 in (1,664 mm)
Height 53 in (1,346 mm)
Curb weight 2185 lb (991 kg)

The AC Greyhound (1959-1963) was a 2+2 version of the Ace and Aceca automobiles made by AC Cars of Thames Ditton, Surrey, England. The Greyhound, of which 83 examples were built, had a two-door, four-seater aluminium body, and inherited most of the technical components of the Ace and Aceca:

  • ladder-frame chassis
  • independent coil spring suspension front and rear. Unlike the Ace and Aceca the rear suspension used semi-trailing arms.
  • 4-speed manual gearbox, overdrive optional
  • rack and pinion steering;
  • 11.75 in (298 mm) disc brake front, 11 in (279 mm) drum brake rear

Various straight-six engines were fitted:

  • 1.991-litre AC Cars OHC (75 bhp @ 4500 rpm; 1000 kg)
  • 1.971-litre Bristol 100D2 OHV, (125 bhp @ 5750 rpm; 1015 kg)
  • 2.216-litre Bristol (105 bhp @ 4700 rpm; 1093 kg)
  • 2.553-litre Ford Zephyr (up to 170 bhp @ 5500; 1040 kg)

Three Greyhounds were left-hand drive; the rest were right-hand drive.

1962 AC Greyhound1962

A 2 litre Bristol engined car with overdrive tested by The Motor magazine in 1961 had a top speed of 110 mph (180 km/h) and could accelerate from 0-60 mph (97 km/h) in 11.4 seconds. A fuel consumption of 21.8 miles per imperial gallon (13.0 L/100 km; 18.2 mpg-US) was recorded. The test car cost £3185 including taxes.

The AC Cobra

AC Cobra
Shelby AC 427 Cobra vl blue

AC Cobra MkIII
Overview
Manufacturer AC Cars
Also called Shelby Cobra
Production 1962–1967
Assembly Thames Ditton, Surrey, England
Los Angeles, California, USA
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door roadster
Layout FR layout
Chronology
Predecessor AC Ace
Successor AC MK IV
MkI
1962 Shelby AC Cobra, CSX2000

CSX2000 – The first Cobra completed by Shelby
Overview
Production 1962–63
Powertrain
Engine 260 or 289 cu in (4.3 or 4.7 L) V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 90 in (2,286 mm)
Length 151.5 in (3,848 mm)
Width 61 in (1,549 mm)
Height 49 in (1,245 mm)
Curb weight 2,019 lb (916 kg)
MkII
1963 AC Shelby Cobra Mk II

1963 MkII 289 (FIA Roadster)
Overview
Production 1963–65
Powertrain
Engine 289 cu in (4.7 L) V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 90 in (2,286 mm)
Length 151.5 in (3,848 mm)
Width 61 in (1,549 mm)
Height 49 in (1,245 mm)
Curb weight 2,315 lb (1,050 kg)
MkIII
1966 Shelby AC Cobra photographed in Laval, Quebec, Canada at the Auto classique Laval.

1966 AC Cobra 427 (North America)
Overview
Production 1965–67
Powertrain
Engine 427 or 289 cu in (7.0 or 4.7 L) V8
Dimensions
Wheelbase 90 in (2,286 mm)
Length 156 in (3,962 mm)
Width 68 in (1,727 mm)
Height 48 in (1,219 mm)
Curb weight 2,355 lb (1,068 kg)

The AC Cobra, sold as the Ford/Shelby AC Cobra in the United States and often known colloquially as the Shelby Cobra in that country, is an American-engined British sports car produced intermittently since 1962.

History and development

Like many British specialist manufacturers, AC Cars had been using the Bristol straight-6 engine in its small-volume production, including its AC Ace two-seater roadster. This had a hand-built body with a steel tube frame, and aluminium body panels that were made using English wheeling machines. The engine was a pre-World War II design of BMW which by the 1960s was considered dated. Bristol decided in 1961 to cease production of its engine and instead to use Chrysler 331 cu in (5.4 L) V8 engines. AC started using the 2.6 litre Ford Zephyr engine in its cars. In September 1961, American automotive designer Carroll Shelby wrote to AC asking if they would build him a car modified to accept a V8 engine. AC agreed, provided a suitable engine could be found. Shelby went to Chevrolet to see if they would provide him with engines, but not wanting to add competition to the Corvette they said no. However, Ford wanted a car that could compete with the Corvette and they happened to have a brand new engine which could be used in this endeavor: Ford’s 260 in³ HiPo (4.2 L) engine – a new lightweight, thin-wall cast small-block V8 tuned for high performance. Ford provided Shelby with two engines. In January 1962 mechanics at AC Cars in Thames Ditton, Surrey fitted the prototype chassis CSX2000 with a 260 ci Ford V8 borrowed from Ford in the UK; the 221 ci was never sent. However, early engineering drawings were titled “AC Ace 3.6”. After testing and modification, the engine and transmission were removed and the chassis was air-freighted to Shelby in Los Angeles on 2 February 1962. His team fitted it with an engine and transmission in less than eight hours at Dean Moon‘s shop in Santa Fe Springs, California, and began road-testing.

Production

Production proved to be easy, since AC had already made most of the modifications needed for the small-block V8 when they installed the 2.6 L Ford Zephyr engine, including the extensive rework of the AC Ace’s front end bodywork. The most important modification was the fitting of a stronger rear differential to handle the increased engine power. A Salisbury 4HU unit with inboard disk brakes to reduce unsprung weight was chosen instead of the old ENV unit. It was the same unit used on the Jaguar E-Type. On the production version, the inboard brakes were moved outboard to reduce cost. The only modification of the front end of the first Cobra from that of the AC Ace 2.6 was the steering box, which had to be moved outward to clear the wider V8 motor.

AC exported completed, painted and trimmed cars (less engine and gearbox) to Shelby who then finished the cars in his workshop in Los Angeles by installing the engine and gearbox and correcting any bodywork flaws caused by the car’s passage by sea. A small number of cars were also completed on the East Coast of the USA by Ted Hugus in Pennsylvania.

The first 75 Cobra Mark I (including the prototype) were fitted with the 260 cu in (4.3 L). The remaining 51 Mark I model were fitted with a larger version of the Windsor Ford engine, the 289 cu in (4.7 L) V8. In late 1962 Alan Turner, AC’s chief engineer completed a major design change of the car’s front end to accommodate rack and pinion steering while still using transverse leaf spring suspension. The new car entered production in early 1963 and was designated Mark II. The steering rack was borrowed from the MGB while the new steering column came from the VW Beetle. About 528 Mark II Cobras were produced to the summer of 1965 (the last US-bound Mark II was produced in November 1964).

Since late 1962 when the new GM Stingray was shown up briefly by the Mk1 Cobra (until hub failure intervened) the development of the Grand Sport Corvette program had continued at a pace and was thought to be going for a build series of 125 cars. This would allow GM to compete directly in the FIA GT class of racing. Just to compound this Enzo Ferrari was trying to pull another “fast one” on the FIA with the request for the homologation of the 250LM. The FIA had not forgotten the serious lack of production of the 250GTO, which it had granted homologation in advance of Enzo’s assured 100 minimum per year. Just thirty-six were produced over three years with two very different chassis, neither of which were too similar to the 250 GT which was supposed to form the basis of the vehicle. In an effort to prepare for the task ahead alternative engines were considered. The 289 cu in (4.7 L) leaf-spring Cobra dominated the US domestic race series (USRRC), with only one race lost in three years. The results in the FIA GT class were different. This was mainly due to the number of circuits that had much higher sustained speeds. Aerodynamics were more important and put the roadster at a disadvantage. As a result, coupe versions were built.

A stroker 289 (325),and the larger 390/427 up to the “cammer” 427 was considered. Shelby was told at the eleventh hour to use the iron 427 cu in (7.0 L). There was little time to fully develop a competition vehicle. The coil spring Cobra production was slow and an insufficient number made to meet FIA’s GT homologation. Therefore the S/C (Semi – Competition) was produced by making available to the general production the full race options for the street. By now Enzo was having races recategorised in Italy to prevent the almost inevitable defeat on home soil as the 250LM was not homologated as a GT and would have to run as a prototype. GM had pulled the plug on the Grand Sport and so the five chassis that were built had to run as prototypes and so were placed in a difficult position to say the least.

Shelby had earlier in 1964 fit a larger Ford FE engine of 390 cubic inches (6.4 L) in to CSX2196. Unfortunately the car was not able to receive the development it needed as resources were aimed at taking the crown from Ferrari in the GT class. Ken Miles drove and raced the FE-powered Mark II at Sebring and pronounced the car virtually undriveable, naming it “The Turd”. It failed to finish with the engine expiring due to damper failure. A new chassis was required developed and designated Mark III. CSX2196 was revised for the show down at Nassau which allowed a more relaxed class division of racing. This allowed the GT cobras to run with prototype Ford GT, GM Grand Sport Corvettes and Lola Mk.6. The first meeting that the GS Corvettes turned up to in 1963. It was for this event in 1964 that the Fliptop cobra was used. An aluminium 390 cubic inches (6.4 L) engine was used. However, the car failed to finish.

The new car was designed in cooperation with Ford in Detroit. A new chassis was built using 4 in (102 mm) main chassis tubes (up from 3 in (76 mm)) and coil spring suspension all around. The new car also had wide fenders and a larger radiator opening. It was powered by the “side oiler” Ford 427 engine (7.0 L) rated at 425 bhp (317 kW), which provided a top speed of 164 mph (262 km/h) in the standard model and 485 bhp (362 kW) with a top speed of 185 mph (298 km/h) in the competition model. Cobra Mark III production began on 1 January 1965; two prototypes had been sent to the United States in October 1964. Cars were sent to the US as unpainted rolling chassis, and they were finished in Shelby’s workshop. Although an impressive automobile, the car was a financial failure and did not sell well. In fact to save cost, most AC Cobra 427s were actually fitted with Ford’s 428 cubic inches (7.01 L) engine, a long stroke, smaller bore, lower cost engine, intended for road use rather than racing. It seems that a total of 300 Mark III cars were sent to Shelby in the USA during the years 1965 and 1966, including the competition version. 27 small block narrow fender versions, which were referred to as the AC 289, were sold in Europe. Unfortunately, The MK III missed homologation for the 1965 racing season and was not raced by the Shelby team. However, it was raced successfully by many privateers and went on to win races all the way into the 1970s. The remaining 31 unsold examples were detuned and fitted with wind screens for street use. Called S/C for semi-competition, an original example can currently sell for 1.5 million USD, making it one of the most valuable Cobra variants.

Cobra 289 Dragonsnake (CSX 2427)

Cobra 289 Dragonsnake (CSX 2427) showing drag slicks at rear

Shelby wanted the AC Cobras to be “Corvette-Beaters” and at nearly 500 lb (227 kg) less than the Chevrolet Corvette, the lightweight roadster accomplished that goal at Riverside International Raceway on 2 February 1963. Driver Dave MacDonald piloted CSX2026 past a field of Corvettes, Jaguars, Porsches, and Maseratis and recorded the Cobra’s historic first-ever victory. Later, Shelby offered a drag package, known as the Dragonsnake, which won several NHRA National events with Bruce Larson or Ed Hedrick at the wheel of CSX2093. Only five Dragonsnake Cobras were produced by the factory, with three others (such as CSX2093) prepared by customers using the drag package.

An AC Cobra Coupe was calculated to have done 186 mph (299 km/h) on the M1 motorway in 1964, driven by Jack Sears and Peter Bolton during shakedown tests prior to that year’s Le Mans 24h race. A common misconception is that this incident persuaded the British Government to introduce the 70 mph (110 km/h) maximum speed limit on UK motorways, which up until that year had no speed restrictions, although government officials have cited the increasing accident death rate in the early 1960s as the principal motivation, the exploits of the AC Cars team merely highlighting the issue.

The AC Cobra was a financial failure that led Ford and Carroll Shelby to discontinue importing cars from England in 1967. AC Cars kept producing the coil-spring AC Roadster with narrow fenders, a small block Ford 289 and called the car the AC 289. It was built and sold in Europe until late 1969. AC also produced the AC 428 until 1973. The AC Frua was built on a stretched Cobra 427 MK III coil spring chassis using a very angular steel body designed and built by Pietro Frua. With the demise of the 428 and succeeding 3000ME, AC shut their doors in 1984 and sold the AC name to a Scottish company. The company’s tooling, and eventually the right to use the name, were licensed by Autokraft, a Cobra parts reseller and replica car manufacturer owned by Brian A. Angliss.

Chassis numbering

The Ace chassis numbers read AEX… “A” being the car series and “X” being for export with left-hand drive. Later with the introduction of the Bristol engine the chassis numbers ran “BEX…” When switching to the Ford 2.6 engine the Ace chassis numbers ran “RS…” for Ruddspeed as Ken Rudd may have been influential in the choice of engine. The first Cobra chassis was left hand drive and given the next letter in the alphabet,i.e. C. Then “SX” for “Shelby eXport” i.e. exported to USA. Therefore the numbers ran CSX… for all the US export Cobras. The four following numbers ran from 2000 sequentially. When the MKIII Cobra was built the identification ran from CSX3000, the 3 signifying coil spring suspension. For the European market the cars were built wholly by AC cars in Thames Ditton using engines and transmissions imported from Ford USA. These cars were given chassis numbers beginning “COB….” for “Cobra Britain” i.e. RHD home market and “COX…” for “Cobra Export” i.e. RHD export other than to USA. COB/COX cars had chassis numbers beginning with a 6 and then either a 0 to signify a leaf sprung chassis or a 1 to signify a coil sprung chassis.

Autokraft era

Autokraft manufactured an AC 289 continuation car from 1982 as the Autokraft Mk IV, basically a Mk III with a 302 cubic inches (4.95 L) Ford V8 and Borg Warner T5 Transmission. The Mk IV also received an independent suspension. Shortly thereafter, Carroll Shelby filed suit against AC Cars and Brian A. Angliss, in U.S. District Court in Los Angeles. The ensuing settlement resulted in Shelby and AC Cars/Angliss releasing a joint press release whereby AC/Angliss acknowledged that Carroll Shelby was the manufacturer of record of all the 1960s AC Cobra automobiles in the United States and that Shelby himself is the sole person allowed to call his car a Cobra. Nonetheless, production of the Mk IV continued, from 1987 as a joint venture with Ford as the AC Mk IV with a 250 hp (186 kW) at 4,200 rpm, 4,942 cc Ford V8 which provided a top speed of 215 km/h (134 mph) and 0–100 km/h in 5.2 seconds. At the 1990 Geneva Salon the Lightweight version was presented: weight was down to 1,070 kg (2,360 lb) (compared to 1,190 kg or 2,620 lb) and power was up to 370 hp (276 kW) at 5,750 rpm thanks to alloy heads, a Holley four-barrel carburettor, and no catalytic converter. While the Lightweight did not meet US federal regulations, the Mk IV did, and 480 cars of all versions were built until 1996.

Post Autokraft era

Brian Angliss left AC Cars in 1996 and the company was restructured under new management. Two new ‘Cobra’ style cars were launched in 1997, the ‘Superblower’, an aluminium-bodied car with a supercharged 4,942cc Ford V8 providing 320 bhp and the cheaper ‘Carbon Road Series’ (CRS) with a carbonfibre body and a 225 bhp version of the Ford V8 engine. 22 Superblowers and 37 CRSs were built between 1997 and 2001.

A further variant, ‘the 212 S/C’ with a 3506 cc 350 hp twin-turbocharged Lotus V8 engine was introduced in 2000, but only 2 examples were built.

In 2006, AC closed its UK factory and moved to Malta. However only 3 right-hand drive carbon-fibre AC Mk Vs powered by 340 bhp 5-litre Ford V8 engines were built before the Maltese operation closed. Since 2009, AC has licenced Gullwing GmbH in Germany to produce the AC MK VI, with an aluminium coated composite body and powered by a 6.2 litre 440 hp LS3 Chevrolet engine, or a 550 hp supercharged version. In the UK, AC Heritage based at Brooklands, is licenced by AC to produce traditional 289 and 427 continuation ACs.

Coupé

Main article: Shelby Daytona

1965 Willment/Ghia Coupe (CSX3055)

In an effort to improve top speed along the legendary Mulsanne Straight at the 24 Hours of Le Mans race, a number of enclosed, coupe variations were constructed using the leafspring chassis and running gear of the AC/Shelby Cobra Mark II. The most famous and numerous of these were the official works Shelby Daytona Cobra Coupes. Six were constructed, each being subtly different from the rest. AC Cars also produced a Le Mans coupé. The car was a one-off and was nearly destroyed after a high-speed tire blow-out at the 1964 Le Mans race. The car was qualified conservatively second in GT. The race started well with the AC, chassis number A98, maintaining its position in the top two in GT and even leading the class for a time. This was not to last as an act of sabotage (newspaper in the fuel tank) began to block the fuel filter. The car lost time until this was diagnosed and cleaned out. The car proceeded on at the predetermined conservative lap time and for the next stint remained trouble free. The car was able to match the Shelby Daytona’s speed despite running a higher differential ratio (2.88 instead of 3.07) and a lower state of engine tune for reliability (355 hp instead of the Daytona’s 385 hp).

The third significant Cobra-based coupe was the Willment Cobra Coupe built by the JWA racing team.

A road-going Shelby Daytona Cobra replica is being manufactured by Superformance and Factory Five Racing, a well known kit car company. These cars use Pete Brock’s bodywork designs, scaled up to increase room inside, and a newly designed spaceframe chassis, they are powered by Roush-built Ford Windsor (Sportsman) engines. The Superformance Shelby Daytona Coupe is the only modern-day vehicle recognized by Shelby as a successor to the original Coupes.

Other road-going Shelby Daytona Cobra replicas include Daytona Sportscar from Australia.

Counterfeit Cobras

In 1993 the Los Angeles Times exposed a Carroll Shelby scheme to “Counterfeit” his own cars. With the price of an original 427 c.i. Cobra skyrocketing, Shelby had, by his own written declaration executed under penalty of perjury, caused the California Department of Motor Vehicles (the government agency responsible for titling vehicles and issuing operator permits) to utter forty-three “Duplicate Titles” for vehicles that did not officially exist in company records. A letter from AC Cars confirmed the fact that the chassis numbers Shelby had obtained titles for were never manufactured, at least by AC Cars. Only fifty-five 427 c.i. Cobras had been originally produced out of a block of serial numbers reserved for 100 vehicles. Shelby had taken advantage of a loophole in the California system that allowed one to obtain a duplicate title for a vehicle only on a written declaration, without the vehicle identification number appearing in the DMV’s database or the declarant ever presenting an actual vehicle for inspection. Shelby later admitted that the chassis had been manufactured in 1991 and ’92 by McCluskey Ltd, an engineering firm in Torrance, California, and were not authentic AC chassis.

Continuation cars

50th Annyversary Cobra Limited Edition CSX800050th Annyversary Cobra Limited Edition CSX8000.

From the late 1980s onwards, Carroll Shelby (Shelby Automobiles, Inc.) and associated companies have built what are known in the hobby as “Continuation Cars”; Shelby authorized continuations of the original AC-built Cobra series. Produced in Las Vegas, Nevada, these cars retain the general style and appearance of their original 1960s ancestors, but are fitted with modern amenities. Initially the car everyone wanted in a Continuation was a 427 S/C model which was represented in the CSX4000 series. This was meant to continue where the last 427 S/C production left off, at approximately serial number CSX3560 in the 1960s.

The initial CSX4000 series cars were completed from the chassis built by McCluskey Ltd as well as other new parts and reconditioned Ford engines. Given the value of the vehicle many “extra” cars have appeared over the years, even some sharing the same chassis number. Gradually as the vintage parts supply ran low, newly constructed frames and body panels were obtained from a variety of suppliers. The production of chassis numbers CSX4001 to CSX4999 took roughly 20 years and many different business relationships to complete.

All models of Cobra produced are available now as continuations. In 2009, CSX4999 was produced, concluding the 4000 series. Production has continued with the CSX6000 serial numbers, featuring “coil over” suspension. The 289 FIA “leaf spring” race version of the car is reproduced as CSX7000, and the original “slab side” leaf spring street car is the CSX8000 series.

To date most continuations are produced in fiberglass, with some ordering cars with aluminium or carbon-fibre bodywork.

In 2004, at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Ford unveiled a concept for a modernized AC Cobra. The Ford Shelby Cobra Concept was a continuation of Ford’s effort to bring back the retro sports cars that had been successful in the 1960s, including the Ford GT40 and the fifth generation Ford Mustang.

Cars were also produced by AC Cars until 2006, and since 2009 have been produced by AC Heritage, who are licensed by AC to produce 289 and 427 continuations.

Super Snake

Competition 427, (CSX3009) Ollie the DragonCompetition 427, (CSX3009) “Ollie the Dragon”

AC produced only 23 AC Cobra 427 competition roadsters. In 1966, one was selected and converted into a special model called the 427 (CSX3015) “Cobra to End All Cobras.” The first one of these was originally part of a European promotional tour before its conversion. This conversion called for making the original racing model street legal with mufflers, a windshield and bumpers amongst other modifications. But some things were not modified, including the racing rear end, brakes and headers. The most notable modification is the addition of Twin Paxton Superchargers, TPS. Shelby crafted two 427 models by himself adding a TPS. He gave Bill Cosby one and kept one for himself the CSX3303. He eventually converted the competition roadster to a street legal car with windshields, mufflers, etc. and named it the 427 SC ( semi-competition).

Another non-competition 427 roadster, CSX3303, was converted and given to Shelby’s close friend, entertainer Bill Cosby. Cosby attempted to drive the super-fast Cobra, but had issues with keeping it under control; he recounted his experience on his 1968 stand-up comedy album 200 M.P.H.. Cosby gave the car back to Shelby, who then shipped it out to one of their dealers in San Francisco, S&C Ford on Van Ness Avenue. S&C Ford then sold it to customer Tony Maxey. Maxey, suffering the same issues as Cosby did with the car, lost control and drove it off a cliff, landing in the Pacific Ocean waters.

Shelby’s original model, CSX3015, was kept by Carroll Shelby himself over the years as a personal car, sometimes entering it into local races like the Turismos Visitadores Cannonball-Run race in Nevada, where he was “waking [up] whole towns, blowing out windows, throwing belts and catching fire a couple of times, but finishing.” The CSX3015 was auctioned on 22 January 2007, at the Barrett-Jackson Collector Car Event in Scottsdale, Arizona, for $5 million plus commission (£2.8 million), a record for a vehicle made in the U.S.

The AC Invacar

AC Invacar Model 57 registration NPB 840DAn AC Invacar Model 57 in the Museum of Transport in Manchester

The Invacar was a small vehicle adapted for use by disabled drivers.

History

In 1948, Bert Greeves adapted a motorbike with the help of his paralysed cousin Derry Preston-Cobb as transport for Derry. Noticing the number of former servicemen injured in the Second World War they spotted a commercial opportunity and approached the UK government for support, leading to the creation of Invacar Ltd.

Invacar model 70A model 70

Early vehicles were powered by an air-cooled Villiers 147 cc engine, but when production of that engine ceased in the early 1970s it was replaced by a much more powerful 4-stroke 500 cc or 600 cc Steyr-Puch engine, giving a reported top speed of 82 mph (132 km/h). During the 1960s and 70s the Invacar, with its modern fibreglass shell and ice-blue colouring nicknamed Ministry Blue after the Ministry of Health, was produced in the tens of thousands. Developments including an extended wheelbase, wider track and use of Austin Mini wheels saw the Invacars right through to the end of the final DHSS contract in 1977. More than 50 variants were produced.

1976 AC Invalid Carriage1976 AC Invalid Carriage

On 31 March 2003 Invacars were banned from British roads because of safety concerns.The veteran vehicle could not meet modern-day government regulations, which required approval under the Motorcycle Single Vehicle Approval Scheme as part of a standard set by the European Union. There were still around 200 Invacars in Britain prior to the 2003 recall and scrapping programme. Hundreds of stockpiled Invacars in government warehouses were scrapped along with all their spare parts. A few examples survive in the hands of private owners and museums in Britain and abroad.

All Invacars were owned by the government and leased to disabled drivers as part of their disability benefit. Their use had been in decline since the introduction of the Motability scheme, which offers disabled drivers a conventional car with modified options.

The AC Frua 427 + 428

AC Frua
1971 AC 428 Convertible

1971 AC 428 Convertible
Overview
Manufacturer AC Cars
Also called AC 427
AC 428
Production 1965–1973
81 made
Designer Pietro Frua
Body and chassis
Class Coupé
Convertible
Powertrain
Engine 7 litre V8
Transmission 4-speed manual
3 speed automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase 95 in (2,413 mm)
Length 176 in (4,470 mm)
Width 68 in (1,727 mm)
Height 49 in (1,245 mm)
Curb weight 3,150 lb (1,430 kg)

The AC Frua or AC 428 is a British GT built by AC Cars from 1965 to 1973. With an Italian body, British chassis, and American big block V8 it is a true hybrid. Production was 81 cars built in total: 49 coupés (known as fastbacks), 29 convertibles, and 3 special bodied.

History

1967-AC-Shelby-427-Cobra-MkIII-7.0-liter-V81967-AC-Shelby-427-Cobra-MkIII-7.0-liter-V8

The Frua is built on an AC Cobra 427 Mark III chassis extended by 6 inches (150 mm). Chassis were built at the AC plant in England then shipped to Frua’s workshop in Italy where the body was fitted and then sent back to England to have the power train and trim added. The cost was high and the cars could not be sold at a competitive price. Unlike similar cars such as the Iso Grifo, Iso Rivolta, Monteverdi, and De Tomaso models of the period, the AC Frua features fully independent racing based coil spring suspension.

The AC Frua was never fully developed because AC Cars lacked the financial means. The car’s main drawback is a tendency of the V8s heat to bleed into the cabin.

Chassis

1971 AC Frua convertible1971 AC Frua convertible

Chassis construction was similar to most Italian supercars of that era, with square and rectangular tubing connecting the steel body to the frame. Though the 4-inch (100 mm) tubular chassis allowed both coupé and convertible versions to be rigid, the design was intricate and prone to rust. The bonnets and boot lids were fabricated from aluminum.

1972 AC 428 Frua Listing Full1972 AC 428 Frua Listing Full

Performance

1968 AC 428 Frua coupé, front1968 AC Frua coupé, front

1968 AC Frua coupé, quarter1968 AC Frua coupé, quarter

1968 AC Frua coupé, rear1968 AC Frua coupé, rear

The AC Frua competed with Ferrari, Lamborghini, and Maserati models. Built over a stretched AC Cobra 427 chassis, the car had immense performance; the big-block Ford FE engine had larger capacity, more torque and more power than similar Italian cars, but in a car of similar weight.

1969 AC Frua 428 Coupé II1969 AC Frua 428 Coupé II

John Mclellan said in his book “Classic ACs, Auto Carrier to Cobra” that Derek Hurlock once said to journalist Mike Tailor: “I like the 428 because it fits my image of a true GT Car”. He is quoted in Autocar “Like anything exclusive, especially from craftsmen, it costs a lot of money. For this you get one of the fastest cars on the road, guaranteed to make an impression anywhere, and backed by a small company that cares. This one AC that joined that select company of very fast, very luxurious touring automobiles which moved effortlessly from current model to collector’s piece”. The magazine published a road test report in 1968 of a 428 coupé, and recorded a maximum speed of 141 mph (227 km/h) along with a 0 – 60 mph (97 km/h) time of 6.2 seconds. The acceleration time was fractionally better than the magazine’s testers had achieved with an Aston Martin DB6, but the Aston Martin was comfortably ahead on top speed. The AC’s overall fuel consumption for the test came in at 15.6 mpg (18.1 l/100 km), roughly 15% better than the heavy Aston Martin. The AC 428 coupé sported a recommended UK retail price of £5,573 (including automatic transmission), to the manual transmission Aston Martin DB6’s £4,460 – itself roughly twice that of a 4.2 litre Jaguar E-Type roadster at £2,225.

AC 428 Frua interior AC 428 Frua AC Frua ac-428-frua-2 Frua AC 428 Coupe ad b Frua AC 428 Coupe ad Shelby AC 427 Cobra vl blue

Towards the end of the production run a couple of prototypes for an extended range were produced. There was a four door version of the coupe and a more streamlined version of the convertible that included electrically operated “pop-up” headlamps. Neither were developed due to the precarious state of the company finances.

The AC Frua may be confused with the very similar looking Pietro Frua designed Maserati Mistral. However, only the front quarter windows and door handles are shared.

AC Frua Technical Data
Chassis AC Cobra 427 Mark III” four inch (100 mm) tube frame extended by 6 inches (150 mm). Front engine, rear drive.
Engine Iron “big block” Ford FE 428, some models fitted with higher performance crossover bolted Ford 427 engine (side oiler). Hydraulic lifter, Autolite or Holley four barrel carburetor. (Specifications can vary substantially between each car).
Bore & stroke 104.9 X 101.2 mm, 10, 5:1 compression.
Capacity 428: 7,014 cc (428.0 cu in), 427: 6,965 cc (425.0 cu in).
Power 428: 345 hp (257 kW) @ 4,600 rpm, 427: 385 hp (287 kW) @ 5600 rpm
Torque 428: 642 N·m (474 ft·lbf) @ 2,800 rpm, 427: 624 N·m (460 ft·lbf) @ 3200 rpm
Transmission Fully synchronized 4-speed Ford Toploader transmission (close-ratio) or 3 speed automatic Ford C6 transmission.
Steering Rack & Pinion.
Front suspension Fully adjustable independent suspension with double triangular wishbones, coil spring hydraulic telescopic shock absorbers.
Rear suspension Adjustable independent suspension with double triangular wishbones, coil spring hydraulic telescopic shock absorbers.
Differential Salisbury, limited slip. Ratio: Automatic 2.88, Manual 3.08.
Brakes Four discs power assisted “Girling” 3 pistons, dual remote servo assistance.
Body Coach-built steel body over extruded rectangular and square tubing.
Measurements 4,470 mm (176.0 in) X 1,727 mm (68.0 in) X 1,245 mm (49.0 in); Wheelbase 2,413 mm (95.0 in).
Unloaded weight 1,430 kg (3,153 lb)
Maximum speed Manual Transmission: More than 245 km/h (152.2 mph), 0 to 100 km/h (0-62 mph): 5.4 s (Autosport Magazine); Automatic Transmission: 220 km/h (136.7 mph), 0 to 100 km/h (0-62 mph) 5.7 s.
Fuel consumption 17.2 L/100 km (16.4 mpg-imp; 13.7 mpg-US)
Production life 1965 to 1973
Number of cars built 49 coupes, 29 convertibles and 3 special bodied cars.

 The AC 3000ME

AC 3000ME
1973 AC ME3000 yellow
Overview
Production launched 1973
available for sale 1979-84
1984-85 by AC (Scotland) plc
Body and chassis
Body style 2-door mid-engined sports car
Powertrain
Engine 2,994 cc V6
Transmission 5-speed manual all-synchromesh
Dimensions
Wheelbase 90.5 in (2,299 mm)
Length 157 in (3,988 mm) (saloon)
Width 65 in (1,651 mm)
Height 45 in (1,143 mm)

The AC 3000ME is a British built and designed sports car that was launched at the 1973 London Motor Show in 1973 and offered for sale by AC Cars between 1979 and 1984.

Origins

During the 1970s, AC Managing Director, W Derek Hurlock, developed a new and smaller car. Mid-engined designs were in fashion at the time and in 1972 the prototype Diabolo was built with an Austin Maxi engine and transaxle Peter Bohanna and Robin Stables. However, following considerable investment in development using the BLMC power unit and transmission, the engine manufacturers decided that they needed all the E series engines they could make to power their own Maxi and Allegro models, so the Diabolo project appeared likely to collapse for lack of an engine.

Development

In much the same way as they had taken up the Tojeiro prototype and turned it into the Ace, AC acquired the rights and at the 1973 London Motor Show showed their own version, the mid-engined ME3000 with the 3.0-litre Ford Essex V6 engine installed transversely over a custom AC-designed gearbox. The car featured a steel chassis making extensive use of square-section steel tube, with a strong monocoque for the central portion of the body. This framework supported a glass fibre body.

Press releases of the time indicated that the company hoped to be able to build and sell the car at the rate of 10 – 20 cars per week, although it was at this stage apparent that the model was in many ways not yet ready for serial production.

Development was complete in 1976 when new Type Approval regulations were introduced. A prototype failed the 30 mph (48 km/h) crash test, and the chassis had to be redesigned. On the second attempt, the car passed.

The design changes meant the AC 3000 ME was out of date by the time it reached production. The first cars (now renamed 3000ME) were delivered in 1979, by which time they were in direct competition with the Lotus Esprit. The goal of 250 cars per year did not seem possible.

The end

After 71 cars were sold, Hurlock called a halt to production as his health was suffering and the company was struggling during a period of recession. In 1984, production stopped at Thames Ditton and the car and the AC name were licenced to a new company registered as AC (Scotland) plc run by David McDonald in a new factory in Hillington, Glasgow. Here, 30 cars were built, including a development car tested with Alfa Romeo‘s 2.5-litre V6 engine and a nearly-complete Mark 2 prototype of the same. Regardless (or possibly because) of these developments, AC Scotland called in the receivers in 1985.

AC Ghia

1981 AC ME3000 Ghia 1982 AC GhiaAC 3000ME Ghia

At Geneva in 1981, Ghia displayed a concept car based on AC 3000ME mechanicals called AC Ghia. It was compact for its size, only 3 feet 10 inches (1.17 m) high and under 5 feet (1.5 m) wide.

AC Ace

AC Ace
1953-1963 AC Ace

1953-1963 AC Ace
Overview
Manufacturer AC Cars
Production 1953–1963
Body and chassis
Class Roadster
Body style 2-door roadster
Related AC Aceca
AC Greyhound
AC Cobra
Powertrain
Engine 2.0 L I6 (AC)
2.0 L I6 (Bristol)
2.6 L I6 (Ford)
Transmission 4-speed manual (With overdrive available)
Dimensions
Wheelbase 90 in (2,286 mm)
Length 152 in (3,861 mm)
Width 59.5 in (1,511 mm)
Height 49 in (1,245 mm)
Curb weight 1920 lb (871 kg)
Chronology
Successor AC Cobra

AC Ace is a car which was produced by AC Cars of Thames Ditton, England, from 1953 to 1963.

History

AC came back to the market after the Second World War with the staid 2-Litre range of cars in 1947, but it was with the Ace sports car of 1953 that the company really made its reputation in the post war years. Casting around for a replacement for the ageing 2-Litre, AC took up a design by John Tojeiro that used a light ladder type tubular frame, all independent transverse leaf spring suspension, and an open two seater alloy body made using English wheeling machines, possibly inspired by the Ferrari Barchetta of the day.

Early cars used AC’s elderly 100 bhp (75 kW) two-litre overhead cam straight-six engine (first seen soon after the end of the First World War), which, according to a 1954 road test by Motor magazine, gave a top speed of 103 mph (166 km/h) and 0–60 mph (0–100 km/h) in 11.4 seconds and a fuel consumption of 25.2 miles per imperial gallon (11.2 L/100 km; 21.0 mpg-US). It was hardly a sporting engine, however, and it was felt that something more modern and powerful was required to put the modern chassis to good use.

Joining the Ace in 1954 was the Aceca hard top coupé, which had an early form of hatchback rear door but used the same basic timber framed alloy body.

From 1956, there was the option of Bristol Cars‘ two-litre 120 bhp (89 kW) straight-six with 3 downdraught carburettors and slick four-speed gearbox. Top speed leapt to 116 mph (187 km/h) with 0–60 mph (0–100 km/h) in the nine second bracket. Overdrive was available from 1956 and front disc brakes were an option from 1957, although they were later standardised.

1958 AC Ace, AC engined1962 2.6-litre Ruddspeed-engined Ace

In 1961 a new 2.6-litre (2,553 cc (155.8 cu in)) straight-six ‘Ruddspeed’ option was available, adapted by Ken Rudd from the unit used in the Ford Zephyr. It used three Weber or SU carburettors and either a ‘Mays‘ or an iron cast head. This setup boosted the car’s performance further, with some versions tuned to 170 bhp (127 kW), providing a top speed of 130 mph (209 km/h) and 0–60 mph (0–100 km/h) in 8.1 seconds. However, it was not long before Carroll Shelby drew AC’s attention to the Cobra, so only 37 of the 2.6 models were made. These Ford engined models had a smaller grille which was carried over to the Cobra.

With the engine set well back in the chassis, the Ace handled well and was successful in competition.

Motor Sport

The car raced at Le Mans in 1957 and 1958. Few cars with this provenance have survived and are extremely valuable. They can range from $100,000 or more for an unrestored car, even one in pieces, to in excess of $400,000 for a restored AC Ace.

AC Cobra

1962 Shelby AC Cobra, CSX2000

1962-shelby-ac-cobra-csx2000

When Bristol ceased building their 6-cylinder engine in 1961, AC’s owner, Charles Hurlock, was approached by Carroll Shelby to use a Ford V8 in the Ace chassis, producing the AC Cobra in 1962. Production of the Ace ended the same year. The AC Cobra came in small block and later big block configurations. It was Ford’s 289 that powered the winning car in the GT class at Le Mans in June 1964. At the time, the AC Cobra 427 was the fastest “production” car in the world.

AC Automotive

AC Automotive, based in Straubenhardt, Germany still builds the AC under the original name. Cars are sold in Germany, France and England with sales in Luxembourg, Holland, Lichtenstein, Switzerland and Belgium slated for the future. Pricing for the standard ACGT model starts at £104,400 before options.

Replicas

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

1999 AC Cobra Replica

As with the Cobra, some AC Ace replicas have been made such as the Hawk Ace but are much rarer.

The AC Aceca

Aceca
1957 AC Aceca Bristol prepared for the Carrera Panamericana Mexican road race

1958 AC Aceca.
Overview
Manufacturer AC Cars
Production 1954–1963
Body and chassis
Class Grand tourer
Related AC Ace
Powertrain
Engine 2.0 or 2.6 L I6
Transmission 4-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase 90 in (2,286 mm)
Length 153.5 in (3,899 mm)
Width 61 in (1,549 mm)
Curb weight 2120 lb (962 kg)

The Aceca (pronounced “A-See-Ka”) is a closed coupé from the British AC Cars company, produced from 1954 until 1963. The car originally had an AC engine but the similar Bristol-engined Aceca-Bristol was also available alongside the original from 1956 to 1963 when production of the engine ceased. A few cars were built from 1961 to 1963 with a 2553 cc tuned Ford Zephyr engine and sold as the Aceca 2.6.

Based on the open two-seat AC Ace, the Aceca was a hand-built grand tourer in the British tradition, with ash wood and steel tubing used in their construction. One notable feature was the hatchback at the rear, making the Aceca only the second car, after the 1953 Aston Martin DB2/4, to incorporate this element.

151 Acecas, 169 Aceca-Bristols and 8 Ford-engined models had been built when production halted in 1963.

The main difference between the Aceca and Aceca-Bristol was the engine. Both used a straight-6 unit, but the Aceca shared its 90 hp (67 kW), 1,991 cc (121.5 cu in) overhead camshaft AC engine with the lighter AC Ace, while the Aceca-Bristol used a 125 hp (93 kW) “D-Type” 2.0 L (1971 cc/120 in³) unit sourced from Bristol Cars. The Aceca-Bristol was also available with a milder “B-Type” Bristol engine of 105 hp (78 kW). The Bristol specification added $1000 to the Aceca’s $5,400 price tag in the United States. In the UK, the basic car cost £1722.

The front-end styling of the Ace and Aceca reportedly traces back to a design done by Pinin Farina for AC in the late 1940s. The car is rather light owing to a tubular frame, aluminium engine block and aluminium body panels. Large 16″ spoked road wheels and near 50/50 weight distribution allowed exceptional handling on substandard pavements. Later Acecas feature front-wheel disc brakes (added in 1957), while all share transverse leaf spring IRS, articulated rear half-axles, worm-gear steering, an optional overdrive on 2nd, 3rd and 4th gears, curved windshield, and leather-covered bucket seats. The suspension is independent at the front and rear using transverse leaf springs.

Aceca-Bristol

1957 AC Bristol Aceca rearBristol-engined AC Aceca (1957)

The in-line six Bristol engine fitted to the Aceca-Bristol was based on a design from BMW with cast iron block and aluminium cylinder head. It has a single camshaft with pushrods running vertically to a rocker shaft on the inlet side of the engine and further horizontal pushrods running in 6 tubes over the top of the engine in order to reach the exhaust rockers. The two inclined rocker covers give the engine a similar appearance to an overhead – camshaft arrangement. Three inline Solex downdraft carburettors bolted directly to the cylinder head casting via small adaptor plates.

Driving

The car has a fairly hard ride owing to the stiff suspension and holds the road well in corners, with some oversteer. The narrow wheelbase is noticeable, though. On the downside, the 90 hp (67 kW) engine is best at higher rpm, so the 0-60 mph time is not exceptional. Other weaknesses include inadequate rear mirrors, even though the hatchback window affords a large rear view, a heating system that isn’t suited for cold winters, and inadequate soundproofing for easy passenger conversation when cruising above 75 mph (121 km/h). The gear-shift is more solid than smooth and has synchromesh on 2nd, 3rd and 4th gears, only.

1958 AC Aceca Coupe1958 AC Aceca (1954-63)

1994 AC Ace 19981994 AC Ace 1998

1998 AC Aceca .1998 AC Aceca

The AC 212 S-C 2000

2000 AC Cobra 212 S-C Roadster MkIV AC-MKIV-212-SC

The AC Cobra MK IV 2010

2010-AC-Cobra-MkVI-2 AC Kobra HP II Basis_chrom_Aufhellung unten m.Dach  008

The AC MK II 2012

AC MkII

AC 378 GT Zagato

AC 378 GT Zagato
2012 AC 378 GT Zagato
Overview
Manufacturer AC Cars
Also called Perana Z-One
Assembly Hi-Tech Automotive, South Africa
Designer Zagato
Powertrain
Engine 6.2 L V8
Dimensions
Kerb weight 1,465 kg (3,230 lb)

The AC 378 GT Zagato is a sports car designed by the Italian design company Zagato and built in South Africa by Hi-Tech Automotive. It was unveiled at the 2012 Geneva Motor Show. The design of the 378 GT was previewed in 2009 as the Perana Z-One, and is now badged as an AC Cars product. Sales are expected to commence by the end of 2012.

The car is powered by a 437 bhp (326 kW; 443 PS) 6.2 L V8 GM sourced engine found in the Chevrolet Camaro. Weighing 1,465 kg (3,230 lb), the company predict a 0-60 mph acceleration time of under four seconds and a top speed around 185 mph. The car does not feature any electronic driver aids.

I found today a site with much more AC”s and thought that you readers of my blog had the right to see them too.

So here they are in as good as possible the right order:

Some readers complain about my spelling and English. English is not my home language so I apologize for it. You have to do it with that.

1908 AC Sociable 5-6 hp 1908 AC Sociable Runabout 1909 AC Auto Carrier 1909 Auto Carrier 1 1909 Auto Carrier AC Sociable 1910 1910 Autocarrier 1911 700cc AC Sociable 1911 AC Sociable 1912 AC Sociable a 1912 AC Sociable 1913 AC Sociable  Engine 214cc 1914 AC Sociable 1916 AC 12HP 1920 ac-12-hp-tourer Joyce in 200 mile race AC - long wheelbase 1921/22 1921-1922 Joyce.JPG 1923 AC-Ten 4 1924 A.C. Royal Roadster 1924 AC 10hp. (1920-38) 1296cc PD 1924 AC 10hp. 1496cc 1924 AC Royal Roadster 12hp 1925 AC 12 hp 1925 AC 12HP Royal Four Seater 1925 AC Six Engine 1478cc S6 1926 AC Royal 12hp Tourer 1926 AC Six 1680 Iepazisti-auto-AC-Cars-5 1926 Acedes Royal 16-40 Acedes Magna 16-56 & 16-66 1927 AC Six (16-40, 16-56 and 16-66) car 1927 ac six 1680 competition red retro side view cars grass 1928 AC 12hp Coupe The annual McLaren Employee Motor Show, held at the McLaren Technology Centre, Woking, Surrey 1929 AC Six (16-40, 16-56 and 16-66) car a 1929 AC Six (16-40, 16-56 and 16-66) car b 1930 AC 16-56 16-66 1930 AC 16-56 Magna 1931 AC 16-56 four-door saloon 1932 AC 16-56 Magna Coupe 1933 AC Ace 16-56 1934 AC 16-56 Greyhound Saloon with sliding roof 1934 AC Ace 16-56 Drophead Coupe cost £435 1934 AC Two Door Saloon 1935 A.C. 16-70 Sports Drophead Coupé 1935 Ac 16-66 1935 AC 16-70 Modified Engine 1991cc S6 PC 1936 Ac 16 56 1936 AC 16-70 2 litre Drop head Coupe 1936 Ac advert 1937 AC 16-50 coupe 1937 Ac ace 1938 AC 16-60 greyhound saloon 1938 AC 16-80 Sports Car 1938 AC 16-80 two-seater sports competition 1939 AC 2litre 6cyl sports 1939 AC 2-litre saloon 1939 AC 16-80 tourer 1947 AC 2-litre 1947 AC dhc 1947 AC saloon 1948 AC 2 Litre Saloon Shooting Brake 1948 AC advert 1948 AC sport saloon 1949 AC 2 Litre 1949 AC 2-Litre 4 Door Saloon 1949 AC 2litre saloon 1949 AC 2-litre Saloon 1949 AC 2000 Buckland b 1949 AC Drophead Coupé 1949 AC Sports Tourer by Buckland 1949 Seven of the 28 Southend Pier Railway cars, built by AC-Cars 1950 AC  Bookland Tourer 1950 AC 2litre saloon 1950 AC 2-Litre Sports Tourer 1951 AC 2 Litre 2 Door Saloon 8999160611 AC 2-litre 1951 AC buckland 1952 AC 2-Litre Saloon 1952 1952 AC 2000 4d olw764goodwood06-2-2 1952 AC buckland sports tourer mk i 1952 AC Buckland Sports Tourer Tourer 1952 AC Petite at Buckland factory 1952 AC saloon 4dr 1952 AC sedan 1953 4drsalooncloseup_sm 1953 A C Petite ad a 1953 A.C. 2 Litre JOM 446 1953 AC 2 Liter Sport Saloon 1953 1953 AC 2 litre saloon 1953 AC ace prototype 1953 AC Petite ad 1953-1963 AC Ace 1954 AC 2litre convert 1954 AC 2litre saloon 1954 AC ace (2) 1954 AC Ace 16-56 Family Saloon 1954 AC Ace 1954-63 AC Ace Bristol Engine 1971cc S6 1954-63 AC Ace-Bristol Engine 1971cc S6 YP 1955 AC 2-litre 2-door Essex 1955 AC ace may ad 1955 AC Petite (2) 1955 AC petite 1955 AC-2litre UK 1956 AC ace 1956 AC advert 1956 AC Petite a 1956 AC Petite logo 1956 AC Petite Mk II 1956 AC Petite 1956 AC petite2 october 1957 AC Ace Bristol ad 1957 AC ace bristol le mans 1957 AC ace bristol 1957 AC Aceca Bristol prepared for the Carrera Panamericana Mexican road race 1957 AC advert 1957 AC Bristol Aceca rear 1957 AC lav93 1957 AC petite mk II 1958 AC ace bristol 1958 AC Ace, AC engined 1958 AC Aceca Coupe 1958 AC aceca coupe 1958 AC Bristol Roadster 1959 AAC greyhound oct ad 1959 AC ace bristol 1959 AC ace 1959 AC aceca Bristol 1959 AC bristol lemans 1960 AC greyhound a 1960 AC greyhound int 1960 AC greyhound rear 1960 AC Greyhound 1961 AC 2,6litre 1961 AC Aceca Coupe 1961 Cobra 289 Dragonsnake (CSX 2427) 1962 2.6-litre Ruddspeed-engined Ace 1962 A.C. Greyhound Saloon 1962 AC Cobra (2) 1962 AC cobra 260 london 1962 AC Cobra 1962 AC Greyhound 1962 Shelby AC 427 Cobra vl blue 1962 Shelby AC Cobra, CSX2000 1962-69 AC Cobra 289  Engine 4727cc V8 a 1962-69 AC Cobra 289 Engine 4727cc V8 1963 AC Cobra 289 Engine 4727cc V8 1963 AC greyhound 1963 AC Shelby Cobra Mk II 1964 AC cobra 289 competition 1964 Shelby Daytona Cobra Coupe (CSX2299) 1965 AC  1965 427convertible oct 1965 AC Cobra 427 Willment-Ghia Coupe Engine 6997cc V8 OH 1965 AC Cobra 427 Willment-Ghia Coupe Engine 6997cc V8 OHV 1965 AC Cobra 6504 1965 Willment-Ghia Coupe (CSX3055) 1966 AC 427 convertible 1966 AC 428 Convertible 1966 AC cobra 427 ghia 1966 AC cobra 427 s-c 1966 Shelby AC Cobra photographed in Laval, Quebec, Canada at the Auto classique Laval. 1967 AC 428 coupe 1967 AC 428 Fastback-Coupe-2 1967 AC 428 Frua 1967 AC Cobra 289 1967 Frua AC 428 Coupe ad 1967-AC-Shelby-427-Cobra-MkIII-7.0-liter-V8 1968 AC 428  UK 1968 AC 428 coupe 1968 AC 428 Frua coupé, front 1968 AC 472 cabrio 1968 AC cobra 1968 AC Frua coupé, quarter 428 1968 AC Frua coupé, rear 1968 AC's 428 Grand Tourer 1969 AC 428 1969 AC Cobra 428 coupé 1969 AC Frua 428 Coupé II 1970 AC Frua 1970 Frua AC 428 Coupe ad b 1970 Invacar model 70 1971 AC 428 Convertible 1971 AC 428 Frua interior 1971 AC Frua convertible 1972 AC 428 Frua Listing Full 1973 AC ME3000 UK 1973 ac-cobra-427 big 01 1974 AC Invacar Model 57 registration NPB 840D 1975 AC Invacar 1976 AC Invalid Carriage 1977 AC Electric Invocar 1978 ac-428-frua-2 1979-85 AC 3000ME Engine 2994cc 1980 Competition 427, (CSX3009) Ollie the Dragon 1980 CSX2000 – The first Cobra completed by Shelby 1981 AC ME3000 Ghia 1982 AC Ghia 1984 AC 3000 ME Engine 2993cc V6 1994 AC Ace 1998 1998 AC Aceca . OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA 2000 AC Cobra 212 S-C Roadster MkIV 2001 50th Annyversary Cobra Limited Edition CSX8000 2005 AC Schnitzer ACS5 Sport M5 E60 2007 AC Schnitzer ACS3 Sport BMW M3 2009 AC Schnitzer Profile – BMW Z4 M Coupe 2010 AC Cobra MkVI 2010-AC-Cobra-MkVI-2 AC Kobra HP II Basis_chrom_Aufhellung unten m.Dach  008 2012 AC 378 GT Zagato AC 2 AC Auto Avio Costruzioni 815 AC MkII AC Tipo 815 AC_Cars_logo AC-05 (Microcoche AC Petite) AC-Mamba AC-MKIV-212-SC

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Author: Jeroen

In Dutch, my homelanguage: Ik ben Jeroen, tot januari 2015 was ik al dik 26 jaar werkzaam in een psychiatrisch ziekenhuis in een stad vlakbij Werelds grootste havenstad Rotterdam. Eerst als verpleegkundige/begeleider op high care, later op afdeling dubbeldiagnose (verslavingen) en ook nog een tijdje als administratief medewerker. Ik heb een spierziekte "Poli Myositis" (alle spieren zijn ontstoken) daardoor weinig energie. Sinds augustus 2015 is daarbij de diagnose Kanker gesteld, en ben ik helemaal arbeidsongeschikt geworden en zit middenin de behandelfase. Gelukkig ben ik daarnaast getrouwd, vader, en opa, en heb de nodige hobby's. Een daarvan is transportmiddelen verzamelen en daarmee een blog schrijven. Dit blog begon met bussen, maar nu komen ook sleepboten, auto's trucks en dergelijke aan bod. Kijk en geniet met me mee, reageer, en vul gerust aan. Fouten zal ik ook graag verbeteren. In English: I'm Jeroen, till januari 2015 I was already 26 years working as a nurse in a psychiatric hospital, near Rotterdam, Worlds biggest harbour with more than 98 nationalities living within it's borders. First I worked on closed high care ward and the last years on a ward with mainly addicted people. I liked my work very much. In 2007 I got ill. I got the diagnose Poli Myositis, a musscle dissease. Al my mussles are inflamed. And last august I got another diagnose. Cancer. It's plaveicelcel carcinoma and treated with Chemo and radioation. So I've even less energy than the last years. Still I try to make something of my life and the blog is helping with surviving with some pleasure.

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